Dental Tips Blog

Sep
11

Pain After Dental Implant Surgery: What’s Normal and What Isn’t

Posted in Dental Implants

Whether you have a dental implant procedure scheduled or are just curious about the possibility, you’re duly concerned about how much it could hurt.

Some pain after a dental procedure is to be expected. But how much is normal for implants?

Typical Discomfort After Getting a Dental Implant

An implant surgery involves only a very small part of your mouth. You’ll also be numbed up the entire time, so you won’t feel anything. Even so, the procedure involves small incisions on your gum tissue and creating a hole in the bone. Minor discomfort is normal after the numbing wears off, but bone doesn’t have any nerve endings so the pain is minimal.

On the whole, however, most dental implant recipients are surprised to report that it didn’t hurt as bad as they thought it would. The discomfort usually lasts no longer than ten days with each day an improvement over the last. There may be some swelling, too, but that usually disappears within a few days of the procedure.

You can greatly reduce your discomfort after getting a dental implant by holding an ice pack against your face, taking a pain reliever, getting lots of rest, and sticking to a soft foods diet for a couple days.

Signs Something Is Wrong After Getting a Dental Implant

What kind of pain is not normal for a dental implant recovery? You’ll want to watch out for these signs of trouble:

  • Pain that lasts longer than two weeks
  • Pain that shows up long after you’ve recovered from your implant
  • Fever during recovery
  • Implant parts feeling loose
  • Swelling that won’t go down or that spreads to other parts of your face

Talk with a local implant dentist to learn more about the benefits and risks of getting a dental implant.

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…