Dental Tips Blog

Dec
31

6 Steps for Easy Denture Cleaning

Posted in Dentures

Are you getting your first denture? Do you have to clean the prosthesis of a dependent loved one? Just looking for some reminders to make sure you’re doing things correctly?

Follow these six steps to get a comfortable and fresh denture.

  1. Line the Sink

The best place to clean dentures is over a clean sink that’s filled with water and/or lined with a soft towel. This will prevent breakage if the denture slips and falls during the process.

  1. Soak the Denture

Soak the denture in a cleaning solution designed for dentures. This will loosen food, stains, and plaque.

  1. Brush Gently with Denture Brush

Dentures need brushing at least once a day. Don’t use any stiff-bristled brushes or steel wool that can scratch the surfaces. Avoid putting pressure on metal attachment parts, which could snap.

  1. Rinse Well!

Denture cleaning chemicals are strong, can leave a bad taste, and burn your gums. Rinse the denture thoroughly after cleaning it.

  1. Clean Your Mouth

Cleaning your mouth prevents bad breath and infections. It also helps the tissues inside feel fresh. Remaining teeth should be brushed with a toothbrush. How you clean a mouth with no teeth depends on the individual. Some use a soft toothbrush while others prefer a washcloth.

  1. Store Dentures in Water at Night

Make sure your dentures are properly stored for the night. It’s bad for the gums to leave them in while sleeping. Dentures should be submerged in a sealed container of water overnight. You may want to schedule your full cleaning routine every evening before bed.

Even if you don’t have any natural teeth left, your dentist still needs to check that your denture fits well and screen you for conditions such as oral cancer.

Call you or your loved one’s dentist today to schedule a visit.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Dec
28

How Long Will You Be Without Teeth When You Get Dentures?

Posted in Dentures

Are you worried about what you’ll do in the meantime with no teeth while you wait for your denture? How will you eat or talk to people?

Healing After Tooth Extraction

Your mouth needs time to heal after teeth have been pulled; and your gums may be quite swollen. A normal denture won’t comfortably fit over swollen gums. The shape of your mouth continues to change throughout the healing process, so it can be several months before your gums are ready for a permanent denture fit.

This doesn’t mean to have to go without teeth for months after extracting them, though.

What Are Your Options After Tooth Extraction?

You’ll be given a temporary denture to wear that’s designed to fit over swollen gums on the day of your extractions. This interim denture will control the swelling and keep you smiling while you wait until your mouth is ready for a permanent prosthesis.

If you’d prefer not to wear a temporary denture, then your dentist can outfit you with an immediate one. This will be the denture you wear from now on. It will be large enough to fit over swollen gums during healing, but it will have to be adjusted later on to fit your mouth as it changes shape.

If you’re in good health with an appropriate quality of bone tissue in your jaw, then you might qualify for implant dentures on the same day your teeth are extracted.

Whether you opt for same-day implants, a temporary denture, or an immediate one, rest assured that your dentist will have a solution so that you won’t go without teeth for long! Contact a denture provider near you to learn about your options.

Posted on behalf of:
Greencastle Dental
195 Greencastle Road
Tyrone, GA 30290
(770) 486-5585

Aug
4

4 Ways to Keep Your Dentures from Sliding Around

Posted in Dentures

Is your denture so loose that it slips around your mouth? Try these methods to give your “plage” a more secure fit.

Swallow When You Place Your Denture

For starters, make sure you’re placing your denture with the proper technique. After seating your denture on your gums, gently bite your teeth together to secure it, close your lips, and swallow. This creates a suction in the mouth that should help your prosthesis seal to against your gums. It can take a little practice to get this right, especially if you’re new to wearing dentures.

Use a Denture Adhesive

A denture cream or paste may give you improved comfort and a greater sense of security. Wash it off of your denture at the end of every day, though. If you don’t, the buildup of product could make your denture feel loose all over again.

Check Your Denture Fit

If a denture doesn’t fit no matter what you try, then the denture itself may need an adjustment. It might have to be altered to adjust to changes in your jawbone or gum tissue. Dropping your denture, washing it in hot water, using the wrong cleaning chemicals on it, or letting it dry out can also damage its fit.

Try an Implant Denture

When all else fails to fix your loose denture, it could be a sign that it’s just not right for you. Some people have a very difficult time wearing dentures successfully. You might do better with a dental prosthesis that’s supported by implants. Your prosthesis will rest securely on top of the implants instead of sliding around and pressing on your gums.

Contact a dentist near you to find out how to get a better denture fit.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Aug
1

What to Do if Your Dentures Make You Gag

Posted in Dentures

Dentures are supposed to help you enjoy your food. It’s ironic when they upset your stomach by triggering your gag reflex. Do dentures make you gag? Finding out why is the first step to getting some relief.

Why Your Dentures Make You Gag

The human mouth is very sensitive to objects that aren’t teeth, tongue, or food…and some people are more sensitive than others. Things like a toothbrush, sports mouth guard, or even a denture can cause some people to gag.

Gagging is very common in the weeks after you first get a denture. Gagging may even be accompanied by excess salivation. It simply takes time for your mouth to get used to having a foreign object in it. After a little while, you should feel comfortable wearing your denture.

What if the urge to gag doesn’t go away?

Prevent Gagging with Dentures

Try inserting your denture in different ways. Your dentist can show you how to put in a denture without setting off your gag reflex. You can also try repositioning your tongue inside your mouth to stabilize your denture so that it doesn’t shift around.

If nothing you try seems to work, then talk with your dentist about the possibility of adjusting your denture. It could be that your appliance is too loose or a little too long for your mouth. This is especially common with upper dentures where the plate reaches out too far onto the soft palate. A quick adjustment could get you a better fit with zero gagging.

Dentures aren’t supposed to make you gag! With a little practice and some help from your dentist, you can enjoy life with your new smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Jun
19

5 Reasons Why Your Lower Denture May Be Loose

Posted in Dentures

Is a loose lower denture ruining your ability to enjoy a meal or laugh around your friends?

A poor-fitting denture can be both painful and embarrassing. To make it fit properly again you need to first figure out what’s making it loose.

Here are a few possibilities you should consider.

  1. Your Denture Isn’t Properly Contoured

Dentures need to have little notches carved into the sides to accommodate tissue attachments. Your cheeks and lips are attached to your jaw by thin strong cables of skin called frenula. Your denture won’t rest securely on your jaw if it doesn’t have spaces to fit around those attachments.

  1. Your Denture Edges Are Too Thick or Thin

Dentures edges that are too thick, thin, short, or long will make your denture unstable.

  1. Your Impressions Weren’t Taken Correctly

Dentures are designed from a mold taken from your mouth. The dentist uses a soft impression material to capture the shape of your mouth. If the mold wasn’t taken with just the right amount of pressure, that could result in design flaws and a loose lower denture.

  1. Your Denture Teeth Are Uneven

Perhaps your denture fits just fine, but the upper and lower teeth don’t match up correctly. An uneven bite could knock your lower denture out of place.

  1. Your Denture Is Too Old

If your lower denture is suddenly loose after years of fitting perfectly, then that could mean you need a new one. The bone in your jaw shrinks under years of pressure from wearing such a prosthesis. Eventually, the denture doesn’t fit anymore and becomes loose.

Ask your dentist about solutions for a loose denture.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Jan
8

How Dentures Affect the Shape of Your Smile – for Better and for Worse

Posted in Dentures

Dentures are a common and affordable option for improving your smile’s function and appearance. But what kind of effect they have on your overall facial profile depends on their design and how well they fit.

How Dentures Improve Your Smile

Roots keep your teeth in place. They also stimulate bone health in the jaw. As long as you have teeth in place, the shape of your mouth will stay about the same.

When you lose teeth, your jaw loses valuable support. The bone resorbs and disappears, and your mouth can take on a sunken or caved-in look.

If this has happened to you, then a denture can help restore some of your smile’s original height.

Dentures Can Wear Down Your Jaw

Dentures rest directly on the gums for support. This means that they put pressure on the bone directly and can wear it down over time.

While a denture can keep your smile from looking caved-in, it doesn’t encourage new bone growth. After years of using a denture, your mouth will slowly wear down to the point that you need to be re-fitted.

If your denture doesn’t fit properly, then this bone wear can happen even faster and result in abnormal bone loss.

A bad bite with dentures can lead to problems like:

  • Gum sores
  • Sagging lips
  • Wrinkles around the mouth and neck
  • Saliva and food leaking out of the corners of the mouth
  • Sores and infections
  • Difficulty eating
  • Embarrassment

A well-fitted denture is the key to maintaining a youthful and natural-looking smile. Even better is one that’s supported by implants that act just like tooth roots. Talk with your dentist about denture options to save the shape of your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
(770)422-8776

Aug
22

What’s That Clicking Sound in Your Denture?

Posted in Dentures

Most of today’s dentures are primarily made from acrylic resin. This is basically a high grade plastic, but it can make noise when it impacts another prosthesis. It can be hard to ignore the sound if your dentures are clicking into each other at inopportune times!

What’s causing that to happen?

The Clicking Habit

Some denture wearers actually develop the unconscious habit of playing with their dentures with their tongue. This causes a clicking sound that perhaps the denture wearer isn’t aware of.

But if you notice and are annoyed by a clicking sound, then you probably aren’t flipping your denture around with your tongue!

Time for an Adjustment

Dentures usually crash together out of your control for one of two reasons:

  • They don’t have a snug fit on your gums
  • The dentures are vertically too short or too tall so that they close together earlier or later than your jaw naturally intends

In either case, the best solution is to have your denture checked by a dentist and see what tweaks can be made for a more secure fit.

How to Stop Your Dentures from Clicking

If you’re still getting used to wearing dentures, it may take some practice for you to speak with confidence. Take your time learning a new speech pattern. Talk a little slower and more deliberately than usual. You may find the clicking lessens this way.

You may have had your denture for a couple years and are just now noticing the clicking sound. A denture adhesive will buy you a measure of security until you can see a dentist for an adjustment.

At your next dental checkup, ask your dentist for more tips on stopping the click.

Posted on behalf of:
Muccioli Dental
6300 Hospital Pkwy # 275
Johns Creek, GA 30097
(678) 389-9955

Aug
21

How to Improve Your Speech with Dentures

Posted in Dentures

If you just got your first denture, then you may be worried that your speech never sound normal. But it can; getting used to new dentures just takes time.

While dentures are a major life adjustment, the good news is that you can successfully relearn how to speak with confidence!

The following tips will help.

Massage Your Gums

A tense jaw will only make the situation worse. Loosen tense muscles every morning by massaging your jaws and cheeks and chin. This boosts circulation and helps oral structures to relax. The more relaxed your mouth is, the easier it will be to speak while wearing a denture.

Speak Slowly

There’s no rush! When you take time to formulate your thoughts before speaking and then deliberately express them, you’re less likely to fumble over your denture.

Practice Makes Perfect

Practicing out loud when you’re alone is a great way to get more comfortable with tricky words. Practice words with lots of consonants like D, F, T, and V. If you’re worried about what to say to others, go ahead and rehearse at home in advance. Eventually, your tongue will relearn how to form words around your denture.

The Bite-and-Swallow Trick

One of the simplest things you can do is the bite-and-swallow trick. Bite your denture together and swallow. This helps your denture get a firm grip on your gums. Do this before you start to speak. It will ensure that you don’t trip over your denture as you begin to say something!

Your first denture may cause slurred speech and excess saliva for a little while. But with the help of your dentist, you’ll master talking with a denture in no time!

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

Aug
3

Are Second-Hand Dentures an Option?

Posted in Dentures

Jokes flew when one man posted a used denture for sale in a Facebook group for local buying, selling, and trading.

Surprisingly, there are plenty of second-hand dentures on eBay and in flea markets.

Who would ever buy used false teeth? The idea has appeal if it means saving a buck on your next denture. But there are three good reasons why a second-hand denture is not an option.

Denture Acrylic Hosts Germs

Dentures look like a solid piece of plastic, but they are actually porous. This means that the surface of the acrylic is covered with tiny holes that can host bacteria. It doesn’t matter how clean the appliance looks on the outside – putting in a used denture can put you at risk for picking up some unknown infection.

Used Dentures Are Not So Useful

If it’s second-hand, then the denture already has some mileage. Dentures wear down with time and can get fragile after being dropped once or twice. Buying a set of used false teeth means that you won’t get much life out them, anyway.

That Denture Was Not Designed for You

If you wear a denture custom-designed for someone else’s mouth, you’ll likely experience chafing and swelling in your gums. Uneven pressure can also cause your jaw bone to wear down faster than if you had a properly-fitting denture.

The best option is to have a custom denture made to fit the unique shape of your mouth. Ask your dentist about ways to afford a quality tooth replacement appliance.

As for your retired dentures, hold onto them – don’t sell them! They’re a safer option than borrowing someone else’s in the event you need a backup.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Aug
2

6 Things That Can Happen When You Wear a Poorly-Fitting Denture

Posted in Dentures

Has your denture gotten a little loose? A poorly-fitting denture can cause some major problems that you can’t afford to just ignore.

  1. Yeast Infection or Thrush

A denture that slips and slides provides the perfect openings for little microorganisms like fungus to flourish in. As a result, you can develop a yeast infection, also called thrush, under your denture.

If your denture is loose, you may salivate a lot. This extra saliva can pool up at the corners of your mouth and provide yet more moist hideouts for the fungus, resulting in sore cracks called cheilitis.

  1. Difficulty Chewing

Eating with a denture is tough as it is. If the denture doesn’t fit, then you can forget about chewing properly, either.

Difficulty eating can affect you in social situations and even impact the nutritional quality of your diet.

  1. Embarrassing Moments While Talking

It’s hard to ignore all those whistles and clicks while having a conversation with someone. A badly-fitted denture might make you more self-conscious and reserved about talking than you normally are.

  1. Sore Gums

A loose denture will chafe your delicate gum tissue and can cause sores that make it painful to wear your denture, at all.

  1. Bone Loss

The more your denture moves around, the more it puts awkward pressure on your jawbone. This leads to rapid bone-loss and changes the shape of your mouth and facial profile even more.

  1. Headaches or Jaw Aches

You may be doing tricks with your tongue and jaw to help stabilize a loose denture. This can put a strain on your TMJ and lead to headaches and pain while moving your jaw.

Visit a  denture specialist as soon as possible for an adjustment.


Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…