Dental Tips Blog

Oct
16

4 Questions You Have About Your Child’s New Adult Teeth

Your child’s new adult teeth are beginning to come in. Naturally, as a parent, you worry about their dental health. Here are 4 common questions and answers about your child’s new permanent teeth:

Why do my child’s new teeth have bumpy edges?

These bumps are called “mamelons,” and are completely normal. They wear off with time, which is why adults don’t have them. If they don’t start wearing off, it might be a sign that your child’s bite isn’t aligned properly.

Why haven’t my children’s adult teeth been coming in at the same rate?

It’s normal for girls’ adult teeth to come in earlier than boys. Children should start to see their permanent teeth coming in at around 6-7 years of age. If your child is 7 or 8 and hasn’t started this process, consult a dentist or pediatrician.

Why are my child’s new adult teeth are yellow?

Baby teeth are milky white, but new adult teeth appear yellow. Don’t worry, they’re actually clean and healthy. New permanent teeth have more dentin than baby teeth. This dentin is yellow in color and shows through the enamel so the adult tooth looks yellow compared with remaining baby teeth. Tooth color will look lighter with time, once all of the primary teeth fall out.

When is my child ready to start seeing a dentist?

You should have your baby see a pediatric dentist as soon as 1 year of age, or within 6 months of getting his or her first tooth. That way the dentist can make sure that everything is developing properly right from the start.

Schedule an appointment with your local dentist today to get a head start on keeping your children’s teeth healthy.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

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