Dental Tips Blog

Oct
20

How Long Do You Have to Wait to Get Dentures After Getting Your Teeth Pulled?

Posted in Dentures

Transitioning from natural teeth to dentures isn’t easy. Adding to your anxiety, you’re wondering how long you’ll be without teeth until you can start wearing your finished denture.

Is it possible to get dentures immediately after your teeth are extracted? Well, the answer can be yes and no depending on your situation.

Healing Period for Dentures

Your mouth will be sore and your gums will be swollen after getting teeth extracted. Healing usually takes around six to eight weeks.

It’s best to get a permanent denture fitted once your mouth is completely healed from the extractions. But most people can’t afford to be without teeth for the weeks or months it takes to heal from multiple tooth extractions. That’s why dentists also offer immediate dentures.

What Are Immediate Dentures?

Your dentist designs an immediate denture based upon measurements of your mouth taken before the extractions. Then, after your teeth are taken out, you’ll be given the immediate denture to wear.

An immediate denture should be worn 24/7 to keep the swelling under control. If you take it off during the initial healing period, you may not be able to fit it back over your gums.

Immediate dentures loosen as the gums heal and shrink to their normal positions. These dentures need to be adjusted multiple times over the healing period to accommodate your mouth. Once healing is complete, you may need to be fitted for an entirely new denture.

You may not qualify for an immediate denture, however, if you have complications or a lingering gum infection after the extractions.

Contact your dentist to find out whether an immediate or traditional denture is best for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverwood Dental
3350 Riverwood Pkwy #2120
Atlanta GA 30339
(770) 955-2505

Oct
20

Sleeping in Dentures—What’s the Harm?

Posted in Dentures

Wearing your denture overnight on occasion might not seem that harmful, especially if it’s just once in a while. But there are a few reasons why you shouldn’t let it become a habit.

Your Jaw Needs a Break from Your Denture

Dentures have a major downside: they put pressure on your jawbone and make it wear away over time. The less you wear your denture, the slower this process will happen.

Your Gums Need a Break from Your Denture

Dentures trap food debris and bacteria against your gums. If you don’t remove your denture for a day or more at a time, all the gunk trapped against your gums can make them irritated and swollen. Let your gums “breathe” by removing your denture at night.

Wearing a Denture Overnight Causes Bad Breath and Infections

Your mouth produces very little saliva when you sleep. The drier environment provides the perfect place for bacteria and fungus to flourish. If you often wear your denture at night, then you’ll be at higher risk for smelly and uncomfortable infections.

Your Denture Could Dry Out at Night

Less saliva in your mouth means less moisture to keep your denture acrylic supple. Your denture may dry out and become uncomfortably tight if you tend to breathe through your mouth when you sleep.

So if you do need to wear your denture all night long on one or two special occasions, you should be fine. Just make time in the morning after you wake up to give your denture a thorough cleaning. Don’t let this become a habit, however!

Ask your denture dentist for more tips on keeping your denture clean, functional, and comfortable.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Oct
19

Worried That You’ll Never Get Used to Dentures? 5 Tips That Can Help

Posted in Dentures

You’ll be rocking that denture with confidence in no time at all thanks to these five tips.

  1. Be Patient with Yourself

No one becomes a denture-wearing expert overnight! Patience, positivity, and a sense of humor are key to getting used to a new prosthesis.

  1. Wear Your Dentures as Long as Your Dentist Instructs

You’ll want to wear your dentures as much as possible to help you get used to it, but you still need to allow yourself sometime without it in to let your gums rest. Following your dentist’s directions will help you stay comfortable and healthy.

  1. Practice Makes Perfect: Eat at Home with Your Dentures

Who needs an audience while you’re trying to chew your food with a set of teeth? Practice chewing tough foods while you’re at home getting used to your denture. You’ll figure out the best ways to chew and cut up foods for stress-free dining.

  1. Get Some More Practice! Try Reading Aloud

Speaking with a denture is a potentially embarrassing experience. You dread making strange noises or drooling or even–worst of all–accidentally spitting out your dentures during a conversation.

Practicing from the privacy of your own home is the best way to build your confidence and ‘relearn’ how to speak with them in. Reading aloud and singing along to your favorite songs are excellent ways to develop new speech habits.

  1. Use a Little Adhesive

Dental adhesives are no substitute for a good-fitting denture, but they can give you added comfort and confidence while you’re just starting out.

Contact your dentist with any questions or concerns you have about getting used to your new denture.

Posted on behalf of:
Mundo Dentistry
3463 US-21 #101
Fort Mill, SC 29715
(704) 825-2018

Oct
17

Painful Dentures? What That Could Mean

Posted in Dentures

Dentures don’t feel or work exactly like natural teeth, but that doesn’t mean it’s normal for them to hurt.

If your dentures are causing you pain, it could be related to a serious problem you need to discuss with your dentist.

Poorly Fitting Dentures

The most common cause of denture pain is having an appliance that doesn’t fit right. Your denture may chafe your gums, pinch your jaw, or press painfully on one part of your mouth. A simple denture adjustment should give you some relief.

Loose Dentures

Have you worn the same dentures for many years now? Your mouth may have shrunk to the point that they’ve gotten loose. Loose dentures can rub painfully against your gums and cause sores.

Dirty Dentures

Are you not in the habit of cleaning your dentures daily? Dirty dentures are loaded with germs and food debris that can cause tender sores and fungal infections on your mouth.

Inadequate Denture Surface

Some dentures are made with materials that are highly porous or prone to cracking. These surfaces can easily host millions of bacteria that irritate your gums and cause painful infections.

TMJ Damage

No matter how much you reline your denture, it may never give you relief if the pain is centered on your TMJ. Your jaw can suffer serious damage if you’ve been chewing with an uneven bite for years. You may need an entirely new denture that’s designed to balance out your jaw.

Get Help for Your Denture Pain!

Visit a denture dentist for a checkup to see what could be causing your pain. You’ll learn suggestions for getting immediate relief as well as long-term solutions for preventing future discomfort.

Posted on behalf of:
Elegant Smiles
1955 Cliff Valley Way NE #100
Brookhaven, GA 30329
404-634-4224

Sep
13

Eat This Instead of That: 5 Alternative Ways to Enjoy Your Favorite Foods with Dentures

Posted in Dentures

New dentures can put a bit of a damper on your diet. But all’s not lost—a little creativity is all you need to enjoy your favorite flavors in denture-friendly bites until you get a bit more proficient with chewing.

 

 

Instead of Tortillas, Try Tortilla Soup

 

Get that south-of-the-border flavor fix in a hearty tortilla soup where the meat and tortillas are shredded up into soft and manageable bits. You won’t have to use your denture too much to enjoy this!

Instead of a Green Salad, Try a Green Smoothie

Fresh veggies are essential to your health but they’re almost impossible to eat without teeth. Thank goodness for blenders! Whip up your favorite greens with some juice or yogurt for a drinkable salad.

Instead of Chicken Wings, Try Chicken Wing Dip

There’s just nothing that can replace those messy wings on game day. But chicken wing dip is a close second! By heating cooked shredded chicken meat with hot sauce, cheeses, and ranch dressing, you can create a flavorful concoction that’s boneless and denture-friendly.

Instead of Steak, Try Beef Stew

You may always have a hard time grinding up meats with your denture. Opt for slow-cooked and stewed meats that “melts in your mouth” instead.

Instead of Carrots, Try Sweet Potatoes

Are fresh carrots too hard and slippery to chew with your denture? Roasted or boiled sweet potatoes pack a similar amount of the nutrients found in carrots and are much softer to eat.

For the most part, wearing dentures means you’ll have to find new ways to cut up and soften your foods for easy chewing. Your dentist can give you some more suggestions for a healthy and flavorful denture diet as you adjust to your new prosthesis.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Aug
5

Why Your Dentures Make a Whistling Noise When You Talk

Posted in Dentures

Do your dentures whistle whenever you try to pronounce words with “s” sounds?

A noisy denture can be so embarrassing that it may impact your self-confidence and limit your involvement in social situations.

If you can determine the cause behind the whistling, then you may be able to prevent it and speak with confidence.

Getting Used to a New Denture

Your tongue has had years of practice in pronouncing “s” sounds. It knows exactly which point on the roof of your mouth to contact to create the right sound. It comes so naturally that you don’t even have to think about how you do it!

Wearing a denture can drastically change the texture of your mouth. Your tongue may need to relearn where it has to go in order to pronounce a clear “s” sound. Until you figure it out, the air may escape with a whistle whenever you try to pronounce your s’s, causing a slur.

You might struggle with relearning pronunciation to adapt to a new denture. Whether it’s your first set of false teeth or a new one to replace your original denture, a little practice can help you make the transition to clearer and more confident speech.

Adjust Your Denture

What if you can’t speak those “s” sounds clearly no matter how much you practice?

The problem may boil down to a subtle design flaw in your denture. The part that covers the roof of your mouth just behind your front teeth may be too thick or too thin. Alternatively, the front teeth may be positioned a little too far forward.

Visit a denture dentist to find out how you can adjust your denture for clearer speech.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Aug
1

What to Do if Your Dentures Make You Gag

Posted in Dentures

Dentures are supposed to help you enjoy your food. It’s ironic when they upset your stomach by triggering your gag reflex. Do dentures make you gag? Finding out why is the first step to getting some relief.

Why Your Dentures Make You Gag

The human mouth is very sensitive to objects that aren’t teeth, tongue, or food…and some people are more sensitive than others. Things like a toothbrush, sports mouth guard, or even a denture can cause some people to gag.

Gagging is very common in the weeks after you first get a denture. Gagging may even be accompanied by excess salivation. It simply takes time for your mouth to get used to having a foreign object in it. After a little while, you should feel comfortable wearing your denture.

What if the urge to gag doesn’t go away?

Prevent Gagging with Dentures

Try inserting your denture in different ways. Your dentist can show you how to put in a denture without setting off your gag reflex. You can also try repositioning your tongue inside your mouth to stabilize your denture so that it doesn’t shift around.

If nothing you try seems to work, then talk with your dentist about the possibility of adjusting your denture. It could be that your appliance is too loose or a little too long for your mouth. This is especially common with upper dentures where the plate reaches out too far onto the soft palate. A quick adjustment could get you a better fit with zero gagging.

Dentures aren’t supposed to make you gag! With a little practice and some help from your dentist, you can enjoy life with your new smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Jun
21

5 Ways to Prevent Sores While Wearing a Denture

Posted in Dentures

Here are five of the best ways to prevent and relieve painful denture sores and stomatitis under your “plate.”

Apply a Denture Cream

If your denture is new or a bit loose, you may have a hard time keeping it in place. The chafing can cause gum irritation. To prevent this, apply a thin layer of denture cream when you’re about to put your denture in. Remember to clean out the old adhesive material every day when you take out your prosthesis.

Check the Fit of Your Denture

A loose denture results in an uneven bite and lots of movement. Slipping and sliding can rub painfully against your gums. The only way to make your denture fits comfortably is to see your dentist or prosthodontist for an adjustment.

Clean Your Denture Daily

Bacteria, fungi, and food debris build up underneath dentures and cause irritation to the tissue underneath. You must remove your denture every night before you go to bed to give it a thorough cleaning. This process removes the microbes that can cause sores.

Clean Your Mouth Daily

Germs and food left in your mouth will only continue to build up underneath a clean denture when you put it back in. Wipe out your mouth with a soft brush or cloth, rinse well, and brush and floss any remaining teeth you have. Do this at least twice a day or after every meal.

Take Your Denture Out at Night

Your mouth and gums need time to “breathe” without being covered by a denture. Let your plate soak overnight and use this time to give your mouth a rest.

Get more denture care tips from your dentist at your next checkup.

Posted on behalf of:
Smiles by Seese
610 Jetton St #250
Davidson, NC 28036
(704) 895-5095

Jun
19

5 Reasons Why Your Lower Denture May Be Loose

Posted in Dentures

Is a loose lower denture ruining your ability to enjoy a meal or laugh around your friends?

A poor-fitting denture can be both painful and embarrassing. To make it fit properly again you need to first figure out what’s making it loose.

Here are a few possibilities you should consider.

  1. Your Denture Isn’t Properly Contoured

Dentures need to have little notches carved into the sides to accommodate tissue attachments. Your cheeks and lips are attached to your jaw by thin strong cables of skin called frenula. Your denture won’t rest securely on your jaw if it doesn’t have spaces to fit around those attachments.

  1. Your Denture Edges Are Too Thick or Thin

Dentures edges that are too thick, thin, short, or long will make your denture unstable.

  1. Your Impressions Weren’t Taken Correctly

Dentures are designed from a mold taken from your mouth. The dentist uses a soft impression material to capture the shape of your mouth. If the mold wasn’t taken with just the right amount of pressure, that could result in design flaws and a loose lower denture.

  1. Your Denture Teeth Are Uneven

Perhaps your denture fits just fine, but the upper and lower teeth don’t match up correctly. An uneven bite could knock your lower denture out of place.

  1. Your Denture Is Too Old

If your lower denture is suddenly loose after years of fitting perfectly, then that could mean you need a new one. The bone in your jaw shrinks under years of pressure from wearing such a prosthesis. Eventually, the denture doesn’t fit anymore and becomes loose.

Ask your dentist about solutions for a loose denture.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Jun
19

Here’s Why Dentures Aren’t the Solution to Your Dental Problems

Posted in Dentures

Have you ever wished you could just have all of your teeth pulled in favor of getting dentures?

Sacrificing your natural teeth for dentures isn’t exactly the easy way out when it comes to keeping your mouth healthy.

Dentures Require Daily Care

Having no teeth to floss doesn’t let you off the hook when it comes to oral hygiene. Your denture requires daily cleaning, soaking, and you’ll still have to rinse off your gums. You might even find the routine a bit more tedious than just brushing your natural teeth.

Dentures Can Cause Problems, Too

It’s not natural to have an acrylic appliance pressing on your gums for hours at a time. Dentures can cause irritation and swelling in oral tissues and can even trap pathogens that cause infections, especially if they don’t fit well.

It’s Harder to Eat with Dentures

Dentures cannot compare with natural teeth when it comes to eating. Your bite strength will be reduced by and you’ll have to say “no” to certain foods until you get a lot more practice.

Dentures Can Change Your Appearance

For some time after getting dentures they’ll help support the height of your smile. But as the years go by, the weight of a prosthesis will cause your jaw to shrink (resorb.) This results in a short, sunken chin and loose skin. The smile shrinking process doesn’t happen nearly as much when there are natural tooth roots supporting the jaw.

Dentures serve an important purpose as teeth replacements for those who ultimately have to part with their teeth. But this doesn’t make them the preferable alternative to natural teeth.

Ask your dentist whether getting dentures is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

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