Dental Tips Blog

Apr
24

The Link Between Stress and Gum Disease

Posted in Gum Disease

Research shows that if you’re stressed out, then your gum health may be in danger.

How Stress Affects Your Gums

There seem to be a couple of ways in which high anxiety levels can make your oral health deteriorate:

Stress raises cortisol levels, which in turn lower your body’s immune system and increase inflammation in tissues like your gums.

Stress is tiring, distracting, and can put you off a healthy routine of oral hygiene, adequate sleep, a nutritious diet, and regular dental visits, all of which are necessary to gum health. Stress may also have you reaching for the tobacco products more often than usual.

Your body may be under more stress than you realize. Changes like a new job or house can cause anxiety despite being positive things.

Other Risk Factors for Gum Disease

Gum inflammation is ultimately caused by bacteria found in plaque. But your gums may be extra-sensitive to those germs if you have certain risk factors for periodontal disease.

You might be prone to gum health problems if you’re stressed and have one or more of the following risks:

  • Poor oral hygiene
  • Damaged or improperly-fitting dental restorations
  • Tobacco use
  • Diabetes
  • Pregnancy
  • Taking medications like calcium channel-blockers

Add stress on top of any of these risk factors, and you’ve got a recipe for gum disease.

Lower Your Stress, Lower Your Risk

Reduce stress by trying relaxation techniques or exercising. Drink more water, eat more fresh fruits and vegetables, get more sleep, and cut back on or eliminate your dependency on tobacco products.

Take steps to improve your oral hygiene. Visit a dentist near you for a gum health evaluation and personalized tips on fighting gingivitis.

Posted on behalf of:
ConfiDenT
11550 Webb Bridge Way, Suite 1
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 772-0994

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