Dental Tips Blog

Sep
9

Deep Gum Cleaning—What You Need to Know

Posted in Gum Disease

Your dentist just told you that you need to have a “deep cleaning” and you’re terrified.

But the more you know about this kind of gum therapy, the less you’ll have to fear. Your dentist most likely prescribed the deep cleaning because your gums show signs of inflammation and infection.

Deep Cleanings Can Save Your Teeth

Gum tissue swells in response to the presence of plaque. As bacterial growth advances, the infection breaks down bone tissue around teeth. This creates pockets between the gums and tooth roots, where more germs collect.

A “deep cleaning” is when the dental hygienist uses specialized tools to remove plaque, tartar, and other debris from the surfaces of your roots inside the pockets.

The purpose of deep cleanings is to provide a smooth base for the gum tissues to start healing and reattaching to. A deep cleaning is the first step to restoring the health of your gums.

Left untreated, gum disease can worsen to the point that teeth get loose and fall out.

Deep Cleanings Don’t Hurt

You’ll be numbed up for the cleaning procedure. Afterwards, your gums may feel a bit sore and your tooth roots might ache slightly from having the buildup removed. Overall, however, it’s not a traumatic experience.

How to Avoid Deep Cleanings

If you take measures to prevent gum disease beforehand, you can avoid the need for having such procedures. Daily brushing and flossing are the best ways to slow down the development of plaque bacteria that cause gum inflammation.

Ask your local dentist for a comprehensive gum health evaluation to learn more about your need for gum therapy.

Posted on behalf of:
Dunwoody Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
1816 Independence Square, Suite B
Dunwoody, GA 30338
(770) 399-9199

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