Dental Tips Blog

Jun
9

3 Keys to Adjusting to Life with Dentures

Posted in Dentures

Your first set of dentures marks a turning point in your life. You’ve spent most of your years using natural teeth so the transition is a tough one, both physically and emotionally.

Here are a few things that will help make your adjustment as successful as possible:

Patience

There’s no denying the fact that the first time you try a denture it will feel strange or even uncomfortable.

Your prosthesis will probably feel way too big for your mouth. This will result in some drooling. But don’t give up! Follow your dentist’s instructions and give yourself time to adjust at your own pace.

Try to maintain a sense of humor and optimism as you get used to your denture. It will improve as the days go by.

Practice

It’s unrealistic to imagine eating out with friends at a fancy steakhouse the very day you get your dentures.

Push those plans out a month or so and let yourself practice chewing at home free from the public eye. You can start out with soft foods and slowly work up to chewier items.

Also, practice cutting up your food so that you know in advance how large or small the pieces should be. Remember, “practice makes perfect.”

Plenty Of (Denture) Paste

A well-fitting denture doesn’t need much help to stay in place. In fact, the better the fit, the better an adhesive product will work. Less is more, when it comes to denture pastes and creams.

Don’t be shy to use these products especially in the beginning. They’ll help you feel more confidence about wearing your new smile in public.

Discuss your concerns with your dentist before you receive your first denture.

Posted on behalf of:
Mundo Dentistry
3463 US-21 #101
Fort Mill, SC 29715
(704) 825-2018

Jun
9

Why Give Dental Sedation A Try?

Dental sedation is not as complicated as it may sound.

It’s simply when your dentist gives you either an oral or IV medication to help you relax during your treatment. Your dentist will review your medical history in advance and even consult your doctor to find out which kind of sedation is best for you.

Why should you look into “sleep dentistry?”

Sedation Can Speed Up The Longest Procedures

Some patients don’t have any dental phobias at all. Even so, they would prefer to doze their way through procedures that could take several hours. Sedation dentistry is common for things like:

  • Multiple tooth extractions
  • Root canals
  • Smile makeovers

It’s also not a bad idea to get a lot of little dental procedures done in one sitting. Sedation can help you comfortably sit through all that treatment just so you can get it over with in one day.

Anxiety Is Bad For Your System

If you struggle with anxiety every time you see that dental chair, your body could be suffering more than you realize. Stress floods your system with cortisol, a hormone that can affect blood sugar levels, belly fat, and your immune system.

Give your body a break by relaxing with the help of some sedative medication.

Kick Dental Fear To The Curb – For Good!

All it takes is one bad dental experience to scare you away from the dentist for good.

But one or two surprisingly pleasant appointments could be enough to restore your confidence in dentistry. Try some sedation for one or two procedures and see how much better you’ll feel.

Ask your local dentist about the sedation option that’s right for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Cosmetic Dentist of Hayward
27206 Calaroga Ave #216
Hayward, CA 94545
(510) 782-7821

Jun
9

What to Do When Braces Hurt Your Teeth

Posted in Braces

You try to tell yourself again and again that braces are worth the wait and worth the trouble.

Even still, the discomfort braces can cause could be enough to give you second thoughts.

Why Do Braces Hurt?

There are a few ways that orthodontia taxes your mouth:

  • Loose wires poking your gums
  • Brackets chafing against your cheeks
  • Aching teeth and gums after getting braces adjusted

The good news is that it’s only a matter of a few days for your mouth to adjust to the tension after getting an adjustment.

But it’s an entirely different nightmare if soft tissues in your mouth are suffering because of coming in contact with the irritating metal. There’s nothing that annoys you the way this does!

How To Cope

Avoid foods that you have to chew really well for the first few days after an adjustment. Your jaw and teeth don’t need any more tension put on them. Ice cream, soft fruit, mashed veggies, and macaroni and cheese are perfect for times like this.

If your doctor okays it, take some ibuprofen or another painkiller to take the edge off your discomfort.

Ice packs are another great way to numb up sore gums and bone. Try applying a cold compress to the side of your face for about 5-10 minutes at a time. There are even some “freezable” dental products you can use to relieve your gums.

Pack some ortho wax around bothersome metal piece to cushion the soft tissues.

If your mouth sores are really bad, swish with warm salt water to keep them clean and bring down inflammation. Next, coat them in a a topical oral painkiller.

Need more ideas to get relief? Talk with your dentist or orthodontist for tips.

Posted on behalf of:
Walton Orthodontics
2609 Peachtree Pkwy #C
Suwanee, GA 30024
(770) 663-0955

Jun
9

What Is a Bite Adjustment?

Posted in TMJ Therpy

A bite adjustment is what it sounds: your dentist will make changes to the way teeth fit together as you bite.

The adjustment could be very small, such as filing away excess enamel. Or it might be part of a much bigger project to stabilize your bite with multiple crowns.

Why Get An Adjustment?

Your teeth are supposed to contact each other just so. If they’re off by even a little bit, you could experience some discomfort. Your smile might also suffer permanent damage that you’re not even aware of.

A bite adjustment is not the same as getting braces. It’s very possible (and common) for teeth with great alignment to not make contact at the right points. In fact, it’s not unusual to need just such an adjustment after braces come off.

What could cause your bite to be off:

  • Damaged or improper restorations
  • Teeth out of alignment
  • Missing teeth
  • Jaw size
  • Jaw positioning
  • Tooth shape and size

How Do You Know If You Need A Bite Adjustment?

You won’t necessarily be in pain. Most folks aren’t aware they need an adjustment until their dentist mentions it. After it’s fixed, they notice the difference.

Your dentist will help you spot signs such as loose, worn, or chipped teeth, gum recession, sensitivity, and TMJ issues.

He or she will probably have you bite down on a piece of colored dental paper that leaves marks on chewing surfaces. This shows if some teeth have more surface area contact than others.

X-rays, models, and other scans, will help your dentist assemble a plan of what needs correcting.

Think your bite is off? Call your dentist today for instructions.

Posted on behalf of:
Avalon Dental Group P.C.
2205 Williams Trace Blvd #108
Sugar Land, TX 77478
(281) 240-5559

Jun
9

What Are Your Gums Trying to Tell You?

Posted in Gum Disease

Your eyes may be the window to the soul, but the mouth is the gateway to your body.

Did you know that there is a strong connection between your gum health and your overall health? Problems that start with the gums can quickly affect other body systems, and conditions not involving the gums can make their presence known via your mouth.

Here are a few things your gums reveal about dental health, overall health, and your oral hygiene:

Gum Recession

Recession could signal multiple problems:

  • Gum disease
  • Teeth clenching habit
  • Poor tooth alignment
  • Improper tooth brushing technique

Puffy Gums

If your gums look puffed or rolled, they’re probably irritated by excessive plaque buildup. But if they look drastically overgrown, this could be triggered by medication or some other underlying problem. Definitely get this one checked out by a dentist ASAP.

Bleeding Gums

This is typically a hallmark sign of insufficient flossing. However, gums will also bleed a lot easier because of hormone, medication, or immune system influences. Discuss these possibilities with your dentist if extra flossing doesn’t help.

Pimple On The Gums

An odd pimple on the gums near a tooth could be a dental abscess. When tooth nerves die, the infection escapes via the tooth root and out through the gums. Do not wait if you see a strange new growth! Get it looked at immediately.

Bad Breath

Chronic bad breath may not just mean that you eat a lot of garlic. It could be an indicator of gum disease, a digestive problem, or a breathing issue.

Pay attention to your gums! Regular dental visits are the best way to stay on top of your gum health and be alert to dangerous changes.

Posted on behalf of:
Pristine Dental
555 Providence Hwy #2
Walpole, MA 02081
(508) 734-7056

Jun
9

Struggling to Get a Good Night’s Rest? Your Dentist Can Help!

Posted in Sleep Apnea

In view of all the demands we face in daily life, it’s not surprising that most Americans are under a lot of stress.

This tension unfortunately tends to manifest itself during the one time we can relax and unwind: bedtime.

A couple of common sleep disorders include sleep apnea and bruxism. 

Suffer From Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is when your brain doesn’t get enough oxygen while you’re sleeping. It usually happens because soft tissues in the throat relax and close off the airways.

Lack of oxygen triggers another wave of stress in the body that quite often results in bruxism.

What Is Bruxism?

Also known as teeth grinding, this habit usually happens when you’re unconscious in sleep.

Whether you are under stress or your body is panicking over the lack of air, you may start clenching and grinding your teeth when you sleep. This is damaging to teeth and can cause problems with your TMJ.

How Your Dentist Helps

By taking a look at your mouth and asking some questions, your dentist might be able to help you figure out whether you have a sleep disorder.

He or she will let you know if your throat anatomy could contribute to sleep apnea. Signs that you’re clenching your teeth out of stress might include gum recession, worn enamel, and jaw issues.

What’s more, many offices can design a customized mouthguard that can protect your teeth from grinding forces. Others act as splints that support your jaw so that it can’t slide back and block your airway.

What sleep solutions can your dental office provide? Call today to find out.

Posted on behalf of:
Hudson Oaks Family Dentistry
200 S Oakridge Dr #106
Hudson Oaks, TX 76087
(817) 857-6790

Jun
9

4 Signs You Could Be Brushing Incorrectly

Yes, the way you brush does matter! This isn’t just one of your dental hygienist’s pet-peeves. It’s something that has a big impact on your smile.

Here are four of the most common signs that something about your brushing technique just isn’t working for you.

  1. Abrasion to Your Teeth

Signs of horizontal wear on the tooth enamel usually indicate that someone has a heavy hand while brushing. Stiff scrub-brushing will erode enamel with time.

  1. Gum Recession

It’s not just your teeth that can suffer from aggressive brushing. Gums will probably respond sooner to the irritation by receding away from the teeth.

  1. Plaque and Tartar Buildup

Are you sick of that constant tartar growth on your lower front teeth?

Brushing there a little longer each day with the toothbrush properly angled could help you slow down the development of that unsightly, odorous buildup.

  1. Splayed Toothbrush Bristles

It’s normal for the bristles on a brush to wear down over time. They get bent and splayed and that usually means it’s time for a fresh toothbrush.

But if your brush bristles are splayed within just a couple of weeks, then that’s another sign that you’re brushing way too hard. You should be getting more mileage out of your brush than that!

What Can You Do?

Try out different kinds of toothbrushes. A powered toothbrush could even help ensure that you’re brushing with the right amount of pressure for the right amount of time.

Practice brushing during your dental checkup and cleaning. At your next dental visit, show your hygienist how you are brushing and you’ll get some valuable feedback.

Posted on behalf of:
Avalon Dental Group P.C.
2205 Williams Trace Blvd #108
Sugar Land, TX 77478
(281) 240-5559

Jun
9

Is It Safe for Kids to Whiten Their Teeth?

Posted in Teeth Whitening

If you want the short answer, it’s this: no, it’s not recommended for kids to whiten their teeth. To understand why, or when it is ok for a child to whiten, this is what you need to know:

Questionable Teeth Bleaching Safety

Probably the main reason your dentist discourages whitening baby teeth is simply because we don’t yet know how teeth whitening affects developing teeth.

Additionally, teeth whitening products use strong chemicals that reach deep into enamel pores. If you overdo it, teeth can become very sensitive. Further, these chemicals can quickly cause painful gum irritation to growing tooth nerves.

Most kids go by the logic that the more you whiten, the better the results. They just aren’t ready to responsibly use the products as directed.

Why Do Kids’ Teeth Look Yellow?

Do you know the real reason your child needs teeth whitening?

Newly erupted adult teeth tend to look very dark in comparison with pearly white baby tooth neighbors. Baby teeth have less of the dentin layer than adult teeth. It’s this layer that gives teeth a yellow color.

Your child may not need whitening, at all. Their teeth just look dark as they first come in.

What You Can Do

Don’t pressure your child into having a celebrity-caliber smile. When your son or daughter grows into a responsible young teen, they may be interested in selecting whitening treatments that appeal to them.

The next consideration is your child’s oral hygiene. Kids who don’t brush well can grow stain and plaque in a whole spectrum of colors.

A trip to the dentist for a professional cleaning could do wonders. While you’re there, ask about the right time for your child to start whitening their teeth.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

Jun
9

5 Ways to Protect Your New Smile

At long last, your smile makeover is complete, and boy, do you look good!

Next on your list of priorities is making this gorgeous investment last a long time. How can you do so? Keep the following five tips in mind as you go about your daily routine.

  1. Avoid Staining Foods

Most of your new restorations should do well with resisting stain. But your natural teeth will be just as prone to stain as ever before.

If your teeth darken because of exposure to staining foods and drinks, they’ll stand out in contrast with all your shiny white restorations.

You may need to whiten your teeth on occasion to keep them bright. Limit how often you eat things like:

  • Coffee
  • Red wine
  • Curry
  • Soda and sports drinks
  1. Wear Mouthguards For Sleep and Sports

One of the deadliest things to a new smile is trauma. Grinding your teeth in your sleep or taking a blow to the mouth during a sports game are quick ways to undo all that beautiful dental work.

  1. Wear Your Retainer

If your smile makeover included orthodontic treatment, make sure you wear your retainer as directed. This ensures that you won’t need to repeat any expensive tooth realignments.

  1. Practice Great Oral Hygiene

Keep your gums plaque-free to ward off inflammation and avoid getting any more cavities! Daily flossing is a must.

  1. Keep Your Dental Appointments

Now that your smile is “fixed,” it’s easy to forget that it won’t stay that way on its own.

Regular dental checkups and cleanings will ensure your smile makeover is still holding strong. Your dentist will alert you to potential problems so that you can fix them while they’re still small.

Posted on behalf of:
Smiles by Seese
610 Jetton St #250
Davidson, NC 28036
(704) 895-5095

Jun
9

Can You Get a Cavity After A Root Canal?

Posted in Root Canals

A root canal is when your dentist takes out the nerve of a tooth and replaces it with a filling material. Doing this can either relieve an infection or prevent one from happening.

After your root canal, your tooth shouldn’t have any more sensation. It’s protected by a strong crown, and will continue to work like any other tooth.

Your tooth with the root canal also has the same risk of getting a cavity, just like any other tooth. Why? Because bacteria can leak in at the margin where the crown meets the tooth. But does it really matter now that it no longer has a nerve?

Cavity After A Root Canal – Why Dangerous?

You know how cavities can get really sensitive? Because a tooth with a root canal is no longer alive, you probably won’t feel anything if that tooth gets a cavity.

If you don’t feel the decay and can’t see it because it’s under the crown, it can continue until your tooth is too damaged to even support a crown.

You got the root canal to preserve your natural tooth, but once decay takes over, you may have to get it pulled, anyway.

Protect Your Root Canal

Have you recently had a root canal? Congratulations on getting that out of the way!

But don’t forget that your work is far from over.

Make sure you brush and floss each tooth daily, even the ones with root canals. Visit your dentist regularly for x-rays and exams so that you can keep a close eye on how that root canal is holding up.

Posted on behalf of:
Dream Dentist
1646 W U.S. 50
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 726-2699

Most Popular

Tori, Exostosis, and Extra Bone Formation in the Mouth

A fairly common occurrence in the mouth is the existence of extra bone development along the outside or inside of the jawline near the teeth, or in the roof of…

Lingual Frenectomy versus Lingual Frenuloplasty

Lingual frenectomy and lingual frenuloplasty are both dental procedures used to correct a condition called ankyloglossia. Ankylogloassia, more commonly known as ‘tied tongue’, is an abnormality of the lingual frenulum….

Difference Between Conscious and Unconscious Sedation

Sedation dentistry is a wonderful option for many people who would not or cannot tolerate dentistry in a traditional dental setting.   Many people have a fear of visiting the dentist,…