Dental Tips Blog

Jul
15

Getting Sedation for Dental Treatment – Is It Worth It?

Lots of dental offices advertise sedation dentistry as a way to just sleep through treatment.

Sleep dentistry, however, is actually a term for taking medication that helps you relax during treatment. It doesn’t put you to sleep.

Like any other medical procedure that uses sedation, there are some (rare) risks involved. So the decision to have dental sedation is not one to be made lightly.

Benefits of Sedation Dentistry

Dental patients primarily need sedatives to help them relax if they have incapacitating phobias or anxiety.

Taking a sedative is also a great way to get through a rather lengthy procedure. You may have a hard time keeping your mouth open and staying comfortable through the extraction of all four wisdom teeth, for example.

Sedation may be necessary in any other situation where the patient can’t sit still for long.

Who Should Have Dental Sedation?

Sedation dentistry is usually recommended for:

  • People with anxiety
  • Lengthy or multiple dental procedures in a single visit
  • Small children
  • People with a disability that prevents them from staying calm during treatment

Is Sedation Right for You?

Talk with your dentist before you pin your hopes on having sedation during your next dental procedure.

Discuss any concerns you have about treatment and review your entire health history. This means going over any and all prescription and over-the-counter medications you’re taking. Medication and even certain medical conditions can rule out some sedative options all together.

Sleep dentistry isn’t exactly the luxury experience it’s made out to be. If you have no problem sitting through dental procedures, then you may not need to bother with sedation, at all. Decide with your dentist whether or not sedation is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

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