Dental Tips Blog

Jan
3

Here’s Why Your Gums Bleed When You Visit the Dentist

Posted in Periodontics

Discovering the real reason for bleeding gums at the dentist can help you get rid of the problem for good.

Bleeding Gums at the Dentist: Is it Normal?

Special dental tools are necessary to remove tough tartar and stain deposits on teeth. As a result of using them in a tiny space like your mouth, the dentist or hygienist can accidentally nick your gums and cause a little bleeding. But usually, this is a rare occurrence.

How much your gums bleed can also depend on the kind of procedure you have done. A simple cleaning shouldn’t ever cause much bleeding.

You should know, however, that bleeding is neither common nor normal in basic and preventative dental treatment. If your gums bleed a lot during every routine visit, then it likely indicates a bigger underlying problem that may require periodontal treatment.

What Makes Gums Bleed

Your gum tissue is filled with tiny blood vessels. These vessels will swell and the skin over them thin out as the gums become inflamed. This makes infected gums bleed very easily when bumped…whether it’s with a dental tool, or just flossing.

Healthy gums shouldn’t bleed at all when they’re bumped during a routine exam or dental cleaning. But gums inflamed by gingivitis are very prone to heavy bleeding. It’s not your dentist’s fault after all!

Prevent Bleeding Gums at the Dentist

You can soothe inflammation in your gums by stepping up your oral hygiene routine. Brushing at least twice daily with the proper technique can prevent gingivitis. Brushing should be accompanied by daily flossing and the use of dental products that slow down the growth of infection-causing plaque.

If bleeding gums are an issue for you, ask your dentist for oral hygiene tips that will bring down the inflammation.

Posted on behalf of:
ConfiDenT
11550 Webb Bridge Way, Suite 1
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 772-0994

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