Dental Tips Blog

Jun
19

Why Do Dentists “Poke” Your Gums and Then Say You Need to Floss More?

Posted in Gum Disease

It’s ironic to be told you need to improve your oral hygiene while your dentist seemingly pokes and prods your gums with small metal instruments.

But everything makes sense once you understand how your gums work.

Get to Know Your Gums

Your gingiva is more than just a delicate layer of skin over your teeth. It contains a thick and complex network of blood vessels and ligaments.

Gum tissue is very susceptible to infection and inflammation from the presence of germs in your mouth. Your gums are essentially a gateway to the rest of your body and their health has a significant influence on your overall wellness.

What Your Dentist Is Looking For

As your dentist (or hygienist) is “poking” around your gums, they’re measuring them to determine whether there are any signs of tissue loss. Exploring with special tools also reveals the presence of tartar on teeth below the gum line.

Prodding your gums with an instrument may be uncomfortable and cause bleeding if your gums are already inflamed. However, healthy gum tissue is tight and doesn’t easily bleed even when bumped. That’s why your dentist may give you some oral hygiene advice after examining your gums and finding that they are, in fact,  infected.

Flossing Improves Your Periodontal Health

Flossing can also make tender, infected gums bleed at first if you aren’t in the habit of using floss regularly. But your dentist wants you to start flossing daily since this activity disrupts the growth of bacteria that cause gingivitis and gum disease.

So, when your dentist lectures you on flossing, it usually means there are signs your gums are unhealthy. Proper flossing can improve your condition. Contact your dentist to learn more about improving your gingival health.

Posted on behalf of:
Gwinnett Family Dental Care
3455 Lawrenceville Hwy
Lawrenceville, GA 30044
(770) 921-1115

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