Dental Tips Blog

Aug
5

Bleeding Gums—Are Your Hormones to Blame?

Posted in Gum Disease

Do your gums bleed in spite of your best efforts to keep them clean?

Women are subject to many body changes thanks to fluctuating hormones. Some of these changes are significant and some are so small that you barely notice them.

For example, hormones can have an impact even on small areas such as your gum tissue.

How Hormones Affect Gums

The surge or other sudden shift in the levels of hormones including estrogen and progesterone can trigger odd changes in the gingiva.

You may experience more gum sensitivity and gingivitis at times in your life when your body has heightened levels of these hormones.

Specifically, you might have tender swollen gums that bleed around events like:

  • Puberty
  • Menstruation
  • Pregnancy
  • Taking contraceptives
  • Menopause

If you develop gingivitis suddenly and around a few random teeth, then this is a sign that your gums may be suffering from hormonal changes. In contrast, gingivitis that develops gradually around large areas of your mouth and that lasts for weeks suggests that your oral hygiene could use some improvement.

Protect Your Gums During Hormonal Changes

Even if your gingivitis is a temporary result of hormone fluctuations, it can still provide a gateway for a more serious infection if you don’t treat it.

Oral hygiene prevents disease-causing plaque from building up and triggering gum inflammation. Keep your gums healthy at all times by brushing carefully along your gum line every day and flossing around each tooth daily, as well. An antimicrobial rinse can also help prevent gum disease by limiting bacteria growth around your gums.

See your dentist regularly for gum health checkups to learn more about keeping your gums healthy despite the influence of hormones.

Posted on behalf of:
Manhattan Dental Design
315 W 57th St Suite 206
New York, NY 10019
(646) 504-4377

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