Dental Tips Blog

Jul
13

Why You Still Need to See a Dentist Even Though Your Teeth Feel Fine

Posted in Gum Disease

So you’re one of the lucky few who’ve never had a dental filling.

Whether you attribute your stellar teeth to diet, genetics, or a great flossing routine, you’re grateful you don’t have steep dental bills.

But your dentist still wants to see you on a regular basis. That’s because white teeth are nothing without strong gums to hold them in place.

The Role Gums Play

Your gums protect sensitive tooth roots, but they also are unique in their ability to nourish and cushion teeth. They contain a rich network of blood vessels, nerves, and ligaments. Tooth roots connect to the gums at special junctures which help anchor teeth in place.

Gums are irreplaceable. If something happens to them, your teeth lose valuable support.

How Is Your Periodontal Health?

Your gums and the ligaments that lie beneath are classified as periodontal tissues.

Periodontal damage often happens gradually and it’s usually painless.

Some signs of gum disease are easy to pick up on:

  • Chronic bad breath
  • Receding gums
  • Loose teeth

But if periodontal disease sets in, it destroys those ligaments long before you’d notice any of these signs.

Here’s where your dentist comes in.

Only a dental professional can detect and measure periodontal damage before you notice the signs. X-rays and other tools can determine the level of healthy gum tissue you have left.

Regular dental visits aren’t just for the benefit of your teeth. A checkup at the dentist’s is also a chance to find out how your gums are doing.

Besides that, you’ll also get valuable tips from your dentist on how to treat or even avoid gum disease.

Don’t wait! Call today to schedule your periodontal health evaluation.

Posted on behalf of:
Dunwoody Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
1816 Independence Square, Suite B
Dunwoody, GA 30338
(770) 399-9199

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