Dental Tips Blog

Mar
30

Think Your Filling Is Too High? What You Can Do

Posted in Fillings

Almost all of us have had that sensation that a new dental restoration is too big for our tooth.

It can take a while for a new filling to seem like it fits at just the right point of feeling natural.

But what about when it’s been months since you got the filling and your tooth still feels bulky?

Signs Your Filling Is Too Big

  • Aching jaw
  • Sensation you always have something stuck in a tooth
  • Difficulty flossing
  • The tooth opposite from the one with the filling hurts

Why It Matters

A large filling may not look that bad, at first glance. Even the first few times you chew with it may not feel unusual. But the difference can show up subtly over time.

The tiniest discrepancy in tooth height can throw your bite out of balance. Eventually, this would lead to uneven tooth wear, a sore jaw, pain, and even sensitivity.

Get Your Filling Fixed!

Unfortunately, there’s not much you can do at home to repair a high filling. Anything you could attempt would only be dangerous. You’d risk damaging the filling and even permanently harming your tooth.

The solution for a high filling is simple: your dentist drills and polishes it down.

In a procedure that lasts just a few minutes, your dentist will check the fit of the restoration and grind it down. Only your dentist can determine exactly which spots should be filed to create a comfortable fit. This is such a quick and noninvasive job that you won’t even need any anesthesia.

Is your new dental restoration bothering you?

Get it checked as soon as possible to see what can be done. Don’t put up with the pain – call your dentist today.

Posted on behalf of:
Montevallo Family Dentistry
711 Wadsworth St
Montevallo, AL 35115
(205) 665-2224

Mar
30

Older Women with Gum Disease May Be at Higher Risk for Cancer, Study Finds

Posted in Gum Disease

Gum disease has been associated with conditions like diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, heart disease, and erectile dysfunction, just to name a few. But now researchers are wondering about how chronic gum disease could affect a person’s cancer risk.

What the Study Found

Researchers at the State University of New York at Buffalo took a look at medical data collected over the course of eight years. The subjects of the data were postmenopausal women, most of them white.

The research findings showed an interesting pattern: women with periodontal disease (gum disease) were 14% more likely to develop cancer than those without gum disease. Whether the women smoked or not didn’t make a difference.

Site-specific cancers noted in these women’s health histories included lung, breast, skin, and gallbladder cancer. But the highest risk was for esophageal cancer.

What This Could Mean

Since gum disease has established links to other health problems, there may be some connection to cancer risk. Scientists have to study further what those connections may be and who are really at risk.

What This Doesn’t Mean

Not all older women with dental problems will develop cancer. This study was limited in scope. All though the finding was significant, it proved no direct connection between gum disease and cancer.

Keep Your Gums Healthy!

Good oral hygiene doesn’t just prevent tooth – loss; it could lower your cancer risk. A healthy diet rich in vitamins is also key to gum health. Lower your chancer further by reducing stress and avoiding tobacco use.

No matter age or gender, gum health is important to all. Regular gum health evaluations are an important part of oral hygiene. Schedule a checkup with a dentist near you.

Posted on behalf of:
Mitzi Morris, DMD, PC
1295 Hembree Rd B202
Roswell, GA 30076
(770) 475-6767

Mar
30

5 Myths About Your Child’s Oral Hygiene

A healthy smile is an essential part of your child’s wellbeing. To protect it, you need to know the truth about what is and what isn’t good for kids’ smiles.

Here are some common myths to be wary of:

  1. Baby teeth don’t matter since they’re going to fall out, anyway.

Your child will hold onto some of those baby teeth until he’s 11 or 12 years old. That’s a long time to live with a toothache! Cavities can spread to the new adult teeth. Treat baby teeth whenever your pediatric dentist recommends it.

  1. Juice is healthier than soda.

Nope, it’s about the same! Sugar and acid galore!

  1. Kids should brush after breakfast for fresh breath.

Brushing right after meals only spreads food acids around the enamel. Everyone should wait for at least a half hour after eating to brush. Get your kids’ brushing over with first thing in the morning if there’s no time to do it after breakfast.

  1. Children don’t need to see a dentist until they’re old enough to sit still.

The appearance of the first baby tooth is occasion enough for the first dental visit! Babies don’t need dental cleanings, but it’s good for your pediatric dentist to check on their tooth development.

  1. Kids need to rinse after brushing or they could swallow fluoride.

Rinsing defeats fluoride’s purpose of strengthening teeth! Kids should spit after brushing. That’s enough to get out the excess fluoride. They should have no more than a pea-sized amount of toothpaste on their brush to begin with. If your child consistently spits after brushing, their teeth will benefit and they’ll be at no risk for fluoride toxicity.

Visit your child’s dentist to debunk more dental myths.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

Mar
30

Learn to Love Your Smile!

You’ve caught yourself so many times saying this: “No photos, please! I hate my smile!”

Or maybe you’re the kind who suffers in silence, hiding your teeth behind a closed-lip smirk.

Almost everyone wishes that they could change something about their smile. But very few realize just how easy it is. A little cosmetic dental treatment can go a long way in revolutionizing the way you feel about yourself.

What Would You Change?

The first step in achieving a more beautiful smile is to identify what about it bothers you.

Common complaints include:

  • Long teeth
  • Crooked teeth
  • Discoloration or stain
  • Bad breath
  • Short teeth
  • Unevenly shaped teeth

Create a list of everything you’d like to see changed. Don’t hold back thinking that it’ll cost too much to repair it all. Just get it in writing. Next, rearrange your list so that it reflects your priorities.

Get Out What You Put In

Your smile represents an investment of time and effort. You don’t get beautiful teeth with dental work, alone. A solid routine of regular brushing and flossing will help keep your smile clean and fresh. That’s something to be proud of!

Diet also plays a major role. When you make balanced food choices, your smile will be healthier.

Consult an Expert

Now it’s time to bring your plans to life.

Your dentist is your best resource. You’ll get recommendations for improving oral hygiene, avoiding tooth damage, and making some upgrades.

Cosmetic dental treatments are more affordable than you may realize. A simple procedure like getting a crown can address multiple concerns at once.

Talk with your dentist to find out more about getting a smile you’ll fall in love with.

Posted on behalf of:
Les Belles NYC Dentistry
420 Lexington Ave #228
New York, NY 10170
212-804-8884

Mar
30

Can You Cap a Tooth Without Getting a Root Canal?

Posted in Root Canals

For many people, getting a dental cap goes, well, tooth-in-crown with getting root canal therapy/treatment (RCT).

It’s true that crowns and root canals often come together. But the connection isn’t what you may think. It’s not only possible but very common to get the cap without RCT.

What’s the Connection?

A root canal is a procedure where your dentist removes the damaged nerve from your tooth. This staves off infection and spares you a lot of pain. In place of the nerve, you get a special filling inside your tooth.

Drilling into a tooth for RCT can weaken it. A dental crown helps hold your tooth together and protect it from the forces of biting and chewing.

When to Get Just a Cap for Your Tooth

Crowns replace an outer layer of enamel and dentin of teeth. This makes them a good choice if you want to change the shape or color of a tooth. Crowns provide more complete coverage than fillings, so if you have a large cavity, capping your tooth may be an ideal solution.

Which Do You Need – Crown or RCT?

If your tooth’s nerve is compromised, then a root canal may be your only option.

Some signs you may need RCT include:

  • Pain
  • Extreme sensitivity to temperature
  • Sensitivity to bite pressure
  • Tooth color darkening

You could have something wrong with your tooth and never realize it. So don’t wait until it hurts to get it checked out! Regular dental visits will help you catch problems before they get out of hand.

Talk with your dentist to find out whether getting a crown now could help you avoid getting a root canal later.

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. David Kurtzman D.D.S.
611 Campbell Hill St. NW #101
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 980-6336

Mar
30

How Much Does it Cost to Get Dentures?

Posted in Dentures

For some folks, dentures are a costly investment.

If you are deciding whether or not to get false teeth, you’re understandably worried about the investment.

Take a minute to consider what dentures actually cost and then decide for yourself – are they really worth it to you?

What Factors In?

Dentures never come at a one-price-fits-all deal. They can range in cost from a few hundred dollars to nearly $8,000. The price varies depending on how detailed your dentures are, what they’re made from, where you get them from, and how much your insurance covers.

Besides the dentures themselves, you’re looking at expenses for:

  • Evaluations and x-rays
  • Manufacturing fees
  • Adjustments and relines
  • Surgery or extractions (if needed)

Clearly, it gets a little tricky to estimate the cost of dentures!

If you still have plenty of fully functioning teeth left, don’t be in a hurry to get them pulled. You could save a lot more money by just taking care of the teeth you have rather than exchanging them for dentures.

On the other hand, just deciding to go ahead with dentures could be the wiser route. That’s only if you would be throwing away cash to repair teeth with no hope of staying intact for long.

Are Dentures Right for You?

Bear in mind that the “cost” of dentures involves more than just the price tag.

Before making a decision, you’ll need to think about what you may sacrifice by getting (or not getting) dentures. Carefully weigh your priorities and get some help in determining the right choice for you.

Contact your dentist to get a full dental check-up as well as a treatment cost estimate for dentures or other options like implants.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Mar
30

Are Braces Making Your Gums Swell? What it Could Mean

Posted in Gum Disease

Gums are touchy and sensitive. They can even be a little moody. They don’t like sharing their space with anything.

When new braces come into town, gums can overreact by swelling beyond their normal size.

Some people’s gums are more sensitive than others. For the most part, however, you may be able to pin your swollen gums on a specific cause.

Put a Little More Work into Your Brushing!

Braces provide more surface area for plaque bacteria to collect on. These germs cause gum irritation (gingivitis), so getting braces increases your chances of angering your soft tissues.

This situation is easily remedied by taking your tooth-brushing game to the next level.

Your gums could benefit greatly from:

  • Extra brushing during the day
  • Brushing with a powered toothbrush
  • Using a water flosser
  • Rinsing with an antibacterial mouthwash

Hormones Turning Up the Volume on Gum Inflammation

In some instances, you aren’t entirely at fault for swollen gums. Sometimes it can be your hormones.

People usually get braces while in their teens. This is a time when hormones wreak havoc all over the body. It can be the same when you’re expecting; if you’re pregnant, you might see the same effects of how your situation starts to affect your gums.

Those picky gums respond in dramatic fashion to hormones with swelling and bleeding. Even so, this is still a good time to improve your oral hygiene.

Swollen gums can lead to serious gum disease later on, but they don’t have to, as long as you practice diligent oral hygiene. You can keep wearing your braces by doing your best to keep your teeth – and gums – clean. If swelling has you nervous about your braces, talk with your dentist or orthodontist.

Posted on behalf of:
Gwinnett Family Dental Care
3455 Lawrenceville Hwy
Lawrenceville, GA 30044
(770) 921-1115

Mar
30

Can Toothpaste Really Cure Acne Breakouts?

If you haven’t tried it, at least you’ve heard about it – dabbing toothpaste on that unwelcome blemish to shrink it ASAP.

But does this work?

This old trick for banishing pimples in a hurry is hard to prove effective. It seems to work for some people, but that could just be mere coincidence.

Why Toothpaste?

Almost any toothpaste will contain ingredients that can dry up pimples. Some of these include:

  • Peroxide
  • Alcohol
  • Essential oils
  • Triclosan
  • Baking soda

But these ingredients aren’t any more powerful than those found in formulations meant for acne. What’s even more important is to establish whether it’s safe to be using toothpaste on your skin.

Proceed with Caution

Some people can have a reaction to toothpaste if it’s left on the skin for too long. The stuff that’s in there is meant to dissolve slimy bacteria off of teeth and moist gums. It’s not exactly intended for use anywhere else on your face.

Worst case scenario, you could go from having a zit to having a big red peely patch on your face, if you treat it with toothpaste. Choose at your own risk.

If you want to try a DIY blemish treatment, you’re better off sticking with plain baking soda or hydrogen peroxide. Toothpaste contains far too many other specialized ingredients to get experimental with it!

Benefits of Toothpaste 

Keep your toothpaste out of your cosmetic bag and next to your toothbrush. Toothpaste contains surfactants which help it foam up and spread tooth-strengthening bacteria-fighting goodness all over your mouth.

Regular brushing and routine dental checkups will help you enjoy a gorgeous smile, no matter what breakouts come your way!

Ask your dentist which toothpaste is right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Greencastle Dental
195 Greencastle Road
Tyrone, GA 30290
(770) 486-5585

Mar
30

Does Nitrous Oxide Have Any Risks?

Better known as laughing gas, nitrous oxide has long been used in sedation dentistry to help patients relax and endure treatment. Laughing gas is considered safe for all, even for little kids, but does it carry any risks?

Quantity Matters

Folks used to believe nitrous oxide was as harmless as oxygen. We’ve since learned that there is such a thing as too much of a good thing.

Inhaling too much nitrous oxide can essentially block out oxygen. This is where the danger comes in – you can suffocate just by breathing in too much. It has to be mixed with pure oxygen to be used in dentistry.

What Nitrous Does

Laughing gas is given through a closed system of tubes with a continuous vacuum. The gas comes in through one tube where it’s inhaled and then the exhaled gas flows out the other pipe to a waste disposal.

No one can say for sure how nitrous depresses the central nervous system. All we know is that, similar to alcohol, nitrous slows down brain response. This dulls pain, lessens anxiety, and creates a sense of careless euphoria.

All this is well and good for the patient, but the clinician administering it has to pay careful attention.

The dentist or other trained medical professional carefully monitors the nitrogen-oxygen ratio. Once the patient starts feeling the effects of the gas, the flow is kept at that ratio. As soon as the anesthesia is no longer needed, the oxygen is increased to flush out the laughing gas.

The only risk to using laughing gas is using too much at one time. As long as a trained professional is administering and monitoring the gas flow, it’s perfectly safe. Ask your dentist for more information on anesthesia safety.

Posted on behalf of:
Green Dental of Alexandria
1725 Duke St
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 549-1725

Mar
30

How Does a Dental Implant Work?

Posted in Dental Implants

By design, dental implants are essentially an “artificial root” that is inserted into the jaw, where a missing tooth once stood. This titanium rod fuses with your bone and supports the desired fixed prosthesis (“false tooth.”)

Implants are able to support a variety of restorations, including fixed crowns and bridges. Alternatively, one or more implants can be used to secure a denture. While the implant stays put, the denture may be permanently affixed or removable. Implants themselves are not removable.

Phases of Implant Treatment

In a straightforward outpatient procedure, the dentist makes an incision in the gums and carefully inserts the implant in the bone underneath.

Next comes a healing period. The gums have to close over the implant to give it time to fuse (osseointegrate) with the bone. This usually takes 3-6 months to complete.

Once the metal implant takes to the bone, it’s strong enough to go to work. The dentist then removes the protective covering to place the restoration of choice. This is usually a crown that looks and feels like a natural tooth.

Dental implants don’t feel much different from real teeth. But if you get one, you’d still need to keep it clean in order to avoid getting an infection that could cause it to fail.

An Alternative Option to Replace Missing Teeth

Due to their predictability and longevity, implants offer a convenient advantage over traditional dentures and fixed bridges.

What are benefits to getting an implant?

  • Easy cleaning and care
  • Smiling and laughing with confidence
  • Cosmetic enhancement in addition to the medical benefits
  • No diet limitations

Contact your dentist today to learn more about implants and whether you’re a candidate for one.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….