Dental Tips Blog

Sep
13

Everything You Need to Know About Dental Implant Failure

Posted in Dental Implants

Are you too nervous to get a dental implant because you’re afraid it might fail? Here’s what you need to know about the real risks of dental implant failure and if they’re likely to affect your smile.

Dental Implant Failure: How Common is It?

The first thing you should know about dental implants is that they are highly successful. Failure is quite uncommon and only happens in around 2 – 5% of cases. Modern dental implant technology continues to minimize the risk of failure. Careful planning and detailed imaging make implants the successful restorations they are.

Why Implants Fail

There are, however, certain conditions that can lead to or predispose you to dental implant failure. These include:

  • Poor oral hygiene
  • Smoking
  • Medications that impact bone healing
  • Infections
  • Poor overall health
  • Teeth grinding habit
  • Biting on your implant too soon
  • Nerve/tissue damage during the surgery
  • Rejection by your body
  • Puncture to the nasal sinus cavity

Your dentist or implant specialist can help you understand your risk of implant failure and take steps to minimize it.

Even after you take every precaution possible, there is still that slim chance your dental implant could fail.

Signs to Look for If You Suspect Dental Implant Failure

Your dental implant needs immediate attention if you notice that it’s loose or suddenly painful. Swollen and/or receded gums around your implant are also a bad sign. Your implant is supposed to be able to handle a lot of weight when you chew, so difficulty eating is also a bad sign. Additionally, a fever could mean that your implant is infected.

Careful consultation with your implant dentist can help you make a success of upcoming dental implant therapy!

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

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