Dental Tips Blog

Aug
3

3 Worst Drinks for Your Smile

Why, oh why, do we have such a love-hate relationship with beverages?

In the non-stop pace of daily life, we’ve come to depend on the sugary and energizing drinks that are so readily available to us. The issue is simply that the most popular (and tastiest) beverages tend to be the worst for our teeth.  They cause tooth enamel erosion leading to tooth decay.  You can avoid unnecessary dental work such as fillings and crowns by limiting your consumption of certain beverages.

Take a look at just three examples:

  1. Soda

We all know sugary soda is bad news for teeth. But did you realize just how bad? Other tooth-harming ingredients in soda include:

  • Carbonation
  • Citric acid
  • Phosphoric acid
  • Caramel color

This makes for a powerhouse combination of enamel-eaters!

  1. Sports Drinks

Because sports drinks tend to be affiliated with physical activity, people tend to think that they are a healthy drink option.

Actually, they’re intended for cases of dehydration, which is why they’re loaded with sugar. That, in turn, is what increases the chance of tooth decay. On top of this, these liquids are also packed with citric acid which is also bad for enamel (it’s even worse than soda.)

  1. Coffee

How many sugary iced lattes do you sip on throughout the day?

Even if you take your coffee straight up, you aren’t sparing yourself the acidic effect it has on tooth enamel. Also, whether you like your coffee plain or loaded with cream, the dark pigments will leave a stain.

These drinks in moderation keep life interesting. But the next time you crave a pick-me-up, why not give your body what it needs? Good old water!

Get tips on making smile-smart drink choices. Check in with your local dentist to find out how you can keep your teeth strong, clean, and cavity-resistant.

Posted on behalf of:
Muccioli Dental
6300 Hospital Pkwy # 275
Johns Creek, GA 30097
(678) 389-9955

Aug
3

What is an Overdenture?

Posted in Dental Implants

An overdenture is simply a dental prosthesis that rests slightly above your gums. It’s usually supported by dental implants, so it puts the bite force directly into your jawbone instead of your gums.

Some overdentures are more like traditional dentures in the way they rest on your gums, but they all provide a more secure bite because of having implants to help hold them in place.

Who Can Have An Overdenture?

People who have minimal bone to support a full classic denture could really use the extra support of implants. Implants give the mouth greater height, which preserves the shape of the smile and the power of your bite.

An overdenture is still removable like any other denture, but it stays in place much better.

Basically, if you’re exhausted from dealing with a regular denture, then an overdenture may be worth your consideration!

Benefits Of Overdentures

In today’s fast-paced society, fewer people want to settle for the hassle and stigma of wearing a traditional denture. Overdentures are gaining in popularity because of these benefits:

  • Can be removed for easy cleaning
  • No more worrying about denture adhesives
  • Hide a high smile line with a tall prosthesis (avoid showing a gap between the denture and your gums)
  • Enjoy having the shape of your original smile
  • Laugh without fear of your teeth slipping!

Is an overdenture right for you? You’ll have to discuss that with your dentist. There are many different ways to replace teeth, especially when dental implants are involved. Careful treatment planning can help you find a solution that matches your lifestyle and smile needs.

Contact your dentist today to schedule a consultation.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Aug
3

What is an Abscess?

Posted in Root Canals

“Abscess” is that scary “A-word” no one likes to hear at the dental office! The infection occurs when the tissues inside a tooth becomes inflamed from bacteria that enter the sterile nerve chamber. The infection can’t escape through the hard tooth structure, so instead, it travels through the root tips and out the side of your jaw.

If the abscess isn’t relieved and treated, it can cause severe damage to other teeth and the infection can even travel to other areas in your body.

Signs Of An Abscess

  • Swelling around your tooth
  • Throbbing pain
  • Temperature sensitivity
  • Tenderness to biting pressure
  • Fever
  • Pimple on the gums next to a tooth
  • An noticeable salty taste or smell in your mouth

Sometimes, you can have an abscess and not feel anything. This is one of the reasons regular dental checkups with x-rays are so important!

Think You Have a Dental Abscess? What You Should Do

Call your local dentist right away. Take a doctor-approved painkiller. Place an ice pack on the side of your face if you have any swelling. Your dentist will see you at the earliest opportunity since abscesses can’t wait! Visit the emergency room if you have difficulty swallowing or breathing.

Treatment For An Abscess

When you get to your dentist’s, he or she will likely prescribe you an antibiotic to reduce the number of bacteria present. If the damage is severe enough, the abscessed tooth may need to be extracted. In many cases, a tooth can be saved with root canal therapy.

If you suspect you have an abscess, don’t wait! The sooner you take action, the greater your chances of keeping your tooth.

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

Aug
3

How Fluoride Can Damage Kids’ Teeth

Is fluoride good for kids or not? There is a lot of information out there on behalf of both schools of thought. Some people believe that fluoride is a toxin while others advocate it passionately.

What do you know about how fluoride affects teeth?

Fluoride is a naturally-occurring mineral found all over the world. It’s an established fact that it strengthens enamel, but since it isn’t vital for life, it’s not considered a vitamin.

Cavities start when tooth enamel is worn down through a process called demineralization. Fluoride reinforces enamel to make it resistant to acids and bacteria.

Because fluoride is so good for building up tooth defenses, it’s good for kids to get plenty while their teeth are still developing.

But opponents of the mineral point to something called “dental fluorosis” to illustrate why the mineral is potentially dangerous.

What is Dental Fluorosis?

Dental fluorosis is when too much fluoride is ingested during tooth development, causing incomplete enamel formation. The affected teeth may sport just a few chalky spots of decalcification or, in extreme cases, be mottled brown and pitted.

While these affected teeth are plenty resistant to cavities, they lose their potentially luminous appearance.

Why it Matters When the Exposure Occurs

Depending on how much fluoride a person is exposed to and when, the degree of fluorosis can vary. Typically, from birth until age 6 or 7 kids are most vulnerable to the effects of fluoride. After that point, the teeth are fully developed and cannot be adversely affected by fluoride any longer.

Young children need to have their fluoride levels carefully monitored. Some of this mineral, both topical and ingestible, is necessary for healthy teeth. But swallowing too much over time can cause unwanted changes in the teeth.

Talk with your dentist about safe fluoride use for your family.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Aug
3

Is Dental Sedation Safe for Children?

Dental sedation uses specific drugs to help someone relax during a procedure. It’s used for patients of all ages, but is especially good for children who may be too young or nervous to tolerate treatment.

Sedation keeps the routine treatments routine; and the complicated procedures simpler and comfortable.

Sedation in Pediatric Dentistry

Kids qualify for the same dental sedation techniques as adults do. The doses are just a lot smaller!

These include oral medication, laughing gas, IV-administered sedative, and general anesthesia. If your child ever needs general anesthesia, that’s provided in a hospital or dental surgery.

The other methods are very low-risk to administer as long as everything is carefully planned.

Make Sedation Dentistry Safer

Parents play a key role in ensuring that their child enjoys a safe and successful procedure. It’s essential to follow the dentist’s instructions to a T.

These often include:

  • Dietary restrictions in the hours before treatment
  • Dressing the child in loose-fitting clothing
  • Sharing the child’s complete medical history
  • Not bringing along other kids who can cause a distraction
  • Comforting their child

Everyone is closely monitored during sedation treatment, but kids in particular. The dental team will be constantly checking things like blood pressure, temperature, and heart rate.

There’s no reason to be nervous about kids getting sedation when everyone does their part to keep treatment safe!

When Your Child Needs Sedation

Remember that sedation helps your child to stay safe and relaxed during delicate dental procedures. They’ll feel much better about dozing or giggling their way through treatment than struggling in fear and frustration.

Talk with your dentist about which sedation options are best for your family.

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. David Kurtzman D.D.S.
611 Campbell Hill St. NW #101
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 980-6336

Aug
3

Prepare for Your Child Getting Braces

Posted in Braces

You may feel overwhelmed as your child gets ready to start braces. But don’t worry – with these tips in mind, it’s easier than you think!

Your Child is an Active Participant

Kids are likely to cooperate with their orthodontic treatment when they realize that they can have a meaningful contribution. They’re proud to do something important!

When making decisions, try to include your child to the extent their maturity allows. At the very least, explain the treatment rationale in a way they’ll understand. This way, they won’t feel like they’re always a victim of circumstance.

Some aspects of orthodontic treatment allow room for personal expression. Let your child choose the colors of his or her bands and design the pattern on the retainer’s plate. A little creative freedom will help your child to find something enjoyable in wearing braces.

Stay Positive

While you may have some bad memories of orthodontic treatment you yourself have had, don’t let negative views discourage your child.

Avoid criticizing your son or daughter. They won’t do everything right and may need constant reminders, but make an effort to instill confidence in them rather than discouraging them about a lack of responsibility. Instead, offer to follow up behind them to clean areas they may have missed.

Show Your Support

Make your home a braces-friendly environment! Find a variety of cleaning devices that will make flossing easier on your child. Replace sticky crunchy snacks with healthier alternatives in your kitchen. Set up a rewards system that encourages your child to maintain a healthy smile.

The process may feel long, but the outcome will be worth it! For more tips on successfully getting your child through orthodontic treatment, see your local dentist or orthodontist.

Posted on behalf of:
East Cobb Orthodontics
2810 Lassiter Rd
Marietta, GA 30062
(770) 993-7118

Aug
3

What to Do When You Fracture a Tooth

Without a doubt, breaking a tooth can be scary and painful. But there’s no need to panic! A few simple precautions can help you minimize the damage and even save your tooth entirely.

  1. Determine How Your Tooth Broke

Teeth sometimes fracture without showing any outward signs of damage. You might know something’s wrong because the tooth will be very temperature sensitive or hurt when you release your bite.

Locate any missing pieces if your tooth suffered an obvious fracture or chip. You don’t want to accidentally swallow any of them, especially if your dentist can bond them back in place.

  1. Rinse

Swishing with warm water to cleanse the area is a good idea. If there is any bleeding, firmly but gently pack some gauze around the tooth. A tea bag is also helpful since it promotes blood clotting.

  1. Ice

Numb the area around your sore tooth by icing your cheek or lip outside your mouth. This can help to bring down swelling. Take a painkiller, if needed.

  1. See Your Dentist or Oral Surgeon ASAP

You will definitely need an x-ray or two to determine the full extent of the damage. If your root is fractured, a tooth extraction may be necessary. Otherwise, your dentist may be able to save it with a dental crown or root canal.

Small damage, like a painless chip, can often be smoothed out with just a bit of bonding.

It’s also possible to bruise the ligaments around your tooth. If this happens, your tooth will hurt for a few days without actually having suffered a fracture.

The only way you’ll know for sure is to see your dentist or oral surgeon as soon as possible!

Posted on behalf of:
Stafford Oral Surgery & Specialists
481 Garrisonville Rd. Suite 103
Stafford, VA 22554
(540) 322-1808

Aug
3

How to Design the Perfect Oral Hygiene Routine

What’s the golden secret to a knock-out Hollywood smile?

Routine dental checkups and cleanings are important and there are a variety of cosmetic dental treatments that will improve your smile, but it all starts with customized oral hygiene right at home.

Choose The Right Brush

First, you need to decide on a toothbrush that will get the job done properly. Not just any kind will do! Look for one with the softest bristles possible. These are kind to gums.

It’s also good to consider whether you want to stick with a classic manual brush or try a powered one. Electric toothbrushes are great for anyone, but they’re extremely helpful to those who have difficulty manipulating a traditional one.

Which Toothpaste Is Best?

Toothpastes are formulated differently to address problems such as sensitivity, decay, and gingivitis. Whichever kind you decide on, make sure it contains fluoride since all teeth need extra cavity-protection.

Cleaning Between Teeth

The next area to consider is how to access those spots that your toothbrush cannot reach. For most people, a basic waxed tape floss is sufficient. But don’t limit yourself! If you find that kind of floss is too hard to use or it even hurts your gums, explore some other options.

There is more fine ribbon floss, fluffy tufted floss, floss on handles, water flossers, and more. It’s all about finding the option that works well and feels good.

Get Help Designing The Perfect Routine

Your dentist and dental hygienist are your best resources when it comes to oral care. They’ll consider your smile’s unique needs and give you tailored suggestions for products and tools you might never have discovered on your own.

The journey to the perfect smile starts right at home! Learn more by planning a visit to your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

Aug
3

Yes, Losing Your Tooth IS a Big Deal!

Posted in Dental Implants

Contrary to what many people believe, there’s nothing natural about losing teeth. Even so, what’s so bad about missing just one or two teeth?

Missing Teeth and Alignment

The biggest issue comes down to is your smile’s alignment. Your teeth are always looking to be on the move. If there’s an empty space directly above or below them, they will try to grow to fill it. If there’s an empty space in front of them, they will drift forward to fill it.

Unfortunately, it throws off your entire bite when teeth tip out of line. It may become harder to chew. Those crooked teeth will be harder to keep clean and restore. They can also become vulnerable to diseases that make them fall out.

A bad bite could also potentially lead to TMJ complications and chronic headaches.

A Broken Smile?

Missing teeth can significantly affect the shape of your smile. This isn’t just because there is a gap or two. The bone in your jaw is reinforced by the presence of tooth roots. Without teeth, that bone will start to shrink and create craters in the gums.

Why You Should Replace Missing Teeth

In summary, missing teeth can result in:

  • Disease to other teeth
  • Alignment and bite problems
  • Collapsed smile
  • Difficulty fitting other restorations

Basically, the more teeth you are missing, the sooner the ones you have left will follow suit!  There are many options to replace missing teeth including dental implants, dentures, and a bridge or partial bridge.

Check with your dentist to find out whether your missing teeth have the potential to cause trouble. If so, talk to your dentist about which restoration options that are right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Center For Restorative, Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry
711 Greenbriar Pkwy, Suite 101
Chesapeake, VA 23320
(757) 547-2770

Aug
3

Fight Gum Disease with Mouthwash? Here’s How

Posted in Gum Disease

First of all, let’s get one thing straight: there is no mouthwash that can cure gum disease…no matter how great the commercial looks!

But with the help of the right kind of rinse, you can be successful in preventing bacterial buildup that contributes to gum infections.

Your Local Drugstore

Generic over-the-counter rinses that boast anti-microbial properties are very effective in limiting plaque buildup.

Look for something like Listerine that states it’s “anti-plaque” or “anti-gingivitis.” You need more than a minty fresh rinse, here. These formulations contain essential oils which prevent bacteria from sticking to your teeth and gums.

Using use a mouthwash like this once or twice a day, in addition to brushing and flossing to keep your gums in great shape.

Prescription-Strength Mouthwash

If you are battling ongoing infection or have just had periodontal therapy, your dentist may prescribe a medicated rinse called chlorhexidine gluconate. As a powerful antibacterial rinse, it helps you avoid plaque development, giving your gums a jump-start toward healing.

The Most Reliable Way To Beat Gum Disease

Periodontitis is a very tricky infection. It’s often chronic and rages below the gum line where toothbrush, floss, and even a rinse can’t access. Inflamed gum tissues and pieces of tartar shelter bacteria that produce the irritating toxins.

Physical mechanical removal is still the best way to get rid of the culprits. This means a professional deep cleaning to scoop out tartar, plaque, and germs from pockets around teeth. Afterwards, your dentist may prescribe an antibiotic and/or an anti-bacterial rinse to wrap things up.

There are plenty of herbal and other natural supplements out there which may claim to fight gum disease. Just make sure to check these with your dentist to make sure you get the fullest benefit.

Posted on behalf of:
Les Belles NYC Dentistry
420 Lexington Ave #228
New York, NY 10170
212-804-8884

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…