Dental Tips Blog

Aug
22

Is a Dental Bridge Right for You?

Posted in Dental Bridges

Dental bridges work just like road ones do…but with an extra feature. They span a gap to connect Point A and Point B while suspending a replacement tooth in the middle.

Should you replace your missing tooth with a bridge?

What Makes Up a Dental Bridge?

Dental bridges are made the same way dental crowns are. A bridge is just two crowns bonded over (abutment) teeth on either side of a gap. A false tooth is attached between the crowns.

You may get a bridge made entirely out of a durable metal, like gold. Most people, however, prefer the natural look of porcelain.

Some bridges are made of a combination of materials: a metal base that anchors to the teeth covered with a porcelain layer for aesthetics.

Dental Bridges: the Pros and Cons

First, a few of the benefits.

Bridges work great for anyone who doesn’t want the hassle of a removable partial denture. Once the bridge is in place, it stays there for good. A bridge will also help maintain your tooth alignment, preventing other teeth from shifting into the empty gap. Finally, bridges help prevent food from packing into the gums.

Now here’s why you may want to consider bridge alternatives:

Like other dental restorations, a bridge won’t last forever. It will eventually need to be replaced. Also, to get a bridge, you have to crown at least two teeth, and if they’re healthy teeth, crowning will only weaken them unnecessarily. While bridges even out your bite, they don’t keep the gum and bone in the gap from shrinking.

Ask your dentist whether a bridge is the best option for replacing your lost tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Mitzi Morris, DMD, PC
1295 Hembree Rd B202
Roswell, GA 30076
(770) 475-6767

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