Dental Tips Blog

Apr
17

5 Reasons Your Child’s Oral Health Is Important

Little kids’ teeth are going to fall out in time, but that doesn’t mean their dental health isn’t important.

Here are five reasons to make your children’s smile health a priority.

  1. Neglecting Dental Health Can Cause Kids Pain

Toothaches in kids are just as painful as they are in adults. You should never leave a decayed tooth untreated on the grounds of “it’ll fall out, anyway.”

  1. Children Are Conscious of How Their Smiles Look

Kids usually don’t make decisions with long-term consequences in mind, so they aren’t the best about brushing. Still, they do care about how their teeth look. Even children in kindergarten may suffer from low self-esteem if their teeth are stained from decay and other kids point it out.

  1. Dental Health Is Linked to Overall Health

Oral infections can spread to cause serious problems like abscesses or brain and blood infections. Healthy teeth are essential to eating a healthy diet rich in nutrients that young bodies need.

  1. Dental Health in Childhood Affects Adult Smile Development

Tooth decay in a child is likely to result in decayed and compromised teeth in adulthood. What’s more, severe cavities in baby teeth can even infect adult teeth before they’ve even erupted out of the gums.

  1. Your Child Depends on Having Healthy Teeth

Teeth serve vital functions in eating and speaking. Your child needs to have the teeth nature put there. Preventing and treating dental disease will ensure that your child’s smile stays functional for years.

Schedule regular dental cleanings and checkups for your child to detect, treat, and even prevent problems. Later on in life, your child will thank you for taking care of their smile!

Posted on behalf of:
Marietta Dental Professionals
550 Franklin Gateway SE
Marietta, GA 30067
(770) 514-5055

Apr
11

5 Things You Can Do When Your Child Has a Toothache

Kids can indicate that they have a toothache in different ways. For example, your child may refuse to eat solid foods, stubbornly oppose tooth brushing, have difficulty sleeping, or fuss and cry.

Toothaches in children can be caused by:

  • Cavities
  • Food stuck in the gums or between teeth
  • Sharp edges on a loose tooth
  • New tooth growing in
  • Cracked teeth

Determining the cause of your child’s distress can be difficult. But there are some steps you can take to help him or her get relief.

  1. Swish with Warm Salt Water

Have your child rinse out their mouth with a little salt water. This step is most effective if your child is old enough to tolerate the salty rinse and then spit it out.

Make sure the water is neither too hot nor too cold. The rinse can bring down swelling, cleanse the mouth of some of the bacteria, and dislodge food debris.

  1. Brush Gently

Take a look inside your child’s mouth to see what’s going on. If you notice a lot of plaque or food debris around the problem tooth, try gently cleaning it away with a toothbrush. Simply brushing away the buildup can provide some relief.

  1. Take a Pain Reliever

Next, offer your child a liquid or chewable pain reliever such as Tylenol or Motrin. This can help your child stay comfortable until you can get professional help.

  1. Ice Pack

Offer an ice pack for your child to put on the outside of his or her cheek to numb the pain.

  1. See a Dentist

Even if your child starts feeling better, that doesn’t mean you should ignore their toothache. Head to a pediatric dental office as soon as possible for a checkup.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Nov
27

Dentists Recommend Sealing Adult Teeth ASAP

The American Dental Association states that sealing adult teeth as soon as they emerge in kids’ smiles will help keep them “cavity free from the start.”

If you haven’t already, you’ll likely hear your local dentist or dental hygienist recommending dental sealants for your kids during their next checkup.

What Are Sealants?

A dental sealant is a tiny layer of white plastic-like material that bonds with the chewing surface of a back tooth (molar.) It takes less than a couple of minutes to seal a tooth and it requires no drilling or anesthesia.

Sealing a tooth fills in deep grooves on the chewing surface. These areas can be too deep for a toothbrush to reach. If toothbrush bristles can’t clean out those fissures, then they become prime hideouts for cavity-causing bacteria and acids.

Benefits of Sealing Teeth

  • Prevent decay early on
  • Make tooth brushing more effective
  • Avoid staining in deep pits and fissures
  • Reduce plaque buildup
  • Save money on dental treatment

Why Seal Early?

Baby teeth don’t necessarily need sealants. They can be kept clean enough with proper brushing, thanks to their anatomy. But new adult teeth are at a higher risk.

Kids tend to have a hard time brushing their teeth thoroughly twice a day. Sealants give them a bit of an advantage by lowering a tooth’s cavity risk even if the brushing routine is spotty.

Your child will have their adult teeth for the rest of their life. As much as possible, you want to spare them the expense and discomfort of having to treat tooth decay later on. Sealants are a great way to help your child enjoy a healthy smile for years.

Ask your dentist whether your child is ready to have his or her back teeth treated with protective sealants.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Nov
26

Your Child’s First Dental Visit – How to Prepare and What to Expect

If your child is schedule to have his or her first dental checkup, then you may be just as anxious as they are. Here’s what to look forward to:

How to Prepare for Your Child’s First Dental Appointment

If you’re nervous, avoid letting your child pick up on it. Try to stay calm so that you can convince your child that the visit is something to look forward to.

Read children’s books that feature dental subjects and trips to the dentist to prepare your child. Watch fun cartoons on dental health. Have “practice” sessions at home in which you praise your child for letting you look into their mouth with a flashlight, much like a dentist will do.

Whenever you discuss dental appointments around your child, keep your tone positive so that they can look forward to their own visit.

What Happens at a Child’s First Dental Visit

The first appointment is meant to be entertaining, relaxed, and educational. Your child may be allowed to play with buttons on the chairside sink, spray water or air from a handpiece, and practice brushing on a set of model teeth.

Kids don’t usually need dental work right away. The first visit focuses on just getting them comfortable in the dental chair and familiar with the dentist, plus give you the tools necessary to avoid unwanted cavities!

When you bring your young child to his or her first trip to the dental office, you’ll have the chance to learn a lot about kids’ dental health. The dental team will explain the best way to brush your child’s teeth and what you can do to prevent decay.

Ready to schedule your son or daughter’s first dental checkup? Call a family dentist near you for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Gold Hill Dentistry
2848 Pleasant Road #104
Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708
(803) 566-8055

Oct
16

4 Questions You Have About Your Child’s New Adult Teeth

Your child’s new adult teeth are beginning to come in. Naturally, as a parent, you worry about their dental health. Here are 4 common questions and answers about your child’s new permanent teeth:

Why do my child’s new teeth have bumpy edges?

These bumps are called “mamelons,” and are completely normal. They wear off with time, which is why adults don’t have them. If they don’t start wearing off, it might be a sign that your child’s bite isn’t aligned properly.

Why haven’t my children’s adult teeth been coming in at the same rate?

It’s normal for girls’ adult teeth to come in earlier than boys. Children should start to see their permanent teeth coming in at around 6-7 years of age. If your child is 7 or 8 and hasn’t started this process, consult a dentist or pediatrician.

Why are my child’s new adult teeth are yellow?

Baby teeth are milky white, but new adult teeth appear yellow. Don’t worry, they’re actually clean and healthy. New permanent teeth have more dentin than baby teeth. This dentin is yellow in color and shows through the enamel so the adult tooth looks yellow compared with remaining baby teeth. Tooth color will look lighter with time, once all of the primary teeth fall out.

When is my child ready to start seeing a dentist?

You should have your baby see a pediatric dentist as soon as 1 year of age, or within 6 months of getting his or her first tooth. That way the dentist can make sure that everything is developing properly right from the start.

Schedule an appointment with your local dentist today to get a head start on keeping your children’s teeth healthy.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Oct
15

How to Stop Your Child’s Thumb-Sucking Habit

Thumb sucking is a normal way for babies to self-soothe. They may pick up a habit of doing so any time they are sleepy, bored, anxious, or upset.

Most of the time, babies actually start this habit while they are still in the womb, and then perfect the art of thumb sucking as they reach the toddler years.

Parents worry about their child picking up an illness from putting their thumb in their mouth after touching who-knows-what. It’s also very possible for thumb sucking to cause orthodontic and speech issues.

But it’s important to understand that thumb sucking is a normal activity for small children. Lecturing or scolding them will only make them more anxious.

Try to wait it out. Most toddler naturally quit the habit around the ages of 2-3 when they start to learn other techniques of coping with and expressing their emotions.

What if it looks like your child isn’t interested in stopping?

Children who hold onto a thumb sucking habit later into childhood also risk damaging the alignment of their adult teeth and creating a deformed palate. This will result in speech problems, an open bite, dental issues, and poor self-esteem.

Discourage thumb sucking by:

  • Praising your child when she’s not doing it
  • Helping your child become more self-aware of the habit
  • Identifying triggers for the habit
  • Distracting your child when the urge to suck comes on
  • Rewarding your child when she makes an effort to stop sucking

It takes patience and diligence to break a deeply-entrenched thumb sucking habit. Your pediatric dentist is a great resource for finding a solution that works for your child. Call to schedule a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

Sep
9

Treatment Options for Baby Teeth

Baby teeth might not seem worth the worry since ‘they’re going to fall out, anyway.’

But besides causing pain, a cavity in a baby tooth can permanently damage the incoming adult tooth. If you notice a suspicious looking spot on your child’s tooth, you’ll need to have it examined by a dentist.

Here are the most common options for treating decay in baby teeth:

Fillings

Kids can get fillings the same as adults do. Baby teeth may need a filling to stop and repair cavities if the teeth won’t fall out for several months or more.

Stainless Steel Dental Crowns

These are common for treating large cavities in baby teeth. The decay is cleaned out and the tooth reinforced with a prefabricated metal crown. This procedure is fast and the results long-lasting.

Do Nothing

Sometimes, a little spot of early decay sets in on a tooth that will fall out within the next month or two. There’s no point treating a tooth if it will come out before the cavity can cause problems.

However, it’s up to your dentist to make the call as to whether or not a cavity should be left untreated. A trained dental professional will have a good idea as to how much longer the tooth will be in the mouth.

If the tooth is very close to falling out on schedule, the dentist may even recommend pulling it right there and then. But this, too, should be an option decided at the dentist’s discretion. Pulling baby teeth too soon can cause alignment issues in the adult teeth.

Talk with your pediatric dentist about treatment options for restoring your child’s smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Dec
12

Can Milk Cause Tooth Decay in Babies?

Milk contains natural sugars. Sugars are simple carbohydrates that fuel cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth. Babies pick up these germs from their families soon after birth.

So yes, milk has the potential to cause decay in the newly-erupted teeth of infants and toddlers who drink it.

Avoiding Bottle Rot

Baby bottle tooth decay is linked to a habit of carrying around a bottle or sippy cup of liquid all day long. If your baby has convenient access to milk or juice any time of the day, then he or she is at risk for developing a serious case of cavities.

Promote a healthy baby smile by:

  • Limiting juice and milk to mealtimes, not nap times
  • Wiping out your baby’s mouth with a soft cloth after each feeding
  • Brushing your child’s teeth with a soft toothbrush as soon as they appear
  • Offering your toddler water whenever he or she is thirsty 

What About Breastfeeding?

Breastmilk does contain some natural sugar. So, while it’s rich in good things for your baby, you should still make it a practice to clean baby’s mouth after each feeding, right from the very start.

Breastfeeding seems to play a role in promoting healthy tooth alignment and it’s the best way for a mom to transfer antibodies to her growing baby. This activity is one of the best ways to bond with a new child, so it’s natural to occasionally fall asleep with baby on the breast.

Even still, try not to let that become a habit. Wipe out your child’s mouth after each feeding.

Talk with your pediatric dentist for more information on keeping your baby’s teeth strong and healthy.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

Sep
22

Parents, Don’t Become Guilty of Dental Neglect!

Like any other loving parent, you hate to see your child suffer. Even so, too many loving parents make the same mistake of concluding their kids’ baby teeth aren’t as important as the permanent ones. This view usually leads to dental neglect.

What Is Dental Neglect?

Willfully overlooking the treatment needs of your child’s teeth and mouth adds up to serious infection. Neglect is learning that your child needs a filling or improved oral hygiene but then doing nothing to help them.

Why Your Child’s Dental Health Matters

Baby teeth seem unimportant since they’re going to fall out. Most children aren’t huge fans of brushing and flossing, anyway. But those first teeth act as placeholders for the adult ones to follow.

Letting baby teeth just rot away can cause your child unnecessary pain and pave the way for more serious problems involving adult teeth.

When Choosing Treatment for Your Child

It’s normal to feel disappointed when you hear your little one needs a costly procedure. But your dentist is neither implying you’re a bad parent nor suggesting unnecessary treatment just to make a profit.

At a dental checkup, your child can be accurately diagnosed with x-rays and other tools. It’s also the best way for you to learn how to prevent oral health problems.

So the best way to avoid dental neglect is through prevention and following a dentist’s recommendations.

Still don’t like the diagnosis you’re hearing? Before ruling out dental treatment for your child, consider getting a second opinion. This way, you can be sure of acting in your child’s best interests!

Get a head start on your child’s oral well-being by contacting a local dentist to schedule a checkup.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverheart Family Dentistry
8618 Mexico Road
O’Fallon, MO 63366
(636) 205-4045

May
1

Caring for Your Child’s First Teeth

Did you know that even babies need dental care?

You might think that there isn’t too much there to worry about. True, baby teeth are small and they will eventually fall out. Even so, the teeth your little son or daughter has now need special attention from your pediatric dentist. Those small smiles have to be clean and healthy for your kids to be happy!

Why Baby Teeth Matter

Baby teeth don’t stay forever, but while they’re around, they have a few important jobs:

  • Help your child chew foods to nourish their growing bodies
  • Serve as placeholders for the adult teeth to come
  • Give your child a way to smile and speak properly

Not only are these first teeth essential, but if they do develop a problem, your little one could be in a lot of unnecessary pain.

Start While Young

Pediatric doctors and dentists alike widely recommend cleaning your baby’s mouth regularly after feedings, even before the first teeth arrive. This way, your child gets used to the sensation of having their mouth’s cleaned.

Once the first set of teeth arrives, your baby will be well into the habit of having their mouth cleaned.

Use a soft, clean, moist cloth to gently swab out your child’s mouth after each feeding, whether they have their first teeth or not.

Early Brushing Years

Once your toddler has just about all of their first teeth in, it’s time to get them into regular brushing. Choose a toothbrush with a small head and soft bristles. Ask your dentist for recommendations for a child-friendly toothpaste.

With patience and consistency, you can start your child off on a path to a bright and healthy dental future!

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

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