Dental Tips Blog

May
19

Could Flossing Spread Bacteria Around Your Mouth?

Posted in Gum Disease

The goal of flossing is to disrupt bacterial activity between your teeth. But some people would argue that sliding the floss through one germ-loaded spot and moving on to floss other teeth only helps spread the germs around.

Yes, it’s true that flossing does pick up and transfer bacteria. But the results aren’t as dramatic as you might think.

What Happens When You Floss

Plaque is a naturally-occurring film made up of food debris and bacterial colonies. To effectively kill all the bad germs, you have to physically stir up plaque and break down those colonies. This is what flossing is for.

Brushing and rinsing alone can’t get at all the plaque stuck between teeth and under the gum line. Flossing breaks up dental plaque, making it easier to brush and rinse away.

Bacteria in Your Mouth

Do you have a cluster of germs creating a pocket in the gums between two of your teeth?

If so, it means you have the germs elsewhere in your mouth. The bacteria only create trouble when they’re allowed to thrive undisturbed in a particular area.

Floss doesn’t transfer bacteria from a diseased tooth to a healthy one – the germs were already there to begin with. If you have one problematic tooth or patch of gum tissue, then there must be some reason it collects more germs than other places in your mouth.

Flossing Works!

Flossing will make it easier for you to control the levels of bacteria in your mouth and avoid periodontitis (gum disease) and other dental problems. For the cleanest results, follow up your flossing with two minutes of brushing and a rinse with an antibacterial mouthwash.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

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