Dental Tips Blog

Sep
10

How Tartar Buildup Affects Your Smile

Dental calculus (also known as tartar or calcium buildup) can cause some serious problems if it isn’t removed regularly.

What Dental Calculus Does to Teeth

You might be surprised to learn that tartar doesn’t usually do anything bad to teeth themselves. Calculus is comprised of dead bacterial debris. This means that if there were any cavity-causing germs the plaque on teeth, they’ll be long dead and harmless once trapped in tartar.

Dental calculus actually prevents food and stains from reaching your tooth enamel. It’s also good for insulating sensitive teeth against temperature extremes. Most people find that their teeth are quite sensitive right after having tartar removed in a cleaning.

So, does this mean that dental calculus is good for your oral health?

Far from it!

What Tartar Does to Gums

Tartar buildup isn’t merely a cosmetic issue or matter of personal preference. What you really need to worry about is how it affects your gums.

As dental calculus deposits grow, they chafe delicate gum tissue.

The result? Gum inflammation and recession due to the gums detaching from your teeth.

Tartar growth also triggers a vicious cycle. It promotes new bacterial growth, which causes gum inflammation. Inflamed gums puff out and leave gaps next to teeth where more germs move in and where more tartar forms. The new dental calculus continues to irritate the tissue and makes that gap or pocket a little bigger. More bacteria and debris accumulate, deepening the pocket.

Eventually, the tissue breakdown can reach the point where your teeth loosen and fall out.

A small spot of dental calculus can be a big deal! See your dentist for regular dental cleanings and checkups to prevent the complications that come with tartar buildup.

Posted on behalf of:
Gwinnett Family Dental Care
3455 Lawrenceville Hwy
Lawrenceville, GA 30044
(770) 921-1115

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