Dental Tips Blog

Jul
12

Here’s Why You’re Getting Food Stuck in Your Teeth

Ever wonder why that one annoying tooth keeps catching bits of food?

One of the following situations may be to blame…

Decay

Cavities cause roughness and hollow spots in teeth which trap food debris. You may notice this particularly if the top of a molar keeps getting doughy bread and crackers and pasta wedged into it.

Gum Disease

Inflamed gums pull away from tooth surfaces creating gaps for food and bacteria to accumulate. As the infection progresses, those gaps deepen and form the perfectly-sized slot against the tooth root for popcorn kernels to slip into.

Open Contact

Healthy teeth are supposed to be in snug contact with their neighbors. If you have a couple teeth with a gap between them, no matter how small, food will find its way in. This is especially troublesome when the gap is big enough for food to get stuck, but too small for your tongue to wiggle loose the debris.

Flossing

No, this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be flossing. But if you aren’t flossing correctly, you could actually be shoving food particles deeper below your gums every time you do floss.

Make sure that when you floss you wrap it around your tooth crown in a snug C-shape before gently shimmying it below the gum line. Then gently shimmy it upwards to pull plaque and food clear of the gums.

Get some relief by:

  • Gently flossing the area
  • Using a water flosser
  • Rinsing with warm salt water
  • Having your teeth restored to close up a gap
  • Scheduling regular dental cleanings and checkups

To find out what’s causing your dinner time distress, visit your local dentist. You’ll learn the best ways for preventing food from getting trapped in your teeth.

Posted on behalf of:
Bayshore Dental Center
810 W Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd #2900
Seffner, FL 33584
(813) 330-2006

May
20

Are You Using Toothpaste the Right Way?

Toothpaste may sound like it’s too simple to be particular about. But between dental cleanings and checkups, effective use of toothpaste can play a big role in maintaining your oral health.

Just A Dot Will Do

Toothpaste packaging and advertisements make it look like more is better when it comes to toothpaste.

Remember, however, that those big globs of paste are purely for promo purposes. They show off the color and texture to make the product look more appealing.

In reality, adults only need a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste every time they brush. Toddlers under the age of 3 get a rice grain-sized smear.

Too much toothpaste could actually make your toothbrush bristles too slippery to scrub your teeth.

Don’t Rinse Too Much

It’s a habit for most of us to rinse out with water after brushing with a mouth full of foamy toothpaste.

But did you know that if you rinse you’re only getting 50% of the benefits?

Toothpaste helps clean teeth. But it also contains ingredients to inhibit germ growth or strengthen enamel. When you leave that last bit of minty residue on your teeth, it helps freshen your breath and gives the toothpaste more time to boost your oral health.

It’s What’s Inside That Counts

Not just any toothpaste will work. Sure, you won’t get sick from using the wrong kind, but it helps to choose a formula that will address your oral concerns.

For example, some toothpastes meet needs like:

  • Teeth whitening
  • Anti-cavity
  • Anti-gingivitis
  • Sensitivity
  • Remineralizing enamel

Take a minute to check the packaging of your next tube of toothpaste to make sure it does what it claims.

Ask your dentist for tips on selecting a toothpaste that’s right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Apr
22

4 Reasons Your Dentist Wants You to Floss Daily

Flossing isn’t a “dentist thing.” It’s a health thing. Here are four reasons your dentist is hammering the flossing issue.

  1. Your cleaning appointments will be easier for you.

Daily flossing reduces buildup between teeth. If you don’t floss, you’re more likely to develop tartar, or calculus, deposits.

These rock-like formations can only be removed during a professional dental cleaning. The bigger and tougher the calculus deposits, the more your dentist or hygienist will have to work at removing them. That doesn’t make for a very pleasant cleaning session.

  1. Flossing could lower your risk for heart problems.

Along with tartar, bacteria also like to hide out between teeth. Certain germs are responsible for triggering gum inflammation.

If bacteria cause inflammation in your gums, then they can travel in your bloodstream and affect parts of your arteries. This could potentially cause a dangerous blood clot.

Preventative flossing disrupts those bacteria, lowering your risk for gum disease, and thereby reducing your risk for other serious complications.

  1. Your cavity risk will go down.

Any little bit you do to disturb bacteria between your teeth is going to keep the cavity-causing germs from wearing away enamel. Besides that, flossing removes food debris that your toothbrush misses. Those leftover bits could contain acids that only erode enamel further.

  1. You’ll have better breath.

Bacteria and leftover food get lodged between teeth. It’s just a fact: the more buildup between teeth, the more you’ll smell.

Flossing to keep your breath fresh isn’t just a courtesy to your dentist when he or she checks your teeth. Others around you will thank you, as well!

Schedule a dental checkup to get some tips on easier flossing.

Posted on behalf of:
ConfiDenT
11550 Webb Bridge Way, Suite 1
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 772-0994

Mar
27

Going on Vacation? Get Your Teeth Checked First, Dentists Urge

When you’re making plans for a trip out of town, visiting a dentist isn’t exactly at the top of your list of priorities.

It’s not exactly reasonable to head to the dental office every time you take a roadtrip. But what if you have more serious plans in the works…say, international travel? Getting a dental checkup could be the smartest thing you do before your trip!

For one thing, it’s a pain and inconvenience to develop a toothache while you’re out of the country.

Where would you go for treatment in a dental emergency?

Who could you trust to safely repair your smile?

What about all those expensive tours and activities you booked? That dental pain won’t let you enjoy a minute of what you planned.

There’s also this thing called “barodontalgia” that’s worth considering.

Barodontalgia is tooth pain that results from a change in pressure. A previously unnoticed fracture in a tooth can suddenly explode with throbbing pain at an extremely inconvenient time. Some call this issue “tooth squeeze.”

What changes in pressure, you ask? Flying. Commercial jets fly at an altitude of around 30,000 feet.

Tooth squeeze starts to be felt at altitudes over 9,000 feet.

How does a killing toothache on a nine-hour flight sound?

If your vacation package includes scuba diving at any tropical destinations, then that can trigger a tooth issue, as well. Atmospheric pressure increases the deeper you go.

So consider this your friendly reminder to make sure your teeth are good before you head out! The point of a vacation is to forget your worries, for a while. Tooth pain will only add unwanted stress.

Schedule a dental checkup before your next exotic excursion!

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Mar
6

4 Reasons to Schedule that Dental Check Up Right Now

It’s time to stop putting it off. Here are four reasons to pick up the phone in the next five minutes and call your dentist for a visit.

  1. You Have the Time.

Given the choice, which would you prefer?

A.) Have a routine dental cleaning and checkup at your convenience

B.) Use up a sick day at work to call in for an emergency root canal

Surprisingly, most people somehow make time for option B.

It’s simple, really. Get it over with so that you can stay more in control of your life.

  1. Your Health Depends on It.

Many a routine dental visit has revealed health problems patients never knew they had. Your mouth is connected to the rest of your body. Dentists know what is and isn’t normal in the oral environment. A simple dental examination could uncover early signs that you should see your doctor.

  1. You Can Take Advantage of Your Insurance Benefits.

Insurance benefits usually reset at the start of the new year. If you have a dental checkup now, you can get a good idea of what your oral health priorities are. Your dentist will help you create a to-do list that suits your schedule and budget and lets you strategically maximize your benefits right through the end of December.

  1. You Just Never Know What’s Lurking Beneath the Surface.

A lot of dental issues can be kept manageable (and affordable) just by catching them early enough. Routine x-rays, examinations, screenings, and preventative treatments will keep you on top of your oral health and minimize any unpleasant surprises.

So what are you waiting for? Contact a dental office near you today.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Feb
16

What’s Making My Kid’s Teeth Orange?

You’ve just got to love those baby pearly-whites!

Until they become not-so-white.

Your child’s baby teeth are gradually being replaced by adult ones as their smile matures. But lately, that beautiful white smile has turned dull and rather . . . orange.

Now you’re worried. What happened?

Orange stain on teeth is typically attributed to specific kinds of bacteria that can get pretty colorful themselves. When they collect in high numbers, they leave a characteristic orangey-yellow stain on the teeth.

These germs are associated with food debris and poor oral hygiene. Children’s mouths are the perfect host for these bacteria for a few reasons:

  • Kids are notoriously bad at brushing regularly (it can be like “pulling teeth” to get them to do so!)
  • Young children often don’t have the needed dexterity to move their toothbrush where needed
  • Food debris quickly gets trapped in the messy mix of outgoing baby teeth and incoming adult ones

What can you do if you notice your kid’s teeth turning orange?

Start off with a trip to the dental office. The orange should come right off in a thorough teeth cleaning. While you’re there, chat with the dentist and dental hygienist to get tips on improving your child’s oral hygiene.

Keep in mind that this orange plaque doesn’t just discolor teeth – it can also wear away enamel and cause cavities. That’s why it’s a good thing to worry about the color of your kid’s teeth. If you notice something a little off about your little one’s smile, you could have a potential problem on your hands.

Schedule a dental checkup and cleaning asap! For your child, a beautiful smile is a healthy one.

Posted on behalf of:
Smiles by Seese
610 Jetton St #250
Davidson, NC 28036
(704) 895-5095

Jan
10

Do You Need to Brush Your Dog’s Teeth?

For some of us, our dog is more than our best friend – he or she is family.  We’ll do anything for our cold-nosed companions! True dog lovers will go out of their way to get the perfect food formulas, the perfect accessories, and the perfect hair cut for their pets.

One important element of dog health is dental care. Yes, pooches need that too, and once again, those die-hard dog fans are already all over that.

Caring For Dog’s Teeth: What To Know

Dogs are not very susceptible to cavities. But like us, they can develop the heavy tartar buildup and bad breath that accompany gum disease. If not treated, gum inflammation can lead to serious health problems. Daily brushing is a great way to prevent bacterial buildup in your dog’s mouth.

What You Need

A pet store will have toothbrushes and toothpastes appropriate for dogs. NEVER use human toothpaste! Most of our toothpastes contain fluoride which is great for our teeth, but like chocolate, it’s not meant for dogs. Hard chew toys are good for cleansing dog teeth.

What To Do

Start small. You can ease your dog into brushing by starting when they’re young. Brush only for as long as they’ll tolerate, slowly increasing the brushing time each day. Reward your pooch’s cooperation with a treat.

Don’t forget that you need dental care, too! People need routine dental cleanings and checkups twice a year and daily brushing and flossing. We’re more prone to dental health problems than dogs are. To find out what your teeth need to stay healthy and strong, visit your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Amber Hills Dental
771 E. Horizon Dr
Suite 176-180
Henderson, NV 89015
702-831-4686

Dec
19

5 Foods You May Not Realize Are Destroying Your Enamel

Tooth enamel is one of the hardest substances in the body. Yet, it can be gradually worn away by the most surprising things. Foods with acid in them can cause enamel to thin out, making it prone to sensitivity and decay.

Coffee

Java, joe, hot, or cold, call it what you want and take it how you want. Coffee is right up there on the list of acidic foods and there’s a lot of it out there!

Tomato Sauce

Pasta-lovers, be warned! Fresh or simmered into a sauce, tomatoes find their way into our diet in manifold ways. They’re also highly acidic. Take a break from the ketchup, pizza, and spaghetti once in a while and give your enamel a break!

Bagels

What’s so acidic about a bagel? This one’s on the list to remind you that simple sugary carbohydrates are actually harmful to enamel. Doughy products like bagels are apt to stick in and around your teeth long after you eat them.

Citrus Fruits

High in vitamin C, these fruits are great for your health. Eaten straight-up too often, however, they will leave a mark on your teeth.

Vinegar

At this point, you’re not surprised to see tangy acidic vinegar on the list. But you should stop from time to time to check and see just how often this enamel-eating substance winds up on your plate. Vinegar is present in bottled sauces, marinades, dressings, pickles, and more.

Enjoy acidic foods in moderation. Pair them with less-acidic foods and rinse well with water after a meal. Visit your dentist often for routine dental checkups and cleanings to make sure your teeth are holding up against the effects of acid in your diet.

Posted on behalf of:
Mundo Dentistry
3463 US-21 #101
Fort Mill, SC 29715
(704) 825-2018

Sep
22

Parents, Don’t Become Guilty of Dental Neglect!

Like any other loving parent, you hate to see your child suffer. Even so, too many loving parents make the same mistake of concluding their kids’ baby teeth aren’t as important as the permanent ones. This view usually leads to dental neglect.

What Is Dental Neglect?

Willfully overlooking the treatment needs of your child’s teeth and mouth adds up to serious infection. Neglect is learning that your child needs a filling or improved oral hygiene but then doing nothing to help them.

Why Your Child’s Dental Health Matters

Baby teeth seem unimportant since they’re going to fall out. Most children aren’t huge fans of brushing and flossing, anyway. But those first teeth act as placeholders for the adult ones to follow.

Letting baby teeth just rot away can cause your child unnecessary pain and pave the way for more serious problems involving adult teeth.

When Choosing Treatment for Your Child

It’s normal to feel disappointed when you hear your little one needs a costly procedure. But your dentist is neither implying you’re a bad parent nor suggesting unnecessary treatment just to make a profit.

At a dental checkup, your child can be accurately diagnosed with x-rays and other tools. It’s also the best way for you to learn how to prevent oral health problems.

So the best way to avoid dental neglect is through prevention and following a dentist’s recommendations.

Still don’t like the diagnosis you’re hearing? Before ruling out dental treatment for your child, consider getting a second opinion. This way, you can be sure of acting in your child’s best interests!

Get a head start on your child’s oral well-being by contacting a local dentist to schedule a checkup.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverheart Family Dentistry
8618 Mexico Road
O’Fallon, MO 63366
(636) 205-4045

Aug
30

What Does a Dental Hygienist Do?

You might be surprised to learn that a hygienist’s job involves more than just teeth cleaning. Understanding your local dental hygienist’s role in healthcare could even motivate you to make some changes in your oral hygiene routine.

Hygiene – Not A Job Just Anyone Can Do!

Hygienists are registered and licensed in various ways depending on the state they live in. But one thing they all have in common is a solid education. Most dental hygiene programs are rigorous 2-4 year long college courses that are very similar to nursing.

Dental hygienists also get hands-on training in a disciplined environment to prepare them for their work responsibilities. As a result, they pick up skills and habits like:

  • Cleanliness
  • Attention to detail
  • A sharp eye
  • Compassion
  • Adaptability
  • Good manual dexterity

If you had to pick someone to clean your teeth with small and very sharp tools, wouldn’t you want someone who fits that description?

Your hygienist is a respected professional in the medical community.

Beyond The Brush

A dental hygienist’s work doesn’t end with cleaning teeth.

Perhaps most important of all is their role in educating patients on the importance of oral hygiene. This aspect often has them actively promoting preventive dental care in schools, nursing homes, and underserved areas.

For the record, your hygienist doesn’t get on your case about flossing for no reason! He or she wants you to understand the deeper connection between clean gums and a healthy body.

If you pay attention to what your dental hygienist has to say, you’ll learn lots of practical tips that can make your flossing and brushing routine worlds easier – and improve your overall health.

Posted on behalf of:
Gainesville Dental Group
1026 Thompson Bridge Rd
Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 297-0401

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