Dental Tips Blog

Sep
10

Extra Charges You May See Added to Your Dental Crown Bill

Posted in Crowns

You’re surprised to get your bill and see a list of multiple other procedures in addition to your crown.

Those supportive procedures are necessary to successfully placing a crown. Here are some of the extra charges that you may see associated with your treatment.

Crown Buildup

If your tooth is weak or has little structure left to support a crown, then your dentist may need to build it up with filling material first. Some dentists can include the cost of this procedure with your total treatment estimate. But if you end up needing it unexpectedly after your treatment starts, then this can show up as an additional “major” dental service on your bill.

Root Canal

A root canal is another major expense that is separate from the cost of your crown. As with a post or core buildup, your tooth may unexpectedly need root canal therapy. Your dentist will let you know as you go along whether one is necessary, but it’s usually planned for in advance.

X-Rays

You might see a few diagnostic x-rays listed on your crown procedure bill. This is very typical.

Initial Exam

Did you see your dentist for a toothache and come out with a dental crown? That initial exam to check your tooth and assess it for a cap may show up on your bill.

When in Doubt, Get a Second Opinion

If you see suspicious additional charges to your dental bill or if the dentist can’t satisfactorily explain why you need a certain procedure, get a second opinion.

You can minimize confusion and unpleasant surprises by asking your dentist at the outset for clarification of exactly what your total treatment estimate should be.

Posted on behalf of:
Green Dental of Alexandria
1725 Duke St
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 549-1725

Sep
9

Why You Need a Crown Instead of a Filling

Posted in Crowns

Getting a dental crown typically involves more of an investment in time and money than getting a filling. Even so, there are some good reasons why covering a tooth may be better than getting a smaller restoration.

Crowns Provide Better Support

Every time you fill a tooth, it gets a little weaker. Fillings replace some tooth structure after a cavity strikes, but they don’t really make the tooth stronger. Crowns, on the other hand, are designed to reinforce the whole tooth from the outside.

If your tooth has already been weakened by multiple fillings, then getting one more isn’t necessarily the best idea. Your dentist may recommend a dental crown to help keep your tooth in one piece.

The Decay or Damage May Be Too Large for a Filling

A typical filling can sufficiently repair small holes in a tooth. But a tooth can’t hold up if it’s more filling than tooth.

Crowns are the better option if your tooth is missing a large piece or has an extremely large cavity.

Crowns Seal Out Decay

Dental fillings are supposed to create a tight seal with the enamel, but they can have some weak spots around the edges. Crown margins, or edges, are usually located below or just at the gum line where they have another layer of protection against tooth decay. As long as you carefully brush and floss your crown, you can avoid developing new decay underneath.

Crowns Prevent Sensitivity

A crown provides significant insulation against temperature changes. Teeth worn down by acids or erosion may have lost a lot of enamel. Crowns can protect those teeth from the elements better than fillings can.

Learn more about the benefits of crowns by talking with your dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

May
20

Should You Change Out Your Metal Crown?

Posted in Crowns

Perhaps you got your metal cap years ago but now you regret having a silver tooth.

Should you upgrade your crown?

There are a few things to consider first.

What Happens When Changing a Crown

Removing a dental crown and putting on a new one isn’t like changing out shoes. Almost every time you get a crown, your tooth has to be freshly trimmed and shaped. This means that you lose a little more natural tooth structure each time you get fitted for a new restoration.

As you might guess, you tooth can only be whittled down so far and still be able to support a crown.

Be mindful that while changing out your crown for cosmetic reasons is still an option, you don’t want to do so too often or you could weaken your tooth.

How Old Is Your Crown?

If you’ve had your metal cap for ten years or more, then it has served you very well already. There is a chance that it could be hiding some decay underneath that you’re not aware of yet, and it might not even show up on x-rays.

Your dentist may recommend removing an old metal crown to see what’s going on underneath, and then recapping the tooth with a fresh white one.

But metal crowns tend to be the longest lasting of all dental cap types. If you’ve recently gotten one placed, there’s no need to change it out in a hurry and weaken your tooth further, unless your tooth is in pain.

You just never know for sure whether a dental cap is ready for replacement until you have it examined by a dentist. Call yours today to plan an appointment.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverwood Dental
3350 Riverwood Pkwy #2120
Atlanta GA 30339
(770) 955-2505

Mar
9

Why Did My Dental Crown Fail?

Posted in Crowns

Dental crowns don’t last forever, but you do reasonably expect to get several years out of your new dental restoration.

You’re understandably disappointed whenever a crown fails prematurely. What causes some dental caps to so?

Crown Fabrication Error

It’s not common for crowns to come off after a dentist carefully puts them in place. But if yours pops off soon after placement, you should see your dentist to find out if it was just an issue with the cementing process.

Sometimes, a dental crown can fail because it’s just a little bit too high. Even a subtle height discrepancy (we’re talking fractions of a millimeter) between your crown and your other teeth can cause serious problems. Eventually, your crown can loosen up because of premature wear and fall off or crack.

Recurrent Decay

You play an important role in making your dental crown last. If you can’t keep your crowned tooth clean, then it will fail, just like any other tooth. Your capped tooth is not immune to decay; cavity can still form at the edge and then spread underneath the margins, making it come off. That’s why flossing and brushing capped teeth is so important.

Cracked Dental Crown

Your tooth enamel can handle small cracks. Teeth are even designed to tightly close up small cracks. But dental crowns can’t do that. Once cracked, they’re compromised for good.

A crown can crack from trauma, chewing hard foods, or grinding against the opposing teeth. Once your crown cracks, it’s only a matter of time before bacteria slip inside and eat away the underlying tooth which loosens the restoration.

See a restorative dentist for a check-up if you’re worried about your dental crown.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Oct
30

Are There Any Alternatives to Getting a Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

While there’s no other solution that does exactly what a dental crown can, you may have a few alternatives to choose from. These will depend on both your smile goals and what your tooth needs.

Why Get A Crown?

A dental cap, or crown, is a single piece of material that a dentist seats over a tooth. The tooth must be trimmed to get rid of decay and weak areas and create a flat-topped cone shape that can securely support a cap. Crowns help teeth compromised by deep fractures or extensive decay to stay in one piece.

If You Don’t Get A Crown 

What are your other options?

Fillings. Some people prefer a filling because it’s cheaper, but it may only compromise your tooth further because of being too big.

Inlay or onlays. If only a portion of your tooth is damaged, then a filling-crown hybrid may be in order.

Veneers or bonding. These cosmetic treatments are conservative options only if your tooth is still structurally sound.

Extraction. You can pull the tooth and then deal with finding a way to replace it and preserve tooth alignment.

Do nothing. Whether your tooth hurts right now or not, it will break down sooner or later. Eventually, you won’t have the option of saving it with a crown – it’ll be either a root canal or extraction.

Rather than trying to figure out for yourself what your smile needs, visit a dentist near you. A professional will help you get an idea of the condition of your tooth. That way, you’ll be prepared to choose the best restorative option, which may very well end up being a dental crown!

Posted on behalf of:
Lakewood Dental Trails
10252 W Adams Ave
Temple, TX 76502
(254) 434-4035

Sep
27

What Are Dental Posts and Cores?

Posted in Crowns

Restorative dentistry has a large vocabulary. It’s easy to get confused about the differences between posts, cores, root canals, crowns, and so on.

How do posts and cores relate to crowns?

Get A Grip!

Crowns replace a tooth’s outer layer if it’s been damaged by decay or fracture. Caps take things a step further when a filling is insufficient.

But what happens when even a crown isn’t quite enough?

Dental crowns depend on a tooth having a solid core for support. Without a core, there’s not much for the cap to hold onto.

An artificial core is often made of a similar material as white dental fillings. Your dentist molds it into the tooth to create a new foundation for supporting the crown. This core is typically secured with small pins to help it hold onto the existing tooth.

Posts to Stabilize the Core

Your dentist will call on the help of a dental post if more than half of the natural crown (upper portion) of your tooth is missing, and the core needs more support to stay on the tooth.

At this point, your tooth should already have had a root canal. Posts cannot be placed in teeth without endodontic treatment. The dentist must drill down into the nerve chamber of the tooth to create a hole for placing the post. You don’t want this done on a live nerve!

After the root canal is completed, a dentist places a sturdy metal plug in the excavated area. Then, the core material is packed around it and a crown seals off the whole thing.

Talk with your dentist to learn which restorative techniques are right for saving your tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Aug
30

Do You Need a Crown If You Chipped a Front Tooth?

Posted in Crowns

Front teeth can fracture quite easily. Sometimes, it’s blunt trauma to the face from a car accident or a football. In other cases, the enamel was already weak and a piece snapped off when someone went to bite into a burger.

However it happened to you, you’re now concerned with making it look like a whole tooth again before someone gives you an unpleasant nickname.

Your dentist will give you a few treatment options and help you decide on the one that will save your tooth for as long as possible.

Treatment Options For Chipped Teeth

Dental bonding and veneers are just as common as crowns for repairing nicks in the enamel. In fact, your dentist may feel that your case merits the most conservative option possible.

A very minor procedure with bonding (which usually doesn’t even require anesthesia) won’t take away much more tooth structure. Veneers are a little more invasive, but they provide more complete protection.

When To Get A Crown

A lot of structural loss in the tooth usually merits getting a full dental crown. Not only can it completely patch up your tooth, but it will protect it from decay and bite pressure.

How Bad Is It?

Whichever treatment you get will simply be determined by the extent of the fracture. If it was deep and involved the nerve chamber, you may even need a root canal.

But the next time a chipped-tooth emergency arises in your life, don’t panic! Call your local dentist who will see you as soon as possible. You won’t leave the office without something on your tooth!

Posted on behalf of:
Heritage Dental
23945 Franz Rd Suite A
Katy, TX 77493
(832) 709-2429

Jul
17

Make Your Teeth Strong and Beautiful!

Posted in Crowns

Sick of seeing those brittle, chipped, or deeply stained teeth in the mirror? Dental crowns could be your secret to a more beautiful and stronger smile.

How A Crown Could Improve Your Smile

If you have a tooth with severe decay or a deep fracture, then a filling might not be enough to patch it up. That’s where a crown comes in.

A crown replaces the outermost layer of enamel and covers all visible surfaces of your tooth. Made of gorgeous, durable materials like porcelain and ceramic, today’s crowns look just like natural teeth.

Your crown doesn’t just protect your damaged tooth. It also reinforces the tooth so that you can keep using it for as long as possible. Additionally, crowns are a great way to close the gaps between teeth and cover up other hard-to-fix imperfections.

Is A Crown Right For You?

If your tooth has only shallow aesthetic flaws, then a dental veneer may be enough to give it a face-lift.

The only way to find out for sure whether you need a crown is to have your dentist examine your tooth. Using x-rays and other diagnostic techniques, he or she will evaluate the amount and integrity of the tooth structure you have.

A crown often ends up being the best long-term cosmetic solution.

Your days of suffering with weak teeth or an unsightly smile are almost over! If you’re ready for a change, then the first step is only one dental consultation away.

Call your local dentist to schedule a visit where you’ll find out which restorative option will help your tooth the most.

Posted on behalf of:
Sycamore Hills Dentistry
10082 Illinois Rd
Fort Wayne, IN 46804
(260) 213-4400

Apr
17

What Can You Eat with a Dental Crown?

Posted in Crowns

You want to protect your new dental crown and make sure it lasts you many years. But neither do you want to give up your favorite goodies. With a few precautions, you can continue eating with dental crown as you normally do.

Eating with a Temporary Cap

Temporary crowns are made of plastic and do not fit like permanent restorations. They just protect your tooth until the final crown is ready. You should avoid letting crunchy or chewy foods get near your temporary crown. It’s not the end of the world, but it is annoying if it does come off.

Foods to Avoid with a New Crown

Don’t eat or drink for about 30 minutes after getting your permanent crown. This helps the cement to set firmly. Stay away from hard or sticky foods for the first 24 hours.

Watch your sugar intake – your crowned tooth is still just as prone to getting cavities.

Be very cautious about using a crowned front tooth to bite into tough foods. Sandwiches are fine, but whole apples, corn-on-the-cob, and biting meat off BBQ ribs could put jeopardize your tooth. A crowned tooth will never be as strong as a natural one, so you do need to be careful.

What About Staining Foods?

Your new crown shouldn’t pick up too much stain. The issue though is that it can’t get any lighter in color. It’s made to match your other teeth at the time your dentist places it. If you ever want to bleach your teeth, you can’t expect the crown to lighten as well.

Still have some more questions about your new crown? Contact your dentist before the procedure to find out more.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

Nov
30

The Dental Crown Process

Posted in Crowns

If you’ve never had a crown until now, then you’re probably wondering what to expect. Dental crown placement is a very routine procedure. It’s a very safe process, and with attention to detail your dentist can make your treatment a success.

What Is a Dental Crown?

A dental crown replaces the outer layer of a tooth. The damaged portion of the tooth is removed and replaced with a strong solid piece of material such as porcelain or gold.

A crown restores the shape and strength of your tooth so that you can have a healthy bite. There’s nothing as good as retaining your natural tooth, so it’s worth the effort to save it!

Before Prepping the Tooth

Updated x-rays and a dental exam will help you determine what happened to tooth, how extensive the damage is, and whether the root or nerve chamber was damaged at all. The treatment plan considers how many teeth need crowns and what each tooth needs.

Receiving Your Crown

When it’s time to work on your tooth, the area round it will be thoroughly numbed. The decayed or fractured part of the tooth is carefully removed and the healthy enamel is reshaped. After that, your dentist will take an impression and/or scan of the prepared and neighboring teeth.

Next, you’ll get a temporary cap to protect your tooth while you wait for a lab to finish designing your permanent crown. A few weeks later, the dentist will take off the temporary crown and cement the permanent one in place. Bite tests and x-rays are taken to ensure that your treatment was successful.

Think you might need a crown? If you have a tooth that’s bothering you, contact your dentist to schedule an exam.

Posted on behalf of:
Gastonia Family Dentistry
2557 Pembroke Rd
Gastonia, NC 28054
(704) 854-8887

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