Dental Tips Blog

Mar
31

How to Help When Your Child’s First Molars Come In

The first baby molars show up around age one to one and a half. The next ones come in around age two. Later on in childhood the six-year molars arrive. These are the first adult teeth to show up behind the baby teeth.

Molars are very different from incisors, which easily break through the gums. They have more surface area to work out of the gums. By the time molars come in, your child will be needing them to chew on solid foods. The gum tissue covering a new molar can get irritated and inflamed if bitten on while chewing.

So what can you do to ease your child’s discomfort while molars erupt?

Relief for Sore Gums

Offer soft foods like applesauce and yogurt and soups that aren’t too hot.

Icy teething rings are also helpful. Instead of a toy, you can provide the snack of a raw whole carrot, washed, chilled, and peeled. This will allow your child to massage the gums while cooling them and enjoying a healthy snack.

Ask your child’s pediatric dentist about safe pain-relief medications.

Keep your child’s gums clean as those teeth emerge! The tissue covering molars can easily get infected from food and bacteria buildup.

Healthy Molars for Life

Baby’s primary molars are important because they act as placeholders for what will be the adult bicuspids. Those baby molars may not be lost until as late as age 13. In some rare cases where the adult tooth is not present, the baby tooth may stay in place for life.

Make sure all of your child’s teeth are healthy and accounted for. Schedule a checkup with your child’s dentist.

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

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