Dental Tips Blog

Oct
22

What to Do When Your Child’s Tooth Is Knocked Out

It’s a traumatic event for everyone involved – your kid is freaking out over the blood and you’re horrified to realize a tooth is missing.

What do you do?

  1. Locate the tooth.

First of all, establish whether the tooth was an adult or baby tooth and try to find it. If it was a baby tooth that fell out prematurely, you still need to see a dentist but the situation isn’t so urgent.

When it comes to an adult tooth, on the other hand, timing is everything.

  1. Calm and clean up your child.

Bring your child to a sink where he or she can spit out blood and rinse out their mouth. Try to calm him or her down and place some clean gauze or tissue over the trauma site. Get them to bite down, as the pressure will help stop the bleeding.

  1. Clean the tooth.

When you’ve found the tooth, handle it by the crown and avoid touching the root, if the tooth is still intact. Rinse it off very gently in clean water; do not use any soap and do not scrub the tooth.

  1. Store the tooth safely.

At this point, if you have a whole, intact adult tooth in your hand, it’s a good idea to try placing it back in the socket. This is the best place since it increases the odds that the tooth will reattach to the gum fibers in the socket.

If replacing the tooth isn’t an option, store it in a small container of milk or the child’s saliva.

  1. Call a pediatric dentist ASAP.

A kid’s dentist needs to evaluate your child’s tooth to see whether successful reattachment is possible. If not, he or she will discuss options for repairing or replacing the tooth.

Posted on behalf of:
Manhattan Dental Design
315 W 57th St Suite 206
New York, NY 10019
(646) 504-4377

Oct
16

4 Questions You Have About Your Child’s New Adult Teeth

Your child’s new adult teeth are beginning to come in. Naturally, as a parent, you worry about their dental health. Here are 4 common questions and answers about your child’s new permanent teeth:

Why do my child’s new teeth have bumpy edges?

These bumps are called “mamelons,” and are completely normal. They wear off with time, which is why adults don’t have them. If they don’t start wearing off, it might be a sign that your child’s bite isn’t aligned properly.

Why haven’t my children’s adult teeth been coming in at the same rate?

It’s normal for girls’ adult teeth to come in earlier than boys. Children should start to see their permanent teeth coming in at around 6-7 years of age. If your child is 7 or 8 and hasn’t started this process, consult a dentist or pediatrician.

Why are my child’s new adult teeth are yellow?

Baby teeth are milky white, but new adult teeth appear yellow. Don’t worry, they’re actually clean and healthy. New permanent teeth have more dentin than baby teeth. This dentin is yellow in color and shows through the enamel so the adult tooth looks yellow compared with remaining baby teeth. Tooth color will look lighter with time, once all of the primary teeth fall out.

When is my child ready to start seeing a dentist?

You should have your baby see a pediatric dentist as soon as 1 year of age, or within 6 months of getting his or her first tooth. That way the dentist can make sure that everything is developing properly right from the start.

Schedule an appointment with your local dentist today to get a head start on keeping your children’s teeth healthy.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Oct
15

How to Stop Your Child’s Thumb-Sucking Habit

Thumb sucking is a normal way for babies to self-soothe. They may pick up a habit of doing so any time they are sleepy, bored, anxious, or upset.

Most of the time, babies actually start this habit while they are still in the womb, and then perfect the art of thumb sucking as they reach the toddler years.

Parents worry about their child picking up an illness from putting their thumb in their mouth after touching who-knows-what. It’s also very possible for thumb sucking to cause orthodontic and speech issues.

But it’s important to understand that thumb sucking is a normal activity for small children. Lecturing or scolding them will only make them more anxious.

Try to wait it out. Most toddler naturally quit the habit around the ages of 2-3 when they start to learn other techniques of coping with and expressing their emotions.

What if it looks like your child isn’t interested in stopping?

Children who hold onto a thumb sucking habit later into childhood also risk damaging the alignment of their adult teeth and creating a deformed palate. This will result in speech problems, an open bite, dental issues, and poor self-esteem.

Discourage thumb sucking by:

  • Praising your child when she’s not doing it
  • Helping your child become more self-aware of the habit
  • Identifying triggers for the habit
  • Distracting your child when the urge to suck comes on
  • Rewarding your child when she makes an effort to stop sucking

It takes patience and diligence to break a deeply-entrenched thumb sucking habit. Your pediatric dentist is a great resource for finding a solution that works for your child. Call to schedule a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

Sep
9

Treatment Options for Baby Teeth

Baby teeth might not seem worth the worry since ‘they’re going to fall out, anyway.’

But besides causing pain, a cavity in a baby tooth can permanently damage the incoming adult tooth. If you notice a suspicious looking spot on your child’s tooth, you’ll need to have it examined by a dentist.

Here are the most common options for treating decay in baby teeth:

Fillings

Kids can get fillings the same as adults do. Baby teeth may need a filling to stop and repair cavities if the teeth won’t fall out for several months or more.

Stainless Steel Dental Crowns

These are common for treating large cavities in baby teeth. The decay is cleaned out and the tooth reinforced with a prefabricated metal crown. This procedure is fast and the results long-lasting.

Do Nothing

Sometimes, a little spot of early decay sets in on a tooth that will fall out within the next month or two. There’s no point treating a tooth if it will come out before the cavity can cause problems.

However, it’s up to your dentist to make the call as to whether or not a cavity should be left untreated. A trained dental professional will have a good idea as to how much longer the tooth will be in the mouth.

If the tooth is very close to falling out on schedule, the dentist may even recommend pulling it right there and then. But this, too, should be an option decided at the dentist’s discretion. Pulling baby teeth too soon can cause alignment issues in the adult teeth.

Talk with your pediatric dentist about treatment options for restoring your child’s smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Sep
5

Should You Floss Baby Teeth?

Baby teeth don’t usually need to be flossed. The main point of flossing is to clean the surfaces of teeth that a toothbrush can’t reach, because they’re blocked off by the sides of other teeth.

But baby teeth tend to be very widely spaced out.

Healthy Oral Hygiene for Babies

You should be cleaning your baby’s mouth with a soft cloth after each feeding, even before the first baby teeth arrive.

When those teeth do show up, switch to a soft toothbrush and fluoridated children’s toothpaste.

Flossing doesn’t need to be introduced until a bit later in childhood.

Meeting the Challenge of Flossing

Flossing is, admittedly, a rather tedious chore. It becomes an almost impossible one when you try flossing the teeth of an uncooperative preschooler. So it’s a good thing that brushing is usually sufficient for younger children!

However, flossing is still a vital part of a healthy oral hygiene routine for adults and even kids whose teeth touch side-by-side. The sooner you introduce your kids to the idea of flossing, the easier it will be for them to pick up the habit.

Try flossers or floss picks. These plastic handles have a length of floss stretched between the U-shaped frame on one end. They make it easy for small hands to safely try flossing on their own, and they also make it easy for you to floss your child’s teeth for them.

As your child’s permanent molars start to arrive, their teeth will get more crowded. These tight spaces will need regular flossing in order to ward off decay.

Talk with your child’s dentist for tips on flossing and when to start this practice with your kids.

Posted on behalf of:
Feather Touch Dental Care
1175 Peachtree St. NW Ste 1204
Atlanta, GA 30361
(404) 892-2097

Jul
12

Is Your Child Ready to Floss?

Now that your little one has teeth, you’re wondering if it’s time to introduce flossing to him or her.

Here are a couple ways to know whether your child is ready to start cleaning between in addition to brushing:

When the Teeth Are Touching

Flossing removes food particles trapped between teeth. It also disrupts bacterial growth on the surfaces between teeth where a toothbrush can’t reach. As soon as teeth grow together so that they block out the space between them, they need to be flossed daily.

Early baby teeth don’t usually need flossing. This is because they come in with lots of space to spare. A gentle once-over with a soft toothbrush or clean cloth is enough to wick away plaque from all surfaces.

But by the time your toddler has a full dentition of twenty teeth, they may be cramped for space.

Take a good look at your child’s mouth and see whether any teeth are touching each other. Those are ones that need flossing. You should floss the teeth yourself until your child is old enough to do it herself or himself.

As Much as Your Child Tolerates

The earlier you introduce activities like brushing and flossing, the more likely your child is to tolerate them. Flossing can be tougher than brushing since it’s a more meticulous and time-consuming job.

Take things slow starting out. Don’t force a toddler to sit still while you floss all twenty teeth. Do as much as your child will happily tolerate and praise him or her for their patience and effort. Keep flossing a positive activity and emphasize the health benefits.

Talk with your child’s dentist for more tips on safe and effective flossing for kids.

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518
678.730.2005

May
13

What to Do When Your Child Refuses to Brush

You know that brushing those pearly-whites every day is important to your child’s health. But your little one doesn’t understand that fact, just yet.

What can you do if your child flat-out refuses to cooperate with a tooth-brushing routine?

Here are some ideas to try.

Consult Your Child While Shopping

Most parents don’t like too much input from their junior members while grocery shopping. But your kids may be more inclined to brush their teeth if they get to pick out a toothbrush and toothpaste they like.

Set Up a Reward System

A reward system can help your child to make positive associations with their tooth-brushing routine. Offer a treat, party, or special outing for reaching a goal of brushing so many times per week or month.

Explain Things in Terms Your Child Understands

While saying “it’s good for you” may not be a sufficient explanation for your kids, you can still motivate them to brush if you explain the reason in details they can appreciate.

Try to keep the motivation positive. But don’t hesitate to tap into your kid’s concerns to help them see how brushing is beneficial.

For example, if your child is a neat-freak, let him or her know that they need to brush to keep their teeth white and clean. If your child hates going to the dentist, tell them that if they brush, their checkups will be easier.

Is your child freaked out by bugs? Tiny plaque bugs will eat holes in their teeth if they don’t brush them away every day.

Talk with a pediatric or family dentist in your area to get more tips on motivating your kids to brush.

Posted on behalf of:
Muccioli Dental
6300 Hospital Pkwy # 275
Johns Creek, GA 30097
(678) 389-995

Apr
22

Should Your Kids Use Fluoride Toothpaste?

For many years, it was believed that toddlers should not have fluoride. But in light of how many babies are suffering from cavities, pediatric dentists and other health authorities have changed the recommendation.

Even Babies Need Fluoride

The first moment baby’s first teeth peek out of the gums, they are susceptible to cavities. From that point on, the enamel can benefit from regular fluoride exposure.

It’s not only okay, it’s now advised for parents to use a fluoride toothpaste with their babies and toddlers.

It’s mom and dad’s job to clean their child’s teeth and then continue to help them brush until they’re responsible enough to tie their own shoelaces. At that point, your child should also be well-practiced in spitting out excess toothpaste after brushing.

Isn’t Fluoride Dangerous for Kids?

Swallowing large amounts of fluoride at once can cause trouble. But the same goes for many other “safe” household and hygiene products, or even multivitamins.

You will be responsible for keeping fluoride toothpaste and rinses out of reach of children who cannot yet use them correctly. Ingesting a large amount of fluoride at once can be dangerous and you should seek medical help.

Frequently swallowing very small amounts of fluoride over many years during tooth development can cause a slight esthetic change in your child’s teeth.

But you have control over this aspect, as well, by ensuring your baby or toddler has only a rice grain-sized smear of toothpaste on the brush. Children age 3 and up may be able to handle a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.

If you’re still uncertain, then by all means consult your family’s dentist. He or she will know best which kind of toothpaste is right for your kids.

Posted on behalf of:
Dunwoody Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
1816 Independence Square, Suite B
Dunwoody, GA 30338
(770) 399-9199

Mar
31

How to Help When Your Child’s First Molars Come In

The first baby molars show up around age one to one and a half. The next ones come in around age two. Later on in childhood the six-year molars arrive. These are the first adult teeth to show up behind the baby teeth.

Molars are very different from incisors, which easily break through the gums. They have more surface area to work out of the gums. By the time molars come in, your child will be needing them to chew on solid foods. The gum tissue covering a new molar can get irritated and inflamed if bitten on while chewing.

So what can you do to ease your child’s discomfort while molars erupt?

Relief for Sore Gums

Offer soft foods like applesauce and yogurt and soups that aren’t too hot.

Icy teething rings are also helpful. Instead of a toy, you can provide the snack of a raw whole carrot, washed, chilled, and peeled. This will allow your child to massage the gums while cooling them and enjoying a healthy snack.

Ask your child’s pediatric dentist about safe pain-relief medications.

Keep your child’s gums clean as those teeth emerge! The tissue covering molars can easily get infected from food and bacteria buildup.

Healthy Molars for Life

Baby’s primary molars are important because they act as placeholders for what will be the adult bicuspids. Those baby molars may not be lost until as late as age 13. In some rare cases where the adult tooth is not present, the baby tooth may stay in place for life.

Make sure all of your child’s teeth are healthy and accounted for. Schedule a checkup with your child’s dentist.

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

Mar
30

5 Myths About Your Child’s Oral Hygiene

A healthy smile is an essential part of your child’s wellbeing. To protect it, you need to know the truth about what is and what isn’t good for kids’ smiles.

Here are some common myths to be wary of:

  1. Baby teeth don’t matter since they’re going to fall out, anyway.

Your child will hold onto some of those baby teeth until he’s 11 or 12 years old. That’s a long time to live with a toothache! Cavities can spread to the new adult teeth. Treat baby teeth whenever your pediatric dentist recommends it.

  1. Juice is healthier than soda.

Nope, it’s about the same! Sugar and acid galore!

  1. Kids should brush after breakfast for fresh breath.

Brushing right after meals only spreads food acids around the enamel. Everyone should wait for at least a half hour after eating to brush. Get your kids’ brushing over with first thing in the morning if there’s no time to do it after breakfast.

  1. Children don’t need to see a dentist until they’re old enough to sit still.

The appearance of the first baby tooth is occasion enough for the first dental visit! Babies don’t need dental cleanings, but it’s good for your pediatric dentist to check on their tooth development.

  1. Kids need to rinse after brushing or they could swallow fluoride.

Rinsing defeats fluoride’s purpose of strengthening teeth! Kids should spit after brushing. That’s enough to get out the excess fluoride. They should have no more than a pea-sized amount of toothpaste on their brush to begin with. If your child consistently spits after brushing, their teeth will benefit and they’ll be at no risk for fluoride toxicity.

Visit your child’s dentist to debunk more dental myths.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

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