Dental Tips Blog

Mar
13

Why Your Gum Health Matters

Posted in Gum Disease

Your gums might seem to be the least important part of your smile. You probably never even pay attention to them until you get a popcorn kernel stuck between your teeth and need to floss, and then your gums bleed a little.

Why should you be concerned about your gum health?

Here are four important reasons.

Gum Health Is Connected to Heart Health

Gum disease is an inflammatory condition. The bacteria and inflammatory response associated with gum disease are also linked to problems such as stroke and heart health. Keeping your gums healthy can lower your risk for cardiovascular problems.

Healthy Gums Equal Healthy Lungs

Studies show that people with gum disease tend to be at higher risk for pneumonia. Healthy gums can even improve conditions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Gum Health Affects Self-Image

You don’t always appreciate a good thing until it’s gone, they say, and that’s very true when it comes to your gums.

Receded gumlines can leave you with long yellow teeth that you may be ashamed to show off in a smile. Unhealthy gums can also lead to embarrassing tooth loss.

Healthy Gums Mean Good Nutrition

Having healthy gums is one sign that you’re getting plenty of vitamins in your diet. But healthy gums also do you a big favor by holding your teeth in place. As long as you have strong teeth to chew with, you can enjoy a varied and nutritious diet.

If you lose teeth to gum disease on the other hand, you may find it difficult to eat the fresh fruits and vegetables and chewy whole grains your body needs.

How are your gums doing? Find out by scheduling a checkup at your local dental office.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverwood Dental
3350 Riverwood Pkwy #2120
Atlanta GA 30339
(770) 955-2505

Mar
13

What’s Causing That Bad Taste in Your Mouth? 8 Possible Reasons

Posted in Gum Disease

There’s nothing like a bad taste in your mouth to ruin your appetite. But worse than that, an odd taste can indicate a serious oral health issue.

Is that bad taste due to one of the following causes?

Tooth Decay

A simple cavity can cause a strange taste in your mouth. Cavities are spots in your teeth where the enamel is actively dying, so the decaying tissue does have a foul taste.

Abscesses

When a cavity grows too large, it can infect the nerve of a tooth and create a sack of foul-tasting fluid on the gums. If it ruptures, your mouth will suddenly be filled with a salty taste.

Gum Disease

Chronically inflamed gums also give off a rancid taste as they break down. Strong breath odor coupled with a bad taste could signal periodontitis.

Plaque Buildup (Poor Oral Hygiene)

Don’t brush your tongue regularly? Bacterial plaque buildup can alter your taste sensation.

Tonsil Stones

Bacteria and food debris that collects in the pits on and near your tonsils can create a rotten-tasting, pebble-like formation.

Medications

Medications you take on a regular basis can cause a metallic taste in your mouth.

Acid Reflux

If you have stomach acid regularly washing back up into your throat, this can leave you with a particularly nasty taste in your mouth, especially first thing in the morning.

Thrush

You may have a treatable yeast condition called oral candidiasis if you notice white patches or sore red spots in your mouth along with an icky metallic taste.

Schedule a dental exam and talk with your local dentist to discover what’s causing bad breath issues for a fast solution to your halitosis woes.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Mar
9

Do You Have Gingivitis? 4 Signs to Look For

Posted in Gum Disease

Gingivitis is inflammation in the gum tissue. It happens when your gums react to an irritant, such as plaque bacteria. While this condition is easily reversible, it can progress to a more serious form of gum disease if you don’t stop it in time.

Do you have gingivitis right now that needs immediate attention?

Look for these four signs to find out.

  1. Swollen Gums

When gums get inflamed, they swell up from expanded blood vessels and increased fluids in the tissues. This is a part of a natural reaction that delivers pathogen-fighting agents to the infection site.

Your gums should create a tight seal against the surface of your teeth. But if your gum line looks rolled or puffy, then that could be a sign of swelling from gingivitis.

  1. Bleeding When You Brush or Floss

Bleeding while brushing or flossing is not normal. If your gums do bleed that easily, it means their skin is swollen so tightly that the underlying blood vessels easily break when bumped.

  1. Changes in Gum Color

Generally speaking, bright red gums are a sign of inflammation, so if your gums seem redder than usual, that could be a sign of gingivitis.

  1. Plaque or Tartar on Teeth Near the Gum Line

Gingivitis is most commonly caused by dental plaque. If you have a lot of soft pale plaque buildup along your gums, then that’s a sign you have gingivitis. Plaque left on teeth too long hardens into tartar or calculus that irritates gums.

Improving your oral hygiene routine can help you get rid of gingivitis. See a dentist to find out what other steps you should take.

Posted on behalf of:
Montevallo Family Dentistry
711 Wadsworth St
Montevallo, AL 35115
(205) 665-2224

Feb
3

Are You Paying Attention to Your Gums When You Brush?

Posted in Gum Disease

When you think about “brushing,” you automatically think “teeth.”

Brushing is very important for dental health. But did you know that it is equally as important for your gum health, too?

Here are some ways to show your gums a little more love while you brush each day.

45 Degrees at the Gum Line

Most importantly, make sure you’re brushing with the toothbrush bristles angled into your gum margin at about 45 degrees. This will ensure that you wick away all the plaque bacteria that accumulate there.

Germs are responsible for causing cavities, but other kinds of bacteria contribute to problems like gingivitis and periodontitis. Getting rid of this plaque film every day will lower your chances of gum disease.

Give Your Gums a Massage

While you brush along the gum line, wiggle the toothbrush in short and fast, yet gentle strokes. This jiggling motion is good for loosening plaque and it also stimulates healthy circulation in your gum tissue, which boosts your gums’ infection-fighting ability.

You can take things a step further by purchasing an electric toothbrush or a blunt-tipped gum stimulator. These make it easier to massage your gums to better health.

Rinse Out

An antibacterial rinse after brushing and flossing can slow down plaque growth for several hours. This has therapeutic benefits for your gums just as much as your breath.

Watch for Blood

Your gums should not bleed when you brush! If you see pink in the sink, that means you’re either brushing too harshly or there’s something more serious going on. You’ll need to see a dentist for advice.

Schedule regular oral health checkups at your local dental office to make sure your gums are in perfect shape.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverwood Dental
3350 Riverwood Pkwy #2120
Atlanta GA 30339
(770) 955-2505

 

Mar
31

What Your Gums Reveal About Your Risk for Alzheimer’s

Posted in Gum Disease

Brushing your teeth isn’t just good for your mouth. It could even have a beneficial effect on your long term memory, according to one study.

Researchers in Taiwan have recently made an interesting observation about gum disease and Alzheimer’s.

While we can’t say for sure that there is a direct link between the two conditions, there’s a definite pattern. Statistics show that older adults who have lived with gum disease for ten years or more were 70% more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

This figure already accounts for other factors known to contribute towards Alzheimer’s such as stroke, heart disease, and diabetes.

Does this mean that if you have gum disease you’ll develop Alzheimer’s?

Not necessarily. In fact, for all we know, a genetic inclination towards Alzheimer’s may be what predisposes someone to periodontitis.

But some experts suggest that having a chronic low-grade inflammation – like gum disease – raging in your body may play a role in the onset of other serious conditions.

Alzheimer’s disease is difficult to predict and prevent and impossible to reverse. But gum disease, on the other hand, is highly preventable. It usually responds well to straightforward treatment right in your local dental office.

As more research unfolds on the connection between gum disease and other illnesses, now is the best time to get your gum health under control.

Get started by:

  • Eating a balanced diet with plenty of protein and vitamin C
  • Brushing and flossing daily
  • Visiting a dentist for a gum health assessment

As your local dentist to evaluate the condition of your gums. Keeping them healthy is a great way to lower your risk for many other potential problems.

Posted on behalf of:
Manhattan Dental Design
315 W 57th St Suite 206
New York, NY 10019
(646) 504-4377

Jan
10

Could There Be a Connection Between Arthritis and Your Gums?

Posted in Gum Disease

The potential connection between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis has been a topic of interest all around the world.

While we’ve known for some time that there must be some kind of link between the two conditions, we still don’t know exactly what it is. We do know that both are inflammatory diseases. It definitely seems that having one of the two issues puts you at risk for the other.

Does Rheumatoid Arthritis Cause Gum Disease . . . ?

Some studies suggest that people with rheumatoid arthritis are up to five times more like to develop serious gum disease than those who don’t have arthritis.

A study in Germany also found that when cases of gum disease showed up among rheumatoid arthritis sufferers, it was more severe and aggressive than usual.

Could the two conditions share an even deeper relationship?

Genetics could have something to do with it. According to one study in Israel, a genetic marker (HLA-DR4) linked to rheumatoid arthritis was also found in 80% of study subjects with gum disease.

. . . Or Does Gum Disease Cause Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Another possible theory points to the fact that gum disease can make people up to four times more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis. It’s widely suggested that bacteria from the gum infection travel via the bloodstream and trigger inflammation in other areas of the body. This would directly contribute to a systemic condition like rheumatoid arthritis.

Are You At Risk?

Your local dentist can help you find out what your gum disease risk is. You can lower your chances by practicing excellent oral hygiene.

Posted on behalf of:
Bear Valley Dental Care
137 Montgomery Ave, Suite 200
Boyertown, PA 19512
610-473-0717

Dec
26

What Happened on “Gum Health Day?”

Posted in Gum Disease

Friday May 12, 2017 marked the “European Gum Health Day,” supported by 27 of the national societies making up the European Federation of Periodontology (EFP). The event drew in extensive media coverage and here in it’s fourth year shows promising signs of further growth.

So, why was this a big deal?

The EFP unites national gum health societies from all over Europe, Caucasia, North Africa, and the Middle East. Their aim? Support research and education activities that promote periodontal (gum) health.

The annual event on May 12 marks an occasion of public outreach via university courses, conferences, media broadcasts, and free periodontal screenings. It’s estimated that millions of people were reached with an important message about gum health.

Why Gum Health Awareness Matters

It might seem like a silly thing to be so concerned about something as unimportant as gums. But is it, though?

You gums play an essential role in keeping your teeth anchored to your jaw. Additionally, their health is intricately connected to other body systems. Gum disease has been linked to some very serious conditions ranging from erectile dysfunction to stroke.

Alerting the general public to the importance of taking responsibility for their gum health is one way dental professionals build a stronger and healthier community. Awareness programs help people to identify:

  • Whether they are at risk for gum disease
  • Possible signs and symptoms of disease
  • Methods for preventing oral disease
  • Adequate treatment options for controlling gum disease

Here in the United States, there’s an entire month dedicated to national gum disease awareness. Don’t wait until next February, Gum Disease Awareness Month, to schedule a gum health checkup for every family member!

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. C Family Dentistry
13514 E 32nd Ave
Spokane Valley, WA 99216
(509) 591-9317

Oct
8

How Do I Know If I Have Gum Disease?

Posted in Gum Disease

Also known as gum disease, periodontitis is one of those conditions that can be considered a “silent killer” for your smile.

Gum disease is not likely to be deadly in the way that heart disease or cancer can be. But it is connected to serious ailments such as pneumonia and stroke. That’s because the gums are a gateway to the rest of your body. A chronic infection in your mouth can negatively impact other areas.

How do you know if you’re susceptible to this underestimated yet common disease?

Your Gums Easily Bleed

Contrary to popular belief, your gums don’t bleed because your hygienist “stabs” them. Neither is it normal for gums to bleed when you floss. Inflamed gum tissue is loaded with blood vessels that are easily damaged. So, if you notice pink in the sink, that could be a sign of infection.

Your Bad Breath Just Won’t Go Away

Not all kinds of halitosis can be masked with a breath mint. Chronic gum disease can leave a frustrating odor on your breath that causes people to keep their distance.

Gum Recession Is Driving Your Crazy

Do your teeth look a little long? Gums will shrink away from teeth as a result of inflammation from periodontitis. If you notice that more of your tooth roots are exposed, then it’s worth seeing a dentist to find out whether gum disease is to blame.

Don’t wait much longer if any of these signs are plaguing your smile! Taking quick action to treat or prevent gum disease could save not just your teeth but possibly lower your risk for other serious health problems.

Posted on behalf of:
Moores Chapel Dentistry
9115 Samlen Lane #105
Charlotte, NC 28214
(704) 389-9299

Sep
19

Nearly 1 Out of 2 People Have This Disease – Are You At Risk?

Posted in Gum Disease

According to a CDC study, some 47% of Americans have this disease…

…It’s bacterial in origin.

…It’s contagious.

…It’s connected to other diseases like stroke, Alzheimer’s, and diabetes.

…Untreated, it will lead to tooth loss.

Can you guess what it is?

Also called periodontal disease or periodontitis, we’re talking about none other than simple gum disease.

The Ever-Present Threat Of Gum Disease

You might have been surprised to learn that periodontitis is so prevalent. Gum disease occurs in varying stages and affects people differently depending on their oral hygiene, health, and even genetics. Still, it may be closer to home than you may realize.

Gum disease starts out as gingivitis – uncomplicated gum inflammation. But inflamed gums pull away from teeth and create pockets which shelter greater numbers of harmful bacteria. The more bacteria show up, the more your body has to fight against.

Gingivitis left untreated will advance to a more complex infection. Your gums and the ligament and bone underneath can break down. This is how teeth lose support and eventually fall out.

The bacteria that trigger gum inflammation are so common that everyone picks them up over the course of their lifetime. Given the opportunity to flourish, those germs will do so.

How Can You Prevent Gum Disease?

While there’s no practical way to eliminate the germs from your mouth altogether, you can still keep them from accumulating.

How?

Efficient, daily tooth brushing and flossing.

A solid daily regimen of oral hygiene, coupled with routine cleanings, good nutrition, and healthy lifestyle choices is the most important way to keep gum disease at bay.

Consult your dentist for a gum health evaluation to find out your risk.

Posted on behalf of:
Hudson Oaks Family Dentistry
200 S Oakridge Dr #106
Hudson Oaks, TX 76087
(817) 857-6790

Aug
30

No Bugs In Your Hair or Bed . . . But Have You Checked Your Gums?

Posted in Gum Disease

Okay, so this isn’t one of those urban myths about finding cockroaches in fast food. But sometimes, truth really is stranger than fiction.

Our society is paranoid of buggy infestations. We check our kids’ head for lice, we check hotel rooms for signs of pests before we sleep there, and we wash our hands like crazy during flu season.

Your gums are also prone to infection by tiny enemies. But because you don’t feel or see them, it’s easy to underestimate the damage they’re capable of.

What “Bugs” In The Gums?

“Bugs” is an oversimplification for bacteria. Their action is just as creepy, though!

Human mouths contain hundreds of species of bacteria. Some are perfectly harmless. But some individuals have high levels of dangerous germs. These bacteria trigger serious gum inflammation.

If those germs aren’t removed, your swelling gums will provide more hideouts for the bacteria to multiply in and will eventually result in gum disease.

As this process continues, your gums will start to pull away from your teeth forming “pockets.” These pockets, naturally, harbor more harmful bacteria in addition to plaque and tartar.

Periodontal disease (gum disease) a vicious cycle. In an effort to fight the infection, your gums will produce high levels of chemicals. Unfortunately, these substances only cause further breakdown of your gums. These chemicals and bacterial toxins can reach the bone, and next thing you know, your teeth are losing support fast.

Fight Gum Inflammation

Happily, you’ve got this! Your best defense starts simply with daily brushing and flossing to keep those germs from building up. A professional gum health assessment will give you an idea of what you’re up against so call your dentist to schedule.

Posted on behalf of:
Timber Springs Dental
5444 Atascocita Road Suite 100
Humble, TX 77346
(713) 244-8929

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