Dental Tips Blog

Aug
5

How to Safely Replace a Dental Crown if It Falls Off

Posted in Crowns

What should you do if your dental crown suddenly pops off? Here are the steps that dentists recommend.

Recover the Crown and Check It

Locate your crown and any pieces that may come off with it. If your crown is loose, try to remove it entirely. This will lower the chances that it will come off and disappear during your next meal.

Look over your crown for any signs of damage. Check to see if there are any pieces of tooth left inside the cap.

The next step is simply to call your dentist to find out the earliest time you can come in to have your crown replaced. If it’s going to be more than a day before you can get to the dental office, then move on to the next steps.

Clean Out Your Crown 

Make sure your crown is free of food and debris on the inside. Scrub the inside with a toothbrush, rinse it, and dry it. You should also clean the tooth it fell off of.

Check the Fit

Try out your crown in your mouth. Put it over the original tooth and lightly bite down to check the fit. Make sure it’s oriented in the right direction by comparing it with the neighboring teeth.

Cement Your Cap

Using a temporary dental cement from a nearby drugstore, replace the crown on your prepared tooth. Wipe away the excess cement and let it set for a couple of hours before you eat anything.

Temporarily cementing your crown in place is the best way to protect it for a day or two.

Get to a dental office as soon as you can to get your crown reattached permanently.

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050

Aug
4

5 Common Dental Crown Problems

Posted in Crowns

A dental crown usually means salvation for a decayed or broken tooth. But on occasion, some discomfort may persist after the procedure.

Here are five of the most common complications that you could experience.

Tooth Sensitivity

Your tooth will have to be significantly trimmed down to fit a crown. It will understandably be sore and sensitive to temperature changes for the first few days after getting a cap. This can also happen with crowns that are just a tiny bit too short. If even a small amount of the tooth root is exposed then you will feel some increased sensitivity.

Toothache

The trauma of preparing a tooth for a crown can cause some inflammation inside the nerve chamber. This swelling should resolve on its own, as the tooth adjusts to its new shape.

Crown Too High

A tall restoration or too much cement could make your capped tooth higher than it was before. You may not notice the difference right away, but over time, the height change can affect your bite.

Sore Gums Around a Crown

Getting a crown can be a little rough on the surrounding gum tissue. Any irritation should quickly heal within a few days but swelling that persists for weeks could be a sign that there’s excess dental cement left under the gums.

Cracked Root

Crowning a severely cracked tooth can be a gamble. The crack may get deeper over time as you bite down on your crowned tooth and put pressure on it. Once the crack extends into the root, the crown won’t be of much help. An extraction is likely the only way to get relief.

Ask your dentist how the benefits of getting a crown outweigh the risks of side-effects.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

Jul
29

How Long Can You Expect Crowns on Front Teeth to Last?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns are beautiful. They can transform your smile by covering up imperfections on your front teeth. They’re also valuable restorations as they provide an essential investment in your weak or decayed enamel. Naturally, you want crowned front teeth to last as long as possible.

Just how long can you reasonably expect?

How Long Dental Crowns Can Last

Most insurance companies will pay for a crown once in a five-year period. This means that they expect a crown to last that long whether it’s on a front or back tooth. Any concerned dentist would be disappointed to see a crown last less than 10 years. Many caps on front teeth last upwards of 15 years since those teeth don’t experience as much wear and tear as the back ones.

There is no guarantee, however, that your crown will last even five years if you don’t take proper care of it.

Make the Crown on Your Front Tooth Last

Dental crowns don’t just fall apart or fall off on their own. There’s usually an external factor that causes crowns to fail. Poor oral hygiene and habits like nail biting can shorten a restoration’s lifespan.

Do the following to ensure that your crown lasts as long as possible:

  • Brush and floss your crown daily
  • Use fluoride products
  • Wear mouth guards if you play sports or grind your teeth in your sleep
  • Avoid using your front teeth as tools to bite into hard foods or tear open packages

As it turns out, you have a lot of control over how long a crown on your front tooth can last.

Learn more about beautiful strong crowns for restoring front teeth by contacting a cosmetic dentist in your area.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Apr
24

What Are Dental Crowns For?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns are an important and well-known dental procedure, just about as popular as fillings.

Why would you need one? Here are the main reasons to get a dental crown.

Cavities That Are Too Big for Fillings

Fillings can weaken teeth if they’re too large. So some cavities automatically need to be upgraded to a crown, to protect the entire tooth.

After Root Canals

A root canal can save your tooth, but it also weakens it. Teeth that have root canals need to be covered with a crown to help them withstand biting and chewing.

Restoring Implants

Dental implants are just the metal “roots” that go into your bone. They have to be restored, or finished off, with a dental crown to get the look and feel of a natural tooth.

Strengthening Cracked or Worn Teeth

Do you grind your teeth a lot? Is your enamel worn down from acid exposure? Did you crack a tooth in an accident? You may need a dental crown to protect what’s left of your teeth.

Enhancing Smiles

A dental crown may be the only answer for a tooth that’s severely misshapen or deeply stained.

Anchoring Dental Bridges

Bridges span the gap between teeth to fill in empty spaces. But they need something to hold onto. Dental bridges rest on natural teeth with the help of dental crowns.

Treating Baby Teeth

Baby teeth can be difficult to place fillings on. This is because the teeth are small and delicate, and the patients have a hard time sitting still. Dentists often place stainless steel dental crowns on decayed baby teeth to get them through a few more years of use.

Is a dental crown right for you? Find out by visiting a restorative dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

Mar
9

Why Did My Dental Crown Fail?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns don’t last forever, but you do reasonably expect to get several years out of your new dental restoration.

You’re understandably disappointed whenever a crown fails prematurely. What causes some dental caps to so?

Crown Fabrication Error

It’s not common for crowns to come off after a dentist carefully puts them in place. But if yours pops off soon after placement, you should see your dentist to find out if it was just an issue with the cementing process.

Sometimes, a dental crown can fail because it’s just a little bit too high. Even a subtle height discrepancy (we’re talking fractions of a millimeter) between your crown and your other teeth can cause serious problems. Eventually, your crown can loosen up because of premature wear and fall off or crack.

Recurrent Decay

You play an important role in making your dental crown last. If you can’t keep your crowned tooth clean, then it will fail, just like any other tooth. Your capped tooth is not immune to decay; cavity can still form at the edge and then spread underneath the margins, making it come off. That’s why flossing and brushing capped teeth is so important.

Cracked Dental Crown

Your tooth enamel can handle small cracks. Teeth are even designed to tightly close up small cracks. But dental crowns can’t do that. Once cracked, they’re compromised for good.

A crown can crack from trauma, chewing hard foods, or grinding against the opposing teeth. Once your crown cracks, it’s only a matter of time before bacteria slip inside and eat away the underlying tooth which loosens the restoration.

See a restorative dentist for a check-up if you’re worried about your dental crown.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Oct
19

Can a Tooth Still Get a Cavity if It Has a Crown?

Posted in Crowns

Your tooth may look well sealed-up after getting a pristine new dental crown. But the fact is, it’s not invincible.

Watch Out for the Margin

You’ve just had to go through a lot of “work” and possibly even a root canal. Before that, the tooth may have had a large cavity. You’d like to think your tooth is now set for life!

Dental crowns, however, have their limits. They only cover the tooth to a point that’s just below the gum line. Where the crown edge meets the tooth is called the margin.

Your dentist makes that margin as smooth as possible. But it’s still a prime area for collecting bacteria that cause cavities. When a cavity starts at the margin, it works its way under the tooth undetected.

Oral Hygiene a Must

To avoid getting a cavity under your new crown, you must do your part.

Brush daily with a fluoride toothpaste and carefully floss around your crown (and other teeth) to remove plaque.

If you are at high-risk for tooth decay, your dentist may recommend that you extend the life of your crown by using a prescription fluoride gel.

No Crowns Last Forever

Gold crowns last a long time. Metal ones hold up to wear and tear. Porcelain crowns are strong and beautiful.

But there isn’t yet a crown that’s guaranteed to protect your tooth indefinitely.

That’s why you need to schedule routine dental check-ups. A dentist can evaluate your crown with examinations and x-rays to check for signs of weakness or decay in the tooth underneath.

So don’t put off your next dental visit! It could be just what your crown needs to avoid getting a cavity.

Posted on behalf of:
Les Belles NYC Dentistry
420 Lexington Ave #228
New York, NY 10170
212-804-8884

 

Sep
17

Keep Your Dental Crown Strong with These 5 Tips

Posted in Crowns

No dental crown will last forever.

But with the proper care and keeping, your next dental crown could last for 15 or 20 years or more.

Brush and Floss

A capped tooth may feel safe from getting a cavity since it’s sealed off. It’s anything but, however. The margin where the crown meets your tooth is still a weak point where bacteria can sneak in and decay the tooth inside. A new cavity will weaken your crown and make it totally useless.

Pay special attention to crowned teeth while brushing and flossing to prevent plaque bacteria from building up around them.

Get Lots of Fluoride

Fluoride is a mineral that strengthens enamel. It can help prevent cavities from starting around the margin of your crown.

Don’t Use Crowns as Tools

Crowns are strong enough to hold up to the regular forces of biting and chewing. But they are just as prone to breaking as natural teeth if you use them as tools to tear off tags or open packages.

Avoid Hard Foods

Chewing ice and crunching on very hard items on a regular basis will weaken a porcelain crown. Treat it with as much love as you would any other tooth!

See Your Dentist

Regular dental checkups are vital to ensure that your crown is holding up to the forces of everyday wear and tear. Your dentist can alert you to signs that your crown’s days are running out.

Restorative dental products and technology are improving all the time. Your dentist is a great resource for learning more about long-lasting dental restorations. Ask your local dentist about how you can keep you next dental crown for years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
Smiles by Seese
610 Jetton St #250
Davidson, NC 28036
(704) 895-5095

Sep
9

Why Your Dental Crown Feels More Sensitive in the Winter

Icy air doesn’t mix well with sensitive teeth.

Your teeth are covered with tiny pores that expand in warm temperatures and contract in cold ones. This is a natural reaction to protect the nerves inside teeth.

It doesn’t come as a surprise to you that cold air can create a zinging sensation in teeth. But you may be wondering why your crowned tooth is suddenly more sensitive than the others.

Sensitive Dental Crowns

Is your dental crown new? It can take time for a tooth to “settle” with its new covering. Your tooth experienced quite an adjustment when the outer layer was removed to make way for a crown.

In cooler temperatures, your newly-crowned tooth might complain a bit more than your other teeth!

If you’ve had your crown for years, then sudden cold sensitivity could be a sign of trouble. It may mean that your crown has worn to the point of breaking or loosening. This would once again expose your sensitive tooth to the outside world after so much time under a restoration.

What You Can Do

The next priority on your list is getting relief from the sensitivity.

You can try:

  • Breathing through your nose rather than your mouth
  • Avoiding hot drinks while outside in icy temperatures
  • Using a desensitizing toothpaste
  • Cutting back on acidic and sugary foods that wear down enamel
  • Not using OTC teeth bleaching kits
  • Brushing gently so as to not cause gum recession around tooth crowns

These tips may not be enough. You should also see your dentist to have your crown examined for signs of failure. If everything checks out, ask for more tips on keeping your smile toasty in cool weather!

Posted on behalf of:
Group Health Dental
230 W 41st St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 398-9690

Apr
22

Why Are Dental Crowns So Expensive?

Posted in Crowns

Dental “caps” seem so small that most people wonder why they tend to cost three digits or more.

Are crowns really worth it? Why do they cost more than a filling?

A Crown Costs the Dentist, Too

Small though they are, dental crowns require a lot of behind-the-scenes work and support. Your dentist has to pay up front and help fund expenses such as:

  • Crown materials
  • Lab fees
  • Sterilization and other clinical equipment
  • Salaries for office staff
  • Rent/building expenses

Which Kind of Crown?

Varying crown materials and manufacturing techniques affect the price tag. Usually, the cheaper you go, the lower the quality. Crowns made from pure porcelain tend to cost more, but they look and feel the best.

What kind of crown you select doesn’t just depend on your budget, however.

You’ll need to make a decision based upon what’s best for your teeth. A poor choice made in haste because it’s the cheapest could end up costing you far more down the road to fix it.

How to Afford Your Next Dental Crown

With excellent oral care, hopefully you can put off getting a crown for a long time.

But if you end up needing one for your next cavity, you want to be prepared. Your local dental office can help you out here.

Your dentist will explain which restorative options are right for you. Then you can weigh your options in terms of cost versus quality. Whether you have insurance or not, the dental office staff will help you work out a payment plan that suits your circumstances.

Crowns may seem expensive, but a good quality one is a wise investment. Ask your dentist about other ways to afford a vital dental crown to save your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Feb
13

What If You Don’t Have Time to Get a Dental Cap?

Posted in Crowns

One of the biggest reasons people put off dental treatment is because it can be inconvenient to a busy schedule.

Getting a dental crown, for example, can be a two-visit process. If there’s a holdup, then you may have to come in for a few additional appointments.

You just can’t afford to take that kind of time off from work.

Happily, more and more dental offices are turning to technology that cuts a huge chunk of time out of the crown-making process. This saves both you and your dentist a lot of time and money.

Dental Crowns in A Day

When technology makes advancements, dentistry is never far behind. Many dental practices now feature an on-site machine that manufactures dental crowns and other restorations right there in the office.

Additionally, these machines are often connected to computers with specialized design software. Instead of taking a messy impression of your tooth, the dentist simply scans it with an intraoral camera. The 3D image goes straight to the computer where your dentist can create the pattern.

The design goes right to the on-site milling machine which neatly carves the final restoration out of a solid piece of ceramic.

The best part? All of this can be done in just one visit.

Is A Single-Visit Crown Right For You?

These in-office one-appointment dental caps have been a lifesaver for many patients who are short on time. But keep in mind that this process has some limitations depending on what material or type of restoration is best for your tooth.

So, the next time you need a crown, ask your dentist whether this single-appointment crown technology is available near you.

Posted on behalf of:
Gold Hill Dentistry
2848 Pleasant Road #104
Fort Mill,  South Carolina 29708
(803) 566-8055

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