Dental Tips Blog

Jun
21

Here’s Why You Should Put a Cap on That Chipped Front Tooth

Posted in Crowns

Is your smile graced with a roguish chip in your teeth?

Like many others with a chipped front tooth, you may not be bothered by the look. The only thing that matters is that it doesn’t hurt.

Still, that tooth might need a crown more than you realize.

The Dangers of a Chipped Tooth

Your fractured tooth might not be in pain, but you might regret its sharp edge later on. Cracked teeth can be very rough. If you accidentally bump your lip, that edge could cause a deep and cut. A sharp tooth could go all the way through your lip if you got hit hard enough.

Chipped teeth are weaker than intact ones. They can’t distribute bite pressure evenly the way a whole tooth can. Your enamel will always be at risk of fracturing even more, the longer you go without treating it.

Crowning Extends the Lifespan of Cracked Teeth

Cap your chipped front tooth and you’ll give it enhanced strength. The crown will redistribute the force from chewing or injury and make your tooth more likely to survive for many more years.

Don’t Wait to Crown Your Tooth!

The longer you go without capping your tooth, the greater the risk. Dental crowns need sufficient tooth material to hold onto. But if your tooth fractures far beyond where the damage is currently at, it might have to be extracted. Not to mention, the next fracture will likely be a lot more painful than you had imagined.

Don’t wait. Put a crown on your broken tooth if you want to spare yourself discomfort and inconvenience in the months and years to come. Visit a restorative dentist to learn about other options that might be available.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

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