Dental Tips Blog

May
6

Is Your Denture Making Your Gums Red? What it Could Mean

Posted in Dentures

Denture-related stomatitis shows up as an angry red patch of tissue directly underneath a full or partial denture. It can also cause the corners of the mouth to get sore, red, and chapped-looking.

If you’ve noticed an odd red patch under your denture, then you could be suffering from a specific kind of stomatitis. “Stomatitis” means inflammation of the mouth.

The inflammation is typically caused by a fungus called candida. The resulting growth is actually a yeast infection and is also known as thrush. It’s the same kind newborn babies can get.

There’s no outrunning the infection since everyone has the candida fungus present in their mouths, all the time.

But what causes it to suddenly flourish and cause thrush?

Denture stomatitis is most common in denture wearers. An unclean denture or one that’s left in the mouth for long periods of time provides the perfect environment for candida to thrive. Smoking also contributes to the irritation.

How can you get rid of a candida infection? The steps are very simple and with a dentist’s advice, your thrush should clear up in a matter of weeks, or even less.

  1. Give your denture a thorough cleaning with a denture-safe cleaner and brush.
  2. Soak your denture and allow your mouth to “breathe” for periods of time, ideally overnight.
  3. Carefully clean plaque and food debris from your gums and any remaining teeth twice a day, at the least.
  4. Use an antifungal medication or lozenge as prescribed by your dentist.

There could be some other less common culprit behind the wound on your gums. Although yeast infections clear up easily, you should still see your dentist for an examination to rule out other causes.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-002

Jan
4

These Signs Could Mean That You Have Denture Stomatitis

Posted in Dentures

While this may be the first time you’re hearing about denture stomatitis, odds are good that you have heard of thrush before. A thrush infection can occur in anyone with a weakened immune system. But it is actually most common among denture wearers.

Thrush is an infection resulting from an excessive growth of a yeast called Candida albicans. This fungus is present in everyone’s mouths but it tends to take over when bacterial populations are out of balance or oral hygiene is poor…and often under dentures.

The warm moist space between your gums and a denture makes a prime place for this yeast to thrive in. So, if you wear one, here are some signs that you could have a classic case of thrush.

You…

  • Don’t remove your denture for daily cleaning
  • Don’t allow your mouth to “rest” or “breathe” each day
  • Notice redness under your denture
  • Have sore spots at the corners of your mouth
  • Have a denture that isn’t fitting right these days, and actually hurts a little

Use of an inhaler also ups your chances that denture discomfort is connected to thrush. It doesn’t take much for you dentist to diagnose denture-related stomatitis. A look at your gums and a few questions about your denture hygiene are usually all it takes, but a lab test can also confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment for thrush may involve a prescription medication. But the best thing to do starting out is simply to stop wearing your denture so much. Red and angry gums are saying that they’ve had enough! Your dentist will review with you some instructions for keeping your denture clean and comfortable.

Contact your dentist if it seems that your denture could be contributing to a case of thrush.

Posted on behalf of:
Basin Dentistry
5016 Briarwood Ave
Midland, TX 79707
(462) 699-7334

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….