Dental Tips Blog

May
15

How to Clean Around Your New Fixed Bridge

Posted in Dental Bridges

Now that you’ve gotten a traditional (or implant-supported) dental bridge, you probably feel a sense of relief knowing that your missing tooth has been replaced.

But your bridge isn’t invincible. In fact, if you don’t care for it properly each day, the teeth (or implants) supporting it can experience secondary oral health issues, causing the entire restoration to fail.

Flossing is a Must 

You’ll need to floss under your bridge and around the supporting teeth at least once a day. Both teeth and implants can be affected by gum infections, so flossing is essential.

Additionally, flossing helps reduce the risk of recurrent tooth decay in the teeth that support your bridge. Because the area just under the bridge is the hardest to clean, this takes special effort.

Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Use a floss threader or “super floss” to thread the strand under your bridge
  • Wrap the floss around the supporting tooth, cleaning up and down below the gums, then across the bottom surface of the bridge and against the other tooth
  • Consider getting a water flosser, if traditional floss is too difficult to use 

Brush Along the Gumlines

Take a few extra seconds when you brush twice daily to be sure that you’re getting the edges of the bridge, where it meets your gumlines. Because their margins tend to offer prime surface areas for plaque to adhere to, they need extra attention to keep them completely clean.

Remember to schedule a checkup and cleaning at least every six months to have a dental professional clean away tartar buildup that accumulates in hard-to-reach areas!

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

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