Dental Tips Blog

Aug
3

How to Get Rid of Swollen Puffy Gums

Posted in Gum Disease

Puffy gums usually happen as a reaction to an irritant like bacteria or dental calculus. Your gums may be particularly prone to swelling due to:

  • Wearing braces
  • Taking certain medications
  • Pregnancy or other major hormonal changes
  • A compromised immune system

What can you do if your gums often look puffy?

Improve Your Oral Hygiene

Reassess how well you clean your teeth. The less debris there is in your mouth, the less likely your gums are to swell up.

An effective routine focuses on gently brushing along the gum line at least twice a day. You should also floss once a day to keep plaque bacteria from irritating the gums between teeth.

Whether your swollen gums are directly related to oral hygiene or not, it never hurts to improve in your brushing. But if your gums are very uncomfortable, you may need some more immediate relief.

Ice Your Gums

Cool your gums and bring down the inflammation with ice water or a popsicle. The cold will constrict blood vessels and soothe puffy tissue.

Take a Painkiller

You should only medicate against gum pain if your doctor says it’s okay. But most over-the-counter painkillers can help dull strong pain caused by swollen gums.

Topical Numbing Gel

A numbing spray or gel used to treat oral sores can also work on sore gums. If your swollen gums have become so tender that it hurts to brush or eat, then numbing them up beforehand may be helpful.

Some kinds of gum inflammation are a sign of serious infection that could put your health at risk. Talk with your dentist to get an idea of what’s causing your gum tissue to puff up and to discover an effective solution, especially if symptoms don’t clear up in a day or two.

Posted on behalf of:
Manhattan Dental Design
315 W 57
th St Suite 206
New York, NY 10019
(646) 504-4377

Sep
22

It’s Just Gingivitis – What’s the Big Deal?

Posted in Gum Disease

Discolored teeth and gingivitis can’t do that much harm, right?

“Dirty” teeth aren’t just stained. They also host lots of bacterial species, both good and bad. Leave those bacteria on your teeth long enough, however, and some will start to cause trouble.

Some germs, for example, cause cavities. Others, when left in contact with the gums for more than a day, will trigger a case of gingivitis.

What Is Gingivitis?

Your gums react to bacteria the way your skin reacts to a splinter.

Irritants trigger an automatic immune response. Gum tissues swell to allow more pathogen-fighting agents to get to the site of infection. As a result, your gums will start to look puffy and redder than usual.

This is gingivitis – the first stage in the process of gum inflammation.

Why Gingivitis Means Trouble

If those germs that caused the inflammation don’t go away, neither will the swelling.

More plaque bacteria can sneak into the tight space between tooth and gum as the gums swell and pull back from the teeth. Over time, this space can widen and allow more debris to slip in and aggravate the infection.

Your body will step up its disease-fighting game, but this process also damages gum tissues and bone. You could be left with a vicious cycle in which the bacteria multiply and your gums continue to break down. The end result is a destructive condition called periodontitis.

Periodontitis causes bad breath and gum recession and can lead to tooth-loss and other health issues.

So don’t brush off a mild case of gingivitis as nothing. Ask your dentist for periodontal treatment options to reverse the inflammation while you still can!

Posted on behalf of:
Meridian Campus Family Dental
3201 Willamette DR NE
Lacey, WA 98516
(360) 200-5505

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