Dental Tips Blog

May
20

Life with Veneers: 4 Things You Should Know

Posted in Veneers

Dental veneers are perfect for covering up deep stain and rough enamel. They can close up gaps and even out the shape of neighboring teeth.

Before you decide to get dental veneers, just make sure you are aware of their limitations.

  1. You can’t bleach them.

Your veneers will be designed to reflect the whiteness level you want at the time they are placed. After that, there’s no changing them. If you bleach your teeth later on, they could end up whiter than the veneers.

  1. You may need to cut back on the coffee.

New porcelain veneers are tough and they aren’t porous like tooth enamel. While they aren’t as likely to stain, you can still get some unsightly darkening at the margins where they’re bonded. Try to limit dark-colored foods and drinks.

  1. They can chip off.

Veneers don’t have the strength of natural teeth or dental crowns. If you bite on them at an angle with enough force, they can pop off. Granted, it takes a lot to do that, but you should stay away from chewing ice or using your teeth as tools to open packages.

  1. Veneers cannot prevent tooth decay.

A dental veneer may cover the front of a tooth, but it can’t seal up the whole thing. Bacteria and acid can still eat away at the exposed parts and sneaky underneath the veneer. This means that although your veneer itself won’t decay, you still need to carefully brush and floss the tooth it rests on.

If you’re sure that you can take great care of your teeth and veneers after getting this cosmetic procedure, then ask your local dentist for a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Jul
12

How Do You Get Dental Veneers?

Posted in Veneers

To get dental veneers, the very first thing you need is a smile consultation with your dentist.

Your dentist will help you make sure that your teeth are good potential candidates. They should be mature and the jaw fully-developed. Overall, your smile will also have to be free of disease.

Once you’re cleared for treatment, the next step is designing how you want your smile to look. Not all veneers are the same. In fact, they are individually-designed for each tooth. Working with your dentist, you get to pick out the color and shape of the final restoration and basically figure out how you want your smile to ultimately look.

The Treatment Phase

At your first veneer appointment, the dentist trims away a bit of the enamel on the front of the teeth. Otherwise, classic porcelain veneers would feel too bulky. Next, he or she takes a mold of the prepared teeth and sends that along with designs off to a veneers lab.

You won’t go home with altered-looking teeth. Instead, the dentist fits you with temporary (often acrylic) veneers to protect your smile. In a matter of days or a couple weeks later, you’re called back in to get your permanent new veneers bonded in place.

Why Try Veneers?

As a dental veneer covers only the front of a tooth, it’s not meant to provide structural support. But it does benefit your tooth by giving it a smooth and flawless appearance.

You can repair just one tooth or several and hide stain, old fillings, small fractures, and gaps all with the help of veneers. Ask your dentist how.

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

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