Dental Tips Blog

Feb
3

Who Should Place Your Dental Implant?

Posted in Dental Implants

With so many dental offices advertising dental implants at bargain rates, it’s easy to think that any dentist is qualified to place them. But it’s not nearly that simple.

The Difference Between a Dentist and a Specialist

Oral surgeons and periodontists are recognized by the ADA (American Dental Association) as specialists. General dentists are legally-qualified to place implants, but they usually haven’t had the extra training specialists receive, which includes three or four years beyond dental school.

You don’t have to visit a specialist to get your implants. However, you deserve to have experienced care.

How Much Training Is Enough?

Many general dentists want to offer dental implants. Thus, they take a course to learn about placing them. These trainings are often only up to three days long.

That’s enough time to learn how to place an implant successfully, but it’s not enough to gain much experience. Specialists spend years handling tricky cases so that they figure out how to anticipate outcomes associated with implant surgery.

You may find a dentist willing to place implants at a ridiculously cheap rate. While you may save money initially, keep in mind that this is a way many new implant providers gain experience. If something goes wrong, you’ll have to pay out more to get expert help in fixing things.

There are plenty of great dentists out there with lots of implant experience.

Make sure you do your research. Ask questions such as:

  • How long have you been placing implants?
  • How many implant placement courses have you taken?
  • Do you refer out complex cases?

Ask your dentist for more information on finding a skilled implant provider in your area.

Posted on behalf of:
ConfiDenT
11550 Webb Bridge Way, Suite 1
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 772-0994

Feb
3

Would Anyone Be Able to Tell if You Had a Partial Denture?

Posted in Dental Bridges

You need to have a tooth removed and you’ve opted to get a partial denture in its place.

You’ve never had a false tooth before, so you’re a bit nervous. Would anyone notice that your new tooth isn’t real?

No One Will Notice Your Partial . . . While You’re Wearing It

Dentures and partial dentures are made to look as natural as possible. While you’re wearing your prosthesis, it will look just like any of your other natural teeth. A well-fitted one won’t fall out. Rather, it will give you a more secure bite, so no one will ever notice, even when you eat.

Removing and Cleaning Your Partial

You have to remove your partial at night to clean it properly. Soak it in water and never sleep with it in, since your mouth dries out at night. The dry environment fosters germ growth that can cause painful gum infections. If you end up with inflamed gingiva, you may not even be able to wear your partial during the day.

But what if you find yourself in a situation where you’re embarrassed to remove your partial denture for cleaning when others are around?

The best thing is to have a proper storage container handy right near your bedside. Most likely, others won’t notice if you take out your appliance right before you sleep and turn out the light.

Consider a Dental Implant Instead of a Partial

It could be very difficult to keep your partial denture a secret from everyone forever.

For the most secure and natural-looking tooth replacement, you might want to consider a dental implant. Talk with your dentist to find out which option is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Sep
9

What it Means if Your Dental Implant Is Loose

Realizing your dental implant is loose can be a scary sensation. You don’t want to lose another tooth!

Before you panic and assume that your implant will just fall out, consider a few possible reasons your implant feels unstable.

Loose Crown

Take a good look in the mirror and see whether the wiggliness is truly coming from the implant or perhaps the implant crown. A damaged crown won’t sit securely on an implant. It’s possible that just restoring your implant with a new crown will help stabilize what’s going on.

Loose Abutment

The connector that holds your crown onto the implant could have a problem. Sometimes, it just needs to be anchored in a little tighter with a special tool.

Excessive Force

Genuinely loose dental implants could be the result of bad occlusion (bite.) A teeth-grinding habit, trauma, or poorly-aligned bite could put excessive pressure on an implant. Implant posts don’t respond to pressure the way natural teeth do.

Implant Rejection

If your implant is loose within a year of placing it, that could point to an issue with your jaw bone not accepting the foreign body. Integration failure usually happens within the first year of getting an implant placed.

Peri-implantitis

When the ligaments around a tooth root become infected and inflamed, this is called periodontitis. Implants don’t have the support of ligaments, so when they get infected, the surrounding bone breaks down in a condition called peri-implantitis. This happens when an implant is not kept clean and free of bacteria.

If you suspect an issue with your dental implant, don’t hesitate to schedule a visit with your dentist or implant surgeon to find out what’s wrong.

Posted on behalf of:
Green Dental of Alexandria
1725 Duke St
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 549-1725

Sep
4

Can a Dental Implant Fall Out?

Posted in Dental Implants

Getting a dental implant can be costly and time-consuming. It’d be terrible to see all that time and money go to waste.

So you may naturally worry: “is it possible for an implant to fall out?” Fortunately, dental implants rarely do. They have a 97% success rate. This means that once in place, they’re virtually guaranteed to stay.

A dental implant is a screw that binds with bone in the jaw and creates a seal with the gums. It takes a lot for that to come loose.

However, there are a few instances that could cause an implant to fail…

Inadequate Healing

The initial months after getting an implant are critical. Adequate blood circulation, sufficient bone, and lots of rest are necessary to help an implant “take” to the surrounding bone.

Your implant surgeon will do everything possible to ensure the implant site is ready before placing the restoration. But what you do after the procedure also makes a difference. For instance, smoking can interfere with the healing process and cause a weak bond with the implant, increasing the chances of it falling out.

Poor Oral Hygiene

A dental implant requires regular care and attention its entire life. If you ever neglect your implant when it comes to brushing and flossing, the surrounding gums and bone could become infected and inflamed (just like natural teeth) and the implant can fall out.

Trauma

As with any natural tooth, an implant can be knocked right out of the bone in an accident.

It may take a little bit of work to get a dental implant, but it’s worth it to have a new tooth! Ask your dentist for more information on how to make your implant treatment a success.

Posted on behalf of:
Bayshore Dental Center
810 W Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd #2900
Seffner, FL 33584
(813) 330-2006

Jul
15

Why Are Dental Implants So Expensive?

Posted in Dental Implants

A dental implant might sound like a simple tooth replacement. What’s the big deal with placing an artificial tooth into the socket? Why does it have to cost so much?

Some dentists like to explain using the example of completing a home improvement project.

Unlike a new car or phone where you just head off to a store to pick it up, making a change to your home takes many other factors into consideration:

  • The skill of the craftsman you hire for the project
  • The quality of the materials you select
  • How long it takes to complete your project
  • The condition of your land or building before the project

Likewise, getting a dental implant is about far more than just putting a fake tooth in place of the lost one. It takes a good deal of careful planning, which requires a lot of time and the use of costly equipment.

You’d probably agree that especially where your health is concerned, you want to get the job done right the first time. A dentist or oral surgeon who really knows their craft and takes their time to perfectly place dental implants is worth every dollar spent.

A cheap dental implant deal, on the other hand, doesn’t speak well of the quality or experience behind it.

Not to be forgotten are the overhead costs. Your implant fee isn’t going straight to the dentist’s pocket. Dental materials are pricey, dental equipment is expensive, and then there are lab fees, clinic maintenance bills, and employees to be paid.

That’s all taken into consideration when you get billed for an implant.

Ask your dentist how you can get an affordable and high-quality dental implant.

Posted on behalf of:
Gainesville Dental Group
1026 Thompson Bridge Rd
Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 297-0401

Jul
15

Do I Have to Take My Partial Denture Out at Night When I Sleep?

Posted in Dentures

After getting a partial denture, you’ll be instructed to not wear it overnight. You might be in the habit of forgetting and falling asleep with your partial in, but it’s an important rule to comply with.

Perhaps you’re in a social situation where you’d feel awkward being seen without your false tooth in, even late at night.

Why is it so important to not wear your partial denture at night?

Your Mouth at Night

If you have a habit of grinding your teeth while you sleep, this could damage your partial. Then you wouldn’t have anything to replace your tooth with when you wake up.

Hygiene concerns also factor in. Your mouth tends to dry out at night while you sleep. Leaving a partial denture in only leaves more space for harmful bacteria to collect. There isn’t that steady saliva flow you have during the day which normally rinses away bacteria.

Lastly, your gums will appreciate having a break from the metal and acrylic frame pressing on them! Give your mouth a chance to “breathe” while you sleep, to avoid infection or bone loss from the pressure.

What to Do with Your Partial at Night

Your partial denture should be cleaned once a day. Right before bed is a great time. Use a denture brush and a mild hand soap or denture cleaner to give them a gentle scrubbing. This removes plaque and debris.

Also brush and floss your remaining natural teeth.

Rinse thoroughly and then store your partial in a container of fresh water or a denture solution overnight. In the morning, pop your partial back in after thoroughly brushing it.

For more tips on keeping your partial denture comfortable for years to come, visit your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Elegant Smiles
1955 Cliff Valley Way NE #100
Brookhaven, GA 30329
404-634-4224

May
13

Is it Harmful to Chew without Teeth?

Posted in Dentures

No matter how skilled you might be at eating with no teeth, there are some serious consequences that can result.

Gum Infections

Your soft gums aren’t designed to chew food. They only cushion teeth and bone. If you chew directly on your gums, they can get cut, irritated, and develop uncomfortable infections.

Jaw Bone Shrinkage

Just like your gums, the bone in your jaw wasn’t meant to take the direct force of chewing. The pressure of chewing without teeth can cause your jaw to wear down and shrink, giving your smile a collapsed look. This shape makes it even harder to fit your jaw for dentures or implants later on.

Poor Digestion and Nutrition

Without teeth, food doesn’t spend a lot of time in the mouth. You may not produce enough saliva to help everything go down smoothly.

Teeth are necessary for breaking food down into manageable portions. If you can’t chew your food thoroughly, the large bits won’t break up as well. This can lead to indigestion, excess bacterial growth, and gas.

As you reach for soft foods that are easy to chew and swallow without teeth, you might pass up some key nutrients your body needs. A well-rounded diet that includes crunchy grains and vegetables is good for your health, but hard to manage when you have no teeth. As a result, you can suffer nutritional deficiencies.

Going tooth-free sounds like a good way to save money, but you may end up spending more on the resulting complications. Chewing with a denture is better than nothing.

Are you ready to start talking about possible tooth replacement options? Contact a dentist in your area for a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

May
13

Dental Bridge or Implant – Which Should You Get?

Posted in Dental Implants

If you’re missing a tooth, a bridge or implant could give you back a functional and beautiful smile. You may be confused, however, about which one to get.

What Are Dental Bridges? 

A bridge is a restoration that spans a gap between teeth. The bridge caps the neighboring teeth with dental crowns and suspends a false tooth over the empty space. Bridges are most often made from porcelain for a natural look and feel.

How Dental Implants Work 

Dental implants are tiny metal screws the dentist places into the jaw bone. These artificial tooth roots support a dental crown as the tooth replacement. Implants don’t require capping the neighbor teeth since they function independently.

Differences Between Bridges and Implants

Dental bridges can be completed in just a couple of appointments. Getting a bridge is not an surgical procedure, so it’s usually safe for everyone. Once you get a bridge, it will stay with you for several years until it needs to be replaced.

Implants require more work and planning than bridges. Because getting an implant is a minor surgical procedure, your oral and general health have to be in good shape before you can qualify for the treatment.

The advantages implants have over bridges is that they are permanent and don’t require reshaping any healthy neighboring teeth.

If, however, you have other teeth around the empty gap that are in need of crowns or fillings, then you may be better off getting a bridge. In this case, a bridge can serve the dual purpose of filling in a gap and restoring other decayed teeth.

Contact a general dentist to find out which restoration is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Feb
13

Do You Have Kidney Disease? You May Still Qualify for a Dental Implant

Posted in Dental Implants

An estimated 11% of adults worldwide are affected by chronic kidney disease, the vast majority of which have oral symptoms that can contribute to tooth loss.

These issues often result from a combination of poor oral hygiene and the effects of medications. Kidney disease can also result from diabetes, another condition that endangers oral health.

What’s more, the negative conditions worsen each other. Kidney disease may affect oral health and poor oral health will prevent you from eating foods that your kidneys need.

Oftentimes, patients with chronic kidney disease are those most in need of reliable tooth replacements. But health risks may have both the dentist and you, the patient, wary. Getting an implant is usually straightforward, but with so many complications in the mix, what can you do?

Implant specialists from around the world have been studying this issue and recently published several recommendations in the International Journal of Oral Science (IJOS):

  • Dentist should consult with kidney specialist to plan implant treatment
  • Multiple blood tests and blood counts are necessary
  • Aim to have surgery one day after hemodialysis
  • Take specialized x-rays of proposed implant site to ensure bone is strong
  • Treat gums for disease before implant procedure to reduce risk of infection
  • Longer than usual healing time
  • Follow up with frequent maintenance visits with dentist

In summary, if you have chronic kidney disease and are interested in getting dental implants, be prepared to take it slow. Careful planning and thorough communication are key.

Talk with your doctor and dentist about the possibility. If the anticipated benefits to your health far outweigh any small risks, getting an implant may well be worth the effort.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Dec
31

Dentures Are No Substitute for Natural Teeth, Dentists Warn

Posted in Dental Implants

Many people believe that dentures are an inevitability. But changes in dentistry are leading to people keeping their natural teeth longer. Working to keep your own teeth healthy will make you more likely to have them for the rest of your life.

Sure, you can take your teeth for granted and assume a denture is the dental procedure to end all dental procedures.

Before you do, take a minute to consider how a denture could actually bring about other concerns that you hadn’t considered.

This Doesn’t Taste As Good As I Remembered . . .

An upper denture in particular is good at blocking your ability to taste foods. Things will seem a lot less flavorful after you get dentures. Bummer.

Bite Down. Now Lighten Up By 90%.

If you get dentures, you can expect your bite force to be about a tenth of what it is right now. That makes a big difference in what you’ll be able to chew with ease. You’d have to cut everything up into tiny bites or restrict your diet to nutrient-poor or soft foods.

Your Smile Changes Over Time

With years of wear, the pressure of a denture on the gums causes the bone underneath to resorb. Gradually, your mouth takes on a sunken-in look. This can age your appearance and make it harder to get your denture to fit.

Really Less Work?

You might think daily brushing and flossing for natural teeth is a pill. You’re not off the hook when it comes to denture care. They require daily brushing and soaking plus frequent maintenance appointments.

The bottom line? Show love to the teeth you’ve got. Don’t rush to get them pulled. If you need to replace missing teeth, there may be better options such as dental implants or an implant supported dental bridge.  Talk to your dentist about what tooth replacement options are best for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Greencastle Dental
195 Greencastle Road
Tyrone, GA 30290
(770) 486-5585

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