Dental Tips Blog

Jan
7

3 Options for Fixing a Chipped Tooth

A chipped tooth can be embarrassing at the least, and excruciatingly painful, at worst.

How you fix a fractured tooth will also depend on the extent of the damage. Here are a few of the most common options your dentist may offer:

Dental Bonding

Small chips in teeth can often be patched up with a little composite filling material in a procedure called bonding. The dentist molds the tooth-colored putty against your tooth to fill in the gap and then cures it with a special light.

Bonding doesn’t require much drilling, if any at all. This makes the procedure quick and anesthesia-free.

Dental Veneers

A chipped piece of enamel that can’t be repaired with bonding may call for a veneer – a thin porcelain shell that covers the entire face of the tooth.

Veneers can mask gaps, stain, and rough enamel in addition to covering up chips in teeth.

Dental Crown

Full coverage crowns are best for teeth with large fractures. A crown keeps the entire tooth strong and intact during biting and chewing.

If your fractured tooth has already suffered some nerve damage, then it may need to be treated with a root canal before capping it.

Why You Should Repair a Chipped Tooth

Your chipped tooth may not seem like a big deal. If you don’t mind how it looks and it doesn’t hurt, why bother fixing it?

The truth is that a chipped tooth is weak and prone to breaking even more. The more damaged your tooth is, the harder it will be to fix the chip. Restoring your tooth now will help it retain its natural strength for many years.

Contact a restorative dentist near you to find out which option is best for fixing your fractured tooth enamel.

Posted on behalf of:
Gold Hill Dentistry
2848 Pleasant Road #104
Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708
(803) 566-8055

Nov
26

Will Dental Bonding Be Enough for Your Chipped Tooth?

Posted in Bonding

If you have a chipped tooth, your dentist may be able to patch on a little tooth-colored filling material in a procedure called dental bonding.

Dental bonding is a popular solution for chipped teeth because it’s:

  • Fast, delivering instant results
  • So conservative that drilling and numbing injections usually aren’t needed
  • Cost-effective

However, dental bonding isn’t the best option in every case. You may have to go with a different procedure depending on how damaged your tooth is.

When to Bond a Tooth

Bonding is usually sufficient for a chip in a front tooth that becomes a cosmetic issue or an annoyance. Not all tooth fractures hurt, but a crack can leave a sharp edge that hurts your lips or tongue.

Your Options When Bonding Isn’t Enough

Even if your dentist feels that your tooth needs more than bonding, you still have other options.

The next step up may be a dental veneer. Veneers are usually made of porcelain and they fit over the entire front of a tooth. Rather than risking a large patch of bonding material that may have to be redone time and again, you can just get a completely smooth finish the first time with a dental veneer.

If the chip in your tooth is rather large, then you’ll need the structural support of a crown. Dental caps cover the whole tooth and help to evenly distribute the pressure from biting. A chipped tooth that’s likely to get worse over time may need a crown rather than bonding.

Is Bonding Right for You?

Find out what restorative option is best for your tooth by scheduling a consultation with your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Elegant Smiles
1955 Cliff Valley Way NE #100
Brookhaven, GA 30329
404-634-4224

Jun
20

Will a Filling Be Enough for My Chipped Tooth?

Posted in Crowns

If you’ve recently chipped your tooth, you probably want it fixed yesterday.

Not every dental problem can be fixed with a simple filling. What are your options?

Dental Bonding For A Cosmetic Fix

Are you worried about how a chipped front tooth looks? Dental bonding is your most helpful solution.

Bonding is when your dentist uses a little putty-like resin to reshape the missing part of your tooth. He or she chooses a color that matches your tooth, cures the material after shaping it, and polishes it for a seamless finish.

Cosmetically bonded teeth are not very strong, so this fix is best for front teeth that don’t experience a lot of chewing force.

Filling-Crown Hybrid For Strength

Onlays and inlays are considered “indirect fillings.”

That means they are created outside the mouth and then cemented into your tooth like a piece in a puzzle. They are sometimes called partial crowns for this reason, as well.

Although they don’t cover the entire tooth the way a crown does, indirect fillings will provide more support for teeth like molars that are missing a big chunk of their structure.

When Damage Runs Deep

Do you know how badly your tooth is fractured?

Even if it looks like only a small piece broke off, you should still get it x-rayed. An x-ray is the only way to see inside your tooth to find out whether the fracture is endangering the nerve chamber.

If the nerve, or pulp, of your tooth is compromised, your dentist may recommend a root canal and dental crown.

Clearly, a filling isn’t always the fix your tooth needs! For all of your dental restoration questions and concerns, contact your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Definition Dental
12850 SW Canyon Rd
Beaverton, OR 97005
(503) 644-8900

Sep
8

Will Dental Bonding Be Enough?

Posted in Bonding

When you chip a front tooth, you’re probably worried about getting it fixed as fast as possible!

Not many people care to be seen with a goofy little gap in their smile. If that describes you, then you will want to find the restorative solution that’s fast, beautiful, and durable.

Have you given any thought to dental bonding? Bonding is known for being fast and enhancing the look of a fractured tooth in a very natural way.

Sometimes, however, dental bonding just won’t quite cut it.

How Bonding Works

When your dentist bonds a chipped tooth, he or she applies a tooth-colored material to the gap, shapes it, cures it, and polishes it. The process is very fast, but the restoration is only a patch on an old quilt. Bonding is not meant to bear up under the heavy weight of a bite.

Although bonding will work on most front teeth, it’s also good for shallow repairs. If your tooth suffered damage close to the nerve chamber or bears a lot of weight during chewing, then bonding won’t be enough.

What Are Your Options?

If a front tooth is damaged enough, it needs a crown to stay together. A crown will seal off the entire tooth from threat of decay. Additionally, a crown provides the structural support that bonding does not.

A crown isn’t the answer for every case! If you have a chipped tooth but damage isn’t too deep, you might even go ahead and smooth out the entire tooth with a dental veneer.

Is bonding, a veneer, or a crown right for you? Contact your dentist today to find out!

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

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