Dental Tips Blog

Oct
20

Temporary Dental Crown Aftercare: What You Need to Know

Posted in Crowns

You’re still numb from the anesthetic. Your dentist has prepped your tooth down to fit under a new restoration. It’s been capped with a plastic or metal temporary crown.

What’s the next step? Here’s what you need to know.

Take Medications as Directed

Your dentist will give you instructions on taking medications for reducing pain or preventing infection. Follow those carefully to avoid complications.

Chew Carefully

Avoid chewing on your temporary crown for at least an hour after getting it put on. It’s safest to just chew on the opposite side of your mouth for now.

Floss with Caution

Flossing should be an important part of your daily routine, but you’ll want to give that tooth with the temporary crown a break. If the floss catches under the edge, it can pop the cap right off.

Use Desensitizing Toothpaste

Gently brush around your capped tooth with a desensitizing toothpaste. This formulation has minerals that will insulate your vulnerable tooth that’s just been covered by a temporary crown.

Call the Dentist if the Temporary Crown Comes Off

The temporary crown is there for a reason! If it comes off any sooner than the day you’re scheduled to get a permanent cap, then you’ll need to have it recemented.

Keep Your Dental Appointments!

Your tooth may have a pretty new cap, but the temporary crown is just that: temporary. It’s just a placeholder while you wait for the permanent crown to be finished up. You can’t leave it there and expect it to last indefinitely. It’s highly prone to leaking and popping off.

Rather than take your chances, see your dentist for the next appointment in the week or two after you get the temporary crown.

Posted on behalf of:
ConfiDenT
11550 Webb Bridge Way, Suite 1
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 772-0994

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