Dental Tips Blog

Feb
3

Are You Paying Attention to Your Gums When You Brush?

Posted in Gum Disease

When you think about “brushing,” you automatically think “teeth.”

Brushing is very important for dental health. But did you know that it is equally as important for your gum health, too?

Here are some ways to show your gums a little more love while you brush each day.

45 Degrees at the Gum Line

Most importantly, make sure you’re brushing with the toothbrush bristles angled into your gum margin at about 45 degrees. This will ensure that you wick away all the plaque bacteria that accumulate there.

Germs are responsible for causing cavities, but other kinds of bacteria contribute to problems like gingivitis and periodontitis. Getting rid of this plaque film every day will lower your chances of gum disease.

Give Your Gums a Massage

While you brush along the gum line, wiggle the toothbrush in short and fast, yet gentle strokes. This jiggling motion is good for loosening plaque and it also stimulates healthy circulation in your gum tissue, which boosts your gums’ infection-fighting ability.

You can take things a step further by purchasing an electric toothbrush or a blunt-tipped gum stimulator. These make it easier to massage your gums to better health.

Rinse Out

An antibacterial rinse after brushing and flossing can slow down plaque growth for several hours. This has therapeutic benefits for your gums just as much as your breath.

Watch for Blood

Your gums should not bleed when you brush! If you see pink in the sink, that means you’re either brushing too harshly or there’s something more serious going on. You’ll need to see a dentist for advice.

Schedule regular oral health checkups at your local dental office to make sure your gums are in perfect shape.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverwood Dental
3350 Riverwood Pkwy #2120
Atlanta GA 30339
(770) 955-2505

 

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