Dental Tips Blog

Oct
22

What to Do When Your Child’s Tooth Is Knocked Out

It’s a traumatic event for everyone involved – your kid is freaking out over the blood and you’re horrified to realize a tooth is missing.

What do you do?

  1. Locate the tooth.

First of all, establish whether the tooth was an adult or baby tooth and try to find it. If it was a baby tooth that fell out prematurely, you still need to see a dentist but the situation isn’t so urgent.

When it comes to an adult tooth, on the other hand, timing is everything.

  1. Calm and clean up your child.

Bring your child to a sink where he or she can spit out blood and rinse out their mouth. Try to calm him or her down and place some clean gauze or tissue over the trauma site. Get them to bite down, as the pressure will help stop the bleeding.

  1. Clean the tooth.

When you’ve found the tooth, handle it by the crown and avoid touching the root, if the tooth is still intact. Rinse it off very gently in clean water; do not use any soap and do not scrub the tooth.

  1. Store the tooth safely.

At this point, if you have a whole, intact adult tooth in your hand, it’s a good idea to try placing it back in the socket. This is the best place since it increases the odds that the tooth will reattach to the gum fibers in the socket.

If replacing the tooth isn’t an option, store it in a small container of milk or the child’s saliva.

  1. Call a pediatric dentist ASAP.

A kid’s dentist needs to evaluate your child’s tooth to see whether successful reattachment is possible. If not, he or she will discuss options for repairing or replacing the tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Manhattan Dental Design
315 W 57th St Suite 206
New York, NY 10019
(646) 504-4377

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