Dental Tips Blog

Apr
14

How to Recover Quickly from Oral Surgery

Posted in Oral Surgery

Whether you’ve had some wisdom teeth extracted, your jaw reconstructed, or gum grafting done, it’s time to rest and baby yourself a bit.

Rest Up

Too much physical activity can raise your heartrate and disrupt the blood-clotting process. Your body needs to relax and spend its energy on healing up a wound. Take a few days off from work and stay in bed (or on the couch.) Avoid doing any tasks that require you to bend over. Now would be a good time to binge on your favorite TV series.

Ice It

Placing an ice pack against the sore area on the outside of your face can help reduce swelling, pain, and bruising within the first 24 hours.

Brush Gently (or Not at All)

Oral hygiene shouldn’t take a vacation, but things are different when you have a surgical wound in your mouth. You don’t want to disrupt any stitches, dressings, or blood clots. Follow your surgeon’s instructions carefully when it comes to routine for the first few days following your procedure.

Take Painkillers as Directed

Over-the-counter pain meds can be just as effective as the stronger drugs only a doctor can prescribe. Easing the discomfort after oral surgery will help you get that vital rest your body needs. But be careful to only take what your surgeon recommends; have a friend or family member measure out the medication for you while you’re still woozy from anesthesia.

Eat a Soft Diet

Stick to cool liquid or soft foods for a while. Soup is okay as long as it’s mostly broth with no chewy ingredients (and it’s not too hot.) Yogurt, oatmeal, scrambled eggs, ice cream, and fruit and veggie juices are good, too.

Ready to bounce back after your next oral surgery? Ask your surgeon for more tips.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

Aug
13

Managing Discomfort After Oral Surgery

Posted in Oral Surgery

Oral surgeries encompass a wide range of procedures. From wisdom simple extractions to gingival grafts, oral surgery procedures are designed to enhance your oral health and improve a person’s smile. Managing discomfort after an oral surgery is important, especially if you plan to return to work or school in a short period of time. Although some types of surgeries can take as long as 2 weeks for complete healing to take place, discomfort should not last for more than a few days.

Keeping your mouth clean

Rinsing with warm salt water throughout the day plays two important roles. One is that salt water helps remove inflammation in the soft tissues throughout the mouth. Two, the water helps remove food debris or bacteria from the areas around the surgical site. This is more comfortable and gentler than brushing or using an alcohol-containing mouth rinse when your tissues are still recovering. 

Using warm or cold compresses

Alternating a warm and cold compress against the side of the face for 5 minutes at a time will minimize swelling, inflammation, and minor discomfort. Most discomfort is caused by inflammation, so preventing inflammation from occurring in the first place is a great way to avoid unnecessary discomfort. Only hold the compress against the skin for a few minutes at a time, alternating the cold and hot each time. 

Taking the right medication

Always take any prescription medication as directed. Don’t take just any medication! Your dentist may prescribe an antibiotic (for infection) or pain medication. Or, you may be advised to take ibuprofen as needed after a certain point. Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory medication as well as pain reliever.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Mac Worley, Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

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Nov
6

Foods to Eat When Recovering From Oral Surgery

Posted in Oral Surgery

After an oral surgery procedure like an extraction, wisdom tooth removal, or gum grafting, you’ll need to take it pretty easy for a few days when it comes to what you eat. Here are some great ideas for helping curb your hunger while also being gentle on your healing oral tissues:

Pudding or Yogurt

A classic “go to” food after dental surgeries, yogurt and pudding are easy to eat because they don’t require any chewing, and they’re smooth when you swallow them. The cool temperature can also help sore areas in your mouth feel better if they are still inflamed.

Soups

As long as they aren’t too hot, warm or room temperature soups like potato or chicken broth can be satisfying and be easy to eat as long as you’re not still numb.

Eggs

Soft and full of protein, eggs can help you feel fuller when you’re not up to eating much solid food. Scrambled eggs are quick and easy to make, and will help you feel satisfied more than a soup would.

Oatmeal or Grits

As you introduce a little more texture into your diet, warm cereals can help you test the waters when it comes to deciding if you can handle solid foods yet or not.

Canned Peaches

Softer than fresh fruits, canned peaches can be eaten even if you’re not comfortable with a lot of chewing. They’ll also help you make sure you reach your goal of total fruits that day.

Smoothies

Cool fruit smoothies are easy to make, can be packed with important vitamins and minerals, and make a great mean no matter what time of the day it is.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Mac Worley, Mountain View Oral Surgery and Dental Implants

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