Dental Tips Blog

Jan
27

Want Healthier Gums? Do These 7 Things Every Night Before Bed

Posted in Gum Disease

Are you suffering from gingivitis? Adding these seven steps to your evening routine could make a major difference in your gum health.

  1. Eat a Salad

Vitamin C is essential to healthy gums. Get more than your daily recommended amount of vitamin C in just one serving of the right fresh fruits or veggies. Aim for guava, red peppers, strawberries, broccoli, kale, and oranges.

  1. Swish with Water After Dinner

Acids and sugar from your meals linger long after you’re done eating. This process fuels the growth of bacteria that cause gum inflammation. You shouldn’t brush immediately after dinner since that can spread the acids around. Rinse well with water and wait about a half hour before you brush.

  1. Brush Longer Than Usual

Pay special attention to brushing along the gum-line. Just scrubbing the front of your teeth isn’t enough. Take your time, brushing for at least two minutes.

  1. Use an Antigingivitis Toothpaste

Antigingivitis toothpastes contain an ingredient called triclosan, a mild antibacterial agent. While triclosan is no longer recommended in hand soap, it’s still very effective at controlling bacterial growth in the gums.

  1. Floss Thoroughly

Flossing removes germs and debris from between teeth and gums where a toothbrush can’t reach. You may find it easier to floss at night versus in the morning when you’re busy.

  1. Massage Your Gums

A blunt-tipped gum stimulator rubbed along your gum-line encourages healthy circulation and toughens up delicate tissues.

  1. Rinse with an Antibacterial Mouthwash

Anti-plaque rinses contain therapeutic essential oils that inhibit bacterial growth. Rinsing for thirty seconds after brushing will help reduce gum inflammation.

Ask your periodontist for more tips on how to keep your gums healthy.

Posted on behalf of:
Group Health Dental
230 W 41st St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 398-9690

Nov
26

Why Should You See a Periodontist for Gum Disease?

Posted in Periodontics

Gum disease is serious for a few reasons. It can…

  • Result in tooth loss
  • Adversely affect your overall health
  • Quickly spread to other teeth
  • Be difficult to control

Right now, there is no miracle pill you can take at one time to just make gum disease go away. Neither will it heal on its own.

If you’re diagnosed with some degree of gum disease, you need to have it monitored and treated by a gum health expert, like your dentist or hygienists.

In some cases, a general dentist can oversee gum health treatment from start to finish.

But at what point is it time to visit a gum specialist?

What Is a Periodontist?

A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in treating gum tissue and other structures around the roots of teeth. He or she has 3-4 years of additional formal education in treating gum diseases.

Periodontists perform surgical procedures to correct gum problems, clean tooth roots, place dental implants, and even reconstruct the bone and gums around teeth. These are treatments which most general dentists don’t have either the time or training to do.

When to See a Gum Specialist

Your gum health may be at a point that’s beyond managing in a regular dental office. Your dentist may then recommend that you visit a specialist like a periodontist or oral surgeon for more in-depth cleaning and other therapies.

If you haven’t gotten a recommendation from your dentist but are still concerned about your gum health, it’s perfectly fine to contact a specialist yourself, without a referral.

For an assessment with a periodontist or oral surgeon your area, ask your general dentist for a referral.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Sep
12

Does Your Child Have Gingivitis?

Posted in Gum Disease

Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums. It’s a response to irritating plaque bacteria left on the teeth. When teeth aren’t brushed at least twice a day, the germs can cause gums to  become sensitive, swollen, and bleed easily.

Kids are just as prone to getting gingivitis as adults are. If not treated, gingivitis can lead to periodontitis (gum disease) and eventually even tooth loss.

Fortunately, gum disease can be treated with periodontal therapy by your dentist or periodontist.  It’s important for you to recognize signs of gum problems in your kids to promote a healthy smile from a young age.

Signs of Gingivitis

Your child may be suffering from gingivitis if you notice that they have:

  • Persistent bad breath
  • Bright red puffy gums
  • Thick yellowish buildup on their teeth
  • Complaints of sore gums
  • Bleeding that’s spontaneous or triggered by brushing or flossing

Why Kids Are Prone to Gingivitis

You likely help your small children with their tooth brushing. But as kids get older, they crave more independence. They want to take care of their own hygiene needs and you’re happy to encourage them.

Just because kids can brush their teeth on their own doesn’t mean they’re good at doing it regularly. Children may slack off on brushing, only doing it once a day at the most. A lack of brushing and flossing is the primary cause of gingivitis.

Kids on the verge of puberty tend to have more sensitive gums that overreact to dental plaque. Hormones in the body can trigger chronic cases of gingivitis.

If You Suspect Gingivitis

Gingivitis isn’t something your child has to live with forever. In fact, you can easily treat and prevent gum inflammation with regular dental visits and a bit of extra help at home. Plan a checkup for every member of your family to keep gum disease from becoming a permanent resident in your house!

Posted on behalf of:
Group Health Dental
230 W 41st St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 398-9690

May
20

What Are Periodontal Pockets?

Posted in Gum Disease

You may have heard the term “periodontal pockets” thrown around once or twice by a dental hygienist during your cleaning.

What exactly are they?

How Periodontitis Affects Your Teeth

Gum disease (periodontitis) starts out as an accumulation of bacterial plaque on teeth. If this plaque isn’t removed, it causes inflammation in the gum line. If this swelling isn’t reversed, it can spread and involve the ligaments that anchor teeth in place (periodontal tissues).

Your body reacts to the infection by sending out chemicals. Unfortunately, this reaction causes more damage to ligaments. Eventually, the gums pull away from your tooth roots entirely.

The bacteria multiply and invade the new empty space and the process continues. As things progress, even the bone surrounding teeth can start to break down. This results in a distinct gap, or “pocket,” between the tooth and your tissues.

Periodontal pockets are bad news. Not only do these gaps signify a loss of attachment for your tooth, but they are nearly impossible to keep clean. You’ll never be able to control the bacteria and tartar settling into those pockets with a toothbrush and floss, alone.

Do You Have Periodontal Pockets?

Your dental hygienist will do routine gum measurements to see whether any of your teeth have lost their gum and tooth support.

These measurements are recorded in millimeters on a chart. Measurements of 3mm or less are within the healthy range of snug gum tissue. A few 4mm areas suggest some gum inflammation. But areas higher than 5mm are a definite sign that your mouth needs periodontal treatment.

Call your local dentist to schedule a gum health evaluation and find out how you can prevent gum disease.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

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