Dental Tips Blog

Jun
19

How You Can Make Dental Injections Hurt Less

Thanks to those shots of anesthesia, you can get your necessary dental work done with relatively little discomfort.

Getting an injection in itself can be uncomfortable, however.

The good news is that it’s easy to make these dental shots quite more bearable. Here are a few tricks that can help.

Practice Relaxation Techniques

The more stressed you are, the less likely the anesthetic will even work. If you’re fully relaxed, the injection will probably not bother you, at all. You’ll also need less anesthesia over the course of treatment.

Ask for Topical Anesthetic

Most dentists routinely apply a topical numbing jelly to your gums right before giving the shot. This dulls the sensation of the needle and makes it easier to receive the shot. Some people may never feel their injection at all! Check with your dentist to make sure that there is a topical anesthetic at hand to prepare you.

Keep Your Eyes Closed

You can trust your dentist to give the injection carefully and in the gentlest way. Some patients even report that certain dentists are so gentle that they didn’t even feel the pinch of the injection. If you just keep your eyes closed, you won’t see the needle and won’t know exactly when it’s headed for your mouth (and it’ll all be over before you know it.)

Try Sedation Dentistry

Some people have a genuine phobia of needles and can’t tolerate dental injections no matter what they try.

If you suffer from that kind of intense anxiety, then you may be a candidate for dental sedation. Taking a sedative before your appointment can relax you so that dental injections are then easy and effective.

Ask your dentist which sedation and anesthesia options are safe for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Greencastle Dental
195 Greencastle Road
Tyrone, GA 30290
(770) 486-5585

Feb
3

Is Dental Sedation Expensive?

Some people are extremely sensitive to dental pain and prefer to be sedated during treatment. Others have a strong phobia or anxiety associated with the dentist and need sedation to help them even walk through the doors of the dental office.

Dental sedation might sound appealing if you like the idea of essentially “sleeping” through your next dental appointment.

But what about the cost?

The Cost of Dental Sedation

Minor dental sedation methods involving laughing gas or an oral sedative are not too expensive. Most insurance companies won’t cover such costs, but they really aren’t difficult to cover out-of-pocket when compared with the price of the treatment itself.

Laughing gas is one of the most affordable; the next level up is oral sedation, which can cost up to $300 for one treatment. This price, however, varies depending on where the dental office is located and average pricing in your area.

IV dental sedation is a bit more expensive since it’s more complex. This method is ideal if you need invasive treatment, like oral surgery. You’d be billed by the hour for IV sedation, so you’ll have to consult with the office for an estimate.

Why Pay for Dental Sedation?

Remember that dental sedation is not required except in cases such as jaw surgery. If deep sedation is medically-necessary, then you’re likely to get insurance coverage for part of it.

Additionally, sedation is a tool that can help you get a beautiful and pain-free smile. If dental anxiety is holding you back from reaching that goal, then sedation is worth every penny.

What wouldn’t you pay to finally be free from your dental woes?

Ask your dental office about sedation. Also, ask whether there are any financing options available that can help you afford the cost!

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050

Aug
19

Is Your Dentist Really Trying to Hurt You?

By one estimate, teeth are figured to have upward to 2,000 nerve endings per square millimeter. That’s the greatest concentration of nerves anywhere in the body. As far as soft tissues go, your lips and tongue have the most nerves.

Odds are good that your dentist will get on one of those nerves, sooner or later!

Why Dental Treatment Bites

Despite how it may seem, your dentist is not trying to hurt you.

Your mouth is a surprisingly tiny workspace. Remember how many nerves you have in your mouth? It’s difficult to not bump one, on occasion.

On the plus side, dental instruments are constantly updated to become slimmer, lighter, and gentler. You’ll notice that a lot more procedures are now done with lasers, pressurized air, and jets of water as opposed to manually shaping or drilling with metal tools.

How to Make Dental Treatment More Comfortable

Who knows? There may yet come a time when we will be able to remove a dental restoration, drop it off at the dentist’s for repair, pick it up, and pop them right back in.

But for now, we have to accept the fact that dentistry is complicated work in a tiny field and it’s rarely easy on anyone – patient or dentist.

Clear communication is the best tool to smooth things over.

Let your dentist know in advance what your fears and concerns are. Ask what can be done to help you stay comfortable in the treatment chair.

Having a good relationship with a dentist at an office you like can help make treatment so much easier. Contact a local dentist today to turn over a new leaf in your oral health.

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518
678.730.2005

Jul
15

Getting Sedation for Dental Treatment – Is It Worth It?

Lots of dental offices advertise sedation dentistry as a way to just sleep through treatment.

Sleep dentistry, however, is actually a term for taking medication that helps you relax during treatment. It doesn’t put you to sleep.

Like any other medical procedure that uses sedation, there are some (rare) risks involved. So the decision to have dental sedation is not one to be made lightly.

Benefits of Sedation Dentistry

Dental patients primarily need sedatives to help them relax if they have incapacitating phobias or anxiety.

Taking a sedative is also a great way to get through a rather lengthy procedure. You may have a hard time keeping your mouth open and staying comfortable through the extraction of all four wisdom teeth, for example.

Sedation may be necessary in any other situation where the patient can’t sit still for long.

Who Should Have Dental Sedation?

Sedation dentistry is usually recommended for:

  • People with anxiety
  • Lengthy or multiple dental procedures in a single visit
  • Small children
  • People with a disability that prevents them from staying calm during treatment

Is Sedation Right for You?

Talk with your dentist before you pin your hopes on having sedation during your next dental procedure.

Discuss any concerns you have about treatment and review your entire health history. This means going over any and all prescription and over-the-counter medications you’re taking. Medication and even certain medical conditions can rule out some sedative options all together.

Sleep dentistry isn’t exactly the luxury experience it’s made out to be. If you have no problem sitting through dental procedures, then you may not need to bother with sedation, at all. Decide with your dentist whether or not sedation is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

Apr
22

How to Sleep Through Dental Treatment

Sleep dentistry is a generic term for when treatment done while under sedation. But being sedated doesn’t necessarily mean being totally knocked out.

So if you aren’t actually sleeping, then what’s the point?

What Dental Sedation Does

There are different levels of sedation but all have a similar effect to varying degrees.

There’s nitrous oxide, better known as laughing gas. This is the lightest form of sedation. Other kinds come as pills that you swallow some time before treatment. Then comes IV sedation where the drug is administered directly into your veins.

Stronger medicines in higher doses are used to achieve general sedation, which you’re most likely to need during oral surgery.

Sedatives depress the central nervous system and decreases awareness. Anxiety and fears melt away, and the amnesic effect means that you won’t remember much, if anything, of what happened.

Benefits of Dental Sedation

  • Overcome your dental fears
  • Reduce the impact of anxiety on your body
  • Have multiple phases of dental work done in what feels like just minutes

Sedation is also great for patients (like kids) who have a hard time sitting still.

Is Sedation Dentistry Safe?

It’s important to discuss the risks of dental sedation with your dentist in person before pinning your hopes on scheduling a procedure. This is because everyone’s needs are a little different and everyone responds to sedatives differently.

Sedation can be dangerous if you are taking certain medications. Your dentist needs to know your current medical history in detail before prescribing anything.

With a well-trained dental team, sedation dentistry is perfectly safe and the benefits outweigh the risks.

If you’re interested in learning about your dental sedation options, contact your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Dream Dentist
1646 W U.S. 50
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 726-2699

Feb
11

How to Make Your Next Dental Appointment Comfortable and Pain-Free

Like countless other people, you think of each visit to the dentist as torture.

In fact, dental anxiety may hold you back from getting the care you need on a regular basis. So if you need some help in making your trips to the dental office more enjoyable, then the following tips can help.

Chat with your dentist.

Most dental teams are more than willing to accommodate your needs so that you feel comfortable in their practice. You don’t have to suffer in silence! Talk with your dentist or hygienist to voice your concerns. They’ll be happy to help you, and just talking it out can take a load off your mind.

Take a painkiller beforehand.

This doesn’t mean you should self-medicate before every dental appointment. But if you have an injury or throbbing toothache, dulling the pain before your visit can make it easier to endure an examination.

If you have such a dental emergency or toothache, call your dentist to make sure it’s safe to take an over the counter drug before you come in.

Ask about sedation dentistry.

Some dental offices prescribe anti-anxiety and sedative medications prior to your visit. The medication can help you feel relaxed and calm during treatment.

Dress in loose clothing to add or remove layers as needed.

Having control over your own temperature will help you sit through the appointment in comfort.

Eat breakfast.

Make sure to have a healthy and not-too-heavy meal before your appointment. This will help stabilize your energy levels and emotions and enable you to calmly sit through the appointment.

Want more tips on improving your dental treatment experience? Call your local dental office.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Jan
29

How to Care for Someone Who’s Had Oral Sedation at the Dental Office

If you are responsible for accompanying your friend or family member home after his or her dental sedation procedure, there are a few things you should be prepared to do.  Fortunately, it’s extremely rare for there to be any complications that long after treatment. Your tasks are simple.

Offer A Lift

Someone in a sedated state should never drive. Be prepared to play chauffeur or otherwise guide your friend home via public transportation. The patient also should stay away from heavy machinery.

Stay Away From Alcohol

If the patient is of drinking age and enjoys a cold one at the end of a long day, you’ll want to discourage him or her from indulging this habit, just for one evening. It’s dangerous to mix alcohol with drugs left over in the system.

Watch Them Sleep

The patient may still be drowsy after the procedure. If they zonk out, just check in now and then to make sure they’re breathing normally and wake them if they aren’t.

Follow-up On Pain Management

If your friend still has numb lips and/or tongue from dental treatment, make sure they don’t eat anything crazy hot! It’s also a good idea to stick to clear liquids and light low-fat foods for the first meal to avoid a stomach upset. Monitor the patient’s use of pain medication to make sure they take only the recommended dose.

In the meantime, enjoy listening to some of the goofy things your buddy may say while still sedated! Before leaving the office, make sure you’re clear on everything the patient’s dentist instructs you to do.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

Nov
8

What Is IV Sedation in Dentistry?

Lots of people who struggle with severe dental anxiety choose to get through treatment with the help of IV sedation.

Many dental offices are equipped to provide a sedation experience through an intravenous flow of safe sedative drugs. Often, a dental anesthesiologist works with the dentist. But many dentists become qualified themselves to provide IV sedation by taking rigid accreditation training.

How IV Sedation Works

A needle is inserted into a vein, usually on the back of the hand. The IV solution contains the medication that puts you under moderate sedation. You won’t be completely “knocked out” and neither will you be asleep. Instead, the drug works in two ways:

  • Reducing your sensitivity to pain and discomfort
  • Producing a kind of amnesia so that you don’t remember anything that happened

In addition to IV sedation, you will still need local anesthetic to numb the area the dentist is working on. The professional controlling the sedative will monitor your vital signs and adjust the amount dripping into your body, according to your need.

What To Expect With IV Sedation

The strange part is that during the procedure you will be able to answer questions and respond to directions. For example, the dentist may ask whether you can feel anything after getting a shot. You’ll answer, but it’s going to feel like it didn’t happen because you don’t remember it!

Is IV Dental Sedation Right For You?

Visit your dentist to find out which kind of dental sedation will help make your next appointment a restful one. If IV sedation isn’t available near you, your dentist may still offer an alternative that can keep you just as comfortable.

Posted on behalf of:
Town Center Dental
1110 State Route 55, Suite 107
Lagrangeville, NY 12540
(845) 486-4572

Sep
29

How Long Does Dental Sedation Last?

Are you curious how long dental sedation will “knock you out?” For starters, which kind of dental sedation do you plan on having? The human body responds differently to each kind.

Nitrous Oxide

Better known as laughing gas, nitrogen is administered via a hose that you breathe in from. It’s mixed with oxygen and delivered slowly until it achieves the optimum effect on you. Then, trained dental staff closely monitor you and maintain that level of comfort with the inhaled gas.

As soon as your treatment is done, the dentist or assistant will switch you back to oxygen until the gas mixture has left your system. Within a matter of minutes, you’re back to normal.

Oral Sedation

Some dental offices will give you a medication to take about an hour before treatment. That’s how long it takes for the sedative to kick in. The drug will stay in your system for nearly 24 hours, but it is only fully effective for about two to four hours until it starts wearing off.

Even if you feel back to your usual self soon after your dental sedation appointment, it’s still advised to avoid driving for the rest of the day.

IV Sedation

Much like nitrous oxide, IV-administered sedation is kept at a constant level for as long as treatment lasts. This kind is best for lengthy procedures since it can be delivered continuously without worry of it wearing off. Once your treatment is done, the IV is stopped.

The effects of IV sedation begin to fade almost immediately, but you will feel woozy for some time. You should have a companion escort you home after treatment and keep an eye on you for some time.

Ask your dentist which dental sedation method is best for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

Jul
17

Why Choose a Sedation Dentist?

Although it may sound like something just for children, phobia-sufferers, or special needs patients, sedation dentistry holds out benefits for everyone.

More dentists these days are offering sedation at their practices to improve the treatment experience.

What Does Dental Sedation Actually Do?

Dental sedation doesn’t make you unconscious. Instead, it just alters your awareness slightly enough so that you can relax. You may nod off on your own, but you won’t be completely put under.

Sedation dentistry aims to keep you comfortable. With the help of some medication, you probably won’t remember much about your procedure once it’s over with.

There are different ways you can be sedated. These include inhaling laughing gas, taking a prescription oral medication, or having a sedative slowly introduced to your body via an IV drip.

5 Basic Benefits Of Sedation Dentistry

  • Reduced sensation helps to dull pain
  • Dozing through your treatment makes it go by faster
  • Sedation makes you feel relaxed and limits the effects of anxiety on your body
  • You can get complicated or multiple procedures finished in one appointment
  • If you have a strong gag-reflex, that will be dulled with sedation

Clearly, just about anyone can benefit from dental sedation. Why not give it a try at your next procedure to see what difference it makes for you?

A Sedation Dentist Near You

Ready to try sedation dentistry?

Talk with your local dentist to find out the options available in your area. Relief from your dental anxiety is just a brief phone call away. After setting up an initial consultation with your dentist, you can freely express your concerns and discuss a sedation option that’s right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Seneca Family Dentistry
2860 Seneca St Suite C
Wichita, KS 67217
(316) 633-4048

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