Dental Tips Blog

Jul
15

Will Braces Change the Shape of Your Face?

Posted in Braces

One common belief is that braces may negatively change the shape of your face.

Is there any truth to that idea?

How Braces Improve Facial Structure

Getting braces isn’t the same as facial surgery.

Some people find that something they don’t like about their face is linked to the shape of their smile. Braces can correct some facial profiles by:

  • Bringing in an under-jetting jaw to elongate the face
  • Relax an upper lip and fill in sunken cheeks caused by an overbite
  • Helping lips close smoothly over front teeth

Keep in mind that these changes are only noticeable in cases of extremely crooked teeth.

What About Unwanted Changes?

People have complained about a changed face in the past due to having bicuspid teeth removed.

You’ll be happy to hear that this is not a common aspect of getting braces. Teeth only need to be pulled if the jaw is literally too small to comfortably contain all teeth that come in.

Ultimately, if there are any changes to your face after braces, they are likely to be subtle improvements. A very gentle rebalancing, if you will, that naturally follows when teeth are tucked into healthy alignment.

So why bother straightening teeth, at all?

Straight teeth are about far more than cosmetics. Crooked teeth can lead to other oral health issues including:

  • Increased risk for decay
  • Increased likelihood of gum disease
  • TMJ stress
  • Gum recession

Many people opt for orthodontic treatment if it means a healthier smile.

If you aren’t sure whether orthodontic treatment is right for you, consult a couple orthodontists in your area to get different opinions. Initial consultations are usually complimentary. Ask your local dentist for recommendations.

Posted on behalf of:
Broad Street Braces
2010 South Juniper Street
Philadelphia, PA 19148
213-234-3030

Dec
12

Are Braces Uncomfortable?

Posted in Braces

Granted, having metal wires on your teeth is not going to be a natural sensation, in the beginning. But it is something you can get used to.

Getting Braces – Does It Hurt?

The process of getting braces put on your teeth is not as bad as you might imagine. Your orthodontist applies a little conditioner to your freshly-polished enamel. This process helps the cement attach a little better. Then, the brackets are secured in place. Lastly, a wire is laced through the brackets and fastened with rubber bands.

You may feel a little discomfort in the early days of wearing braces. As that wire is first set, your teeth will resent the pressure. Just be patient as you adjust. Most patients get used to their orthodontics within a week of having them placed.

What To Do When Braces Hurt

If you seem to be experiencing more discomfort than you can tolerate, it’s usually recommended to take a painkiller; whatever you usually take for a headache is enough. Check with your doctor and orthodontist first for recommendations.

What about if the brackets are chafing your cheeks and lips? That’s a very common problem and happily, it’s easy to fix. Your orthodontist or local drugstore can supply you with some dental wax that can be molded to fit over any sharp metal pieces. It can take a bit of time before your mouth becomes accustomed to having a few rough areas of orthodontic appliances inside.

Sometimes your gums can get a little sore from gingivitis if you’re not brushing well enough. Just be patient and take care to floss!

Visit your orthodontist and local dentist regularly throughout treatment to keep your braces feeling as comfortable as possible.

Posted on behalf of:
Red Oak Family Dentistry
5345 W University Dr #200
McKinney, TX 75071
(469) 209-4279

May
1

How One Crooked Tooth Can Affect Your Smile

Posted in Orthodontics

Some people are proud of how a little quirk in their smile makes them unique. It’s true that a gap-toothed grin or a pair of “buck teeth” can be pretty cute, especially in kids.

Maybe you don’t care too much about a small flaw in your smile, either way. You should know, however, that even a seemingly insignificant irregularity can cause some trouble down the road.  Braces can help you avoid these issues.

Bad Bite Blues

One or more crooked teeth can make it hard for you to bite into your favorite sandwich. You might constantly get food stuck between overlapping teeth. If your tooth is severely misaligned, then that can even affect the way you speak.

It’s even possible for crooked teeth to throw your bite off so badly that your jaw starts to suffer.

How’s the Flossing?

When teeth are in normal alignment, they do a good job at keeping themselves clean. The natural arrangement of teeth in your jaw enable your lips and tongue to help remove a lot of debris. You just help this process along with flossing and brushing.

Put one or more of those teeth out of alignment, and part of it will miss out on the self-cleaning benefits. You probably have a hard time flossing and/or brushing around that tooth, don’t you?

Difficulty cleaning a crooked tooth leads to another problem.

Cavity Concerns

Because overlapping teeth are hard to clean, they’re prone to developing cavities. The problems don’t end there because the gums around crooked teeth are also more likely to get infected.

Contact your dentist to find out whether you should correct your tooth alignment with orthodontia.

Posted on behalf of:
Broad Street Braces
2010 South Juniper Street
Philadelphia, PA 19148
213-234-3030

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