Dental Tips Blog

Apr
14

The Truth About DIY Fillings

Posted in Fillings

Filling your tooth at home may seem like the easy way out when you want to save a buck or skip a trip to the dental office.

But DIY fillings aren’t the miracle solution they may seem to be.

DIY Dental Filling Kits Can Be Dangerous

Without actual dental treatment experience, you could put too much patch-up material in your tooth, damage your it further, or accidentally swallow something you shouldn’t.

Additionally, you can’t just cover over a cavity with filling material and call it good. Tooth decay is an active bacterial infection, and the cavity will only spread underneath the filling if a dentist doesn’t properly clean out the decay before filling your tooth.

You’ll Pay More for a Job that Wasn’t Done Right the First Time

Using a cheap DIY kit to fill your tooth may feel like a smart move. But you can end up spending more money for an actual dentist to repair the damage done by a kit you bought online.

Temporary Fillings Are Just That – Temporary!

There are plenty of products available in drugstores that are labeled as temporary dental cements. These kits contain a quick-setting filler and instructions for filling a tooth when you’re in a pinch.

But these kits are temporary for a reason. The cement isn’t the same kind of long-lasting filling material you’d get in a professional treatment. It only holds up for a limited amount of time (like while you’re away on vacation.)

Temporary cements are not substitutes for real dental fillings. They just tide you over when you’re in a situation where you can’t see a dentist.

Visit your dentist to learn more about the importance of professional dental fillings and alternatives that might be available.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Feb
17

4 Smile-Healthy Summertime Snack Ideas for Kids

Posted in Fillings

With warm weather comes the need for refreshing and energizing fuel to keep little bodies healthy all summer long.

Here are a few simple snack ideas that you can offer your kids without raising their risk for tooth decay. Read the rest of this entry »

Sep
5

Signs You May Need a Dental Filling

Posted in Fillings

Getting a filling isn’t exactly at the top of your list of favorite things.

But your tooth may need a filling sooner than you realize. Putting it off could leave you in severe pain or a painful dental bill, at the least.

Here are a few signs you need to see about getting your tooth filled before it needs a crown, root canal, or extraction.

Food and Temperature Sensitivity

If your tooth really zings in the presence of hot drinks, sticky sweets, or sour foods, then that’s a pretty sure sign you have an active cavity.

Dark Spots

A discolored spot that looks dark yellow, gray, brown, or even black could indicate decay. It is normal to have some stain that doesn’t contain a cavity, but if a spot is new or you’re in doubt, get it checked out.

Pain When Chewing

Do you find yourself favoring one side of your mouth over the other when you chew? If a tooth hurts when you chew on it, then that could mean it has a cavity or even a crack.

Rough Edges

Does floss catch and tear on the side of one particular tooth these days? Rough spots can sometimes be the sharp edges of a hole caused by decay.

Damaged or Missing Old Filling

If you already have a filling that’s suffered some wear and tear, it will likely need replacement. A damaged restoration can’t do its job and with time can allow cavity-causing bacteria to sneak into the tooth. The sooner you get the old filling replaced, the more minimal your treatment is likely to be.

Visit your local dentist if you notice any of these signs that you need a filling.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Jan
25

3 Ways to Make Your Fillings Last Longer

Posted in Fillings

Unfortunately for all of us, dental fillings just cannot last forever.

That’s the case, for now at least. In the meantime, you definitely want to do your best to avoid having your dental fillings updated or replaced more frequently than you really need to. Here are a few ways how:

  1. Brush and Floss DAILY

Yes, good oral hygiene doesn’t just benefit teeth – it’s good for all your restorations, too. White fillings can occasionally pick up stain around the edges if you don’t brush and rinse away those dark-staining foods.

Fillings – both white and silver – fail when a tooth develops a new cavity under or near them. It’s very important that you diligently clean your teeth even after you get a filling. A restoration does not make a tooth invincible!

  1. Get Plenty of Fluoride

When a tooth gets a filling, it’s compromised for the rest of its life. The microscopic seam between tooth and composite or amalgam material becomes a potential site for bacterial infection.

Fluoride in toothpaste and rinses fortifies tooth enamel against bacteria and acid attacks. Your teeth need lots of this mineral after being filled.

  1. Use a Mouth Guard at Night

Many fillings are quickly worn down when their owners grind their teeth. A tooth clenching or grinding habit usually happens at night when you’re not aware of it, so it’s nearly impossible to control.

A customized mouth guard worn while you sleep can help you avoid fracturing, loosening, or wearing down your fillings.

When well-cared for, fillings can last ten years, fifteen years, or possibly longer. Find out what more you can do to make your valuable restorations last by visiting your dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Enamel Dentistry
2717 S Lamar Blvd #1086
Austin, TX 78704
(512) 717-5315

Nov
18

Dental Fillings 101

Posted in Fillings

Dental fillings are used to fill in the area on a tooth that has been removed due to a cavity. Dental fillings are also used to repair cracked or broken teeth in cases of injury or from teeth being worn down. Dentists are specialists in the area of treating the teeth and can be trusted to fill your teeth with precision and care.

If you require a dental filling, you will have an appointment at the dentist office. Most often the dentist will use a local anesthetic to numb the area around the tooth to be filled. (In some cases where the cavity is at the surface of a tooth, an anesthetic is not needed because the sensitive roots of the tooth will not be touched.) The dentist will then remove the decayed area of the tooth with a tool that is precise at cutting small amounts of enamel.

Once the decayed area is removed, your dentist will test the remaining area of the tooth to ensure that all of the decay has been removed. Once it has been determined that the decay is extracted, the dentist will clean the cavity thoroughly to remove all bacteria. Then the dentist will fill in the cavity with a specialized material that you and your dentist agreed on ahead of time.

It is essential to your oral health to have any cavities in your teeth filled by your dentist as quickly as possible. Because cavities are formed by decay, the teeth surrounding your tooth with the cavity can become infected by the decay. With good oral hygiene practices your filling should last you for years – if not your entire life.

Posted on behalf of Patrick O’Brien DMD, Carolina Comfort Dental

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