Dental Tips Blog

Apr
9

How Long Does it Take to Get a Dental Implant?

Posted in Dental Implants

No one can say exactly how long it’ll take for you to get an implant, since the process is unique to each individual.

There are a few different factors that will affect your overall treatment process.

Implant Treatment Planning

Simply discussing and planning for dental implants takes time. You’ll need a set of x-rays, scans, and photos. Your dentist or implant surgeon needs to be sure your mouth is ready and healthy enough to support implants.

All the surgical planning is necessary to ensure that the implant goes in at the optimum depth and angle.

Bone Grafting

Some patients don’t have enough bone to support an implant. If that’s true of you, then you may need a few more months after minor surgery to graft in new bone and make sure it heals before something permanent can be installed.

Healing Time

Your implant will need time to heal and bond with the bone before you can start putting weight on it by chewing. For some people, this process takes only a couple months. Others need much more time.

How long it takes you to heal depends on a few factors:

  • The health of the bone and gums in your mouth
  • How quickly and well you heal
  • Your immune system
  • Whether or not you smoke (smoking slows down the healing process)
  • How well you keep your implant site clean and follow the dentist’s post-op instructions

After the surgical site heals, your dentist will make a small opening in your gums to reveal the top of the implant. You may need more time to heal up from this procedure before attaching a crown or bridge.

Ask your dentist about a dental implant consultation for an individualized timeline.

Posted on behalf of:
Elegant Smiles
1955 Cliff Valley Way NE #100
Brookhaven, GA 30329
404-634-4224

Apr
9

Here’s How Your Child Could Benefit from Dental Sedation

Dental sedation is a safe process when a well-trained professional team treats your child. Here are some of the ways sedation could make the next dental experience a better one for your child.

Sedation Keeps Your Child Safe

One of the main reasons kids often need sedation at the dental office is to keep them safe. Anxious or fussy children, especially young ones, may thrash around or try to leave the chair while there are tools running, putting them at risk for serious injury.

Dental sedation helps kids relax and stay still, so that the dentist can safely complete their necessary treatment.

Sedation Allows for Efficient Care

Children usually can’t sit through lengthy treatment without getting anxious or upset. If they essentially doze through it, however, they won’t even be aware of how much time has gone by. This is especially helpful when it comes to long complex dental procedures.

As a bonus, when a child is sedated, a dentist can get a lot more done in a single sitting. That means fewer dental appointments for you to schedule.

Sedation Keeps Your Child Comfortable

You hate the thought of your little one suffering any kind of discomfort. Sedation works along with local numbing injections to keep your child as comfortable as possible.

Sedation Helps Your Child Form Positive Memories

When your child has no memories of scary dental treatment, then he or she won’t have any reason to fear the dentist. They’ll be much more cooperative at future visits and possibly look forward to their upcoming appointments.

Ask your child’s dentist for more information on safe dental sedation.

Posted on behalf of:
Dunwoody Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
1816 Independence Square, Suite B
Dunwoody, GA 30338
(770) 399-9199

Apr
9

5 Ways to Get a Celebrity-Caliber Smile

Posted in Dental Implants

Want your smile to look like it’s fresh off the red carpet?

That perfect set of celebrity teeth is right within your reach. Try one or more of the following cosmetic dental treatments to help you feel better about showing off your unique smile.

  1. Whiten Your Teeth

A little teeth bleaching goes a long way. To make sure the job gets done right the first time, see a dentist for a professional teeth whitening treatment.

Bleaching takes years off your smile. It removes food stains and lightens teeth from the inside. A one-time hour long treatment could be all you need to get the smile of your dreams.

  1. Get Some Dental Bonding

Are you annoyed by that one chipped tooth? Dental bonding smooths out enamel irregularities in a fast and cost-effective appointment.

  1. Try Invisalign

Straight teeth characterize that Hollywood look, but few people are actually born with teeth that are naturally in a straight line. Many celebrities straighten their smiles with barely-there orthodontic methods like Invisalign. Happily, their secret to a glam smile is now yours!

  1. Put on a Veneer or Two

Do you have teeth that refuse to whiten? Don’t have time for braces? Veneers may be your solution.

Dental veneers completely mask imperfections on front teeth and create a perfectly uniform look for your smile.

  1. Get Dental Implants

If you’re missing any teeth, it’s time to think beyond removable partial dentures. Get a natural and more youthful look by filling in the gap with a dental implant or two.

Which celebrity-style cosmetic dental treatment is right for you? Find out by scheduling a smile consultation with your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Center At Kennestone
129 Marble Mill Rd NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 424-4565

Apr
9

5 Questions to Ask Your Dentist Before Getting a Denture

Posted in Dentures

Getting a denture isn’t the same process for everyone. It’s helpful if you understand your own unique needs and circumstances before getting a set of “false teeth.” Here are five important questions to discuss with your dentist to make sure you understand the recommended treatment.

  1. How will dentures change the way I eat and talk?

Getting dentures is a big commitment since there’s no going back to your natural teeth once they’re gone. It’s crucial that you understand how a prosthesis will change your life before you commit to one.

  1. Should I keep any of my remaining natural teeth?

You may be anxious to get rid of your remaining natural teeth, especially if you keep getting cavities or having other problems. But as long as they’re still strong, you may be better off holding onto them and getting a partial denture.

  1. What kind of denture is right for me?

There are many different kinds of dental prostheses. Your dentist will help you find out which materials and design are right for your smile.

  1. Are there any alternatives to getting a denture?

A denture may not even be the solution you need. Ask your dentist about partial dentures, bridges, implants and other options for restoring your bite.

  1. How can I keep my dentures in good shape?

Getting a denture is only the start of your new responsibility. Keeping your denture in shape and your mouth in good health requires some work on your part. Your dentist will explain what you should do to get the most out of your denture.

Visit a dentist in your area to ask any other questions you have.

Posted on behalf of:
Georgia Denture and Implant Specialists
203 Woodpark Pl #102
Woodstock, GA 30188
(770) 926-0021

Apr
9

5 Healthy Foods That Are Actually Bad for Your Teeth

You know that soda and sugary treats are bad for your smile. But you might be surprised to learn that even some healthy foods can be harmful to your dental health.

  1. Oranges

Loaded with vitamin C and water, oranges are the perfect defense against the common cold. On the downside, all that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is harsh on tooth enamel. Try to sip your orange juice through a straw to minimize contact with your teeth.

  1. Popcorn

Popcorn is a very versatile snack – light, yet satisfying and a good source of fiber. But it can be bad for your teeth if your popcorn is coated with caramel. Even if you opt for no toppings, those popcorn hulls can get wedged in your gums and cause inflammation.

Crunching on half-popped kernels is very damaging to teeth and can cause a cracked or chipped tooth.

  1. Raspberries

Some research suggests that raspberries can help regulate mood swings. But the little seeds in these healthful berries can be painful when they get stuck between teeth or wedged in a molar.

  1. Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are a great source of antioxidants, calcium, fiber, and omega-3 fatty acids. But to keep those pesky seeds from getting lodged in your teeth, try enjoying this dietary supplement ground up into a gelatin-like powder.

  1. Dried Fruit

Dried fruit is a convenient way to get your daily fiber and vitamins. Chew with caution, however, since sticky dried fruit is also high in sugar and can get stuck in your teeth, increasing your risk for cavities.

Is your diet smile-friendly? Find out by scheduling a checkup at your local dental office.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Apr
9

Does It Hurt to Get a Filling?

Posted in Fillings

When you hear “dental filling” you might think “pain.” But that’s only because you need a filling to repair a cavity, which is painful.

Cavities are often painful because they are holes that expose the tooth’s nerve to uncomfortable elements in the mouth. That nerve is very sensitive to sweets, hot and cold temperatures, and acids. Decay removes some of your tooth’s protective layers and jeopardizes the nerve.

Getting a dental filling is what will help your tooth to feel better. It patches up the hole, to restore the insulation around your tooth’s nerve.

But does it hurt to have decay removed and filled?

Why Fillings Don’t Hurt

You will be numb for the entire filling process. Your dentist will give you an injection of anesthesia that dulls your tooth to pain. While the physical removal happens, you won’t feel more than a little pressure.

Cavity preparation removes only the rotten part of your tooth to keep the hollowed-out hole as small as possible.

The dentist then puts in the filling to seal off the opening left behind. Your patched-up tooth will be ready for action almost immediately after your appointment.

After the Filling

Even after your numbing injection wears off, you shouldn’t feel any pain. The only potentially painful part is the fact that your tooth nerve was exposed to food and air temperatures. The filling plugs up the opening and fixes that problem.

Some people experience a little sensitivity soon after getting a new filling, but their teeth quickly adjust.

It is very unusual to experience discomfort after getting a tooth filled. If you do, contact your dentist to have your restoration checked.

Posted on behalf of:
Buford Family Dental
4700 Nelson Grogdon Blvd. NE #210
Buford, GA 30518
678.730.2005

Apr
9

Gum Disease: A Silent Killer?

Posted in Gum Disease

Gum disease (periodontitis) is a serious condition affecting an estimated 85% of adults in the United States. The problem, however, is that most of those with gum disease don’t even realize they have it, making periodontitis a silent attacker.

How Gum Disease Destroys Your Smile

Periodontitis doesn’t strike overnight. Rather, it creeps up over the course of a few months.

Gum disease starts out as mild inflammation known as gingivitis. This infection is reversible but if you don’t treat it in time, the swelling can spread from the gums into the bone. The inflammation then causes the bone to disintegrate. As the jawbone shrinks, gums recede and teeth loosen.

The Connection Between Gum Disease and Heart Disease

Periodontitis is connected to other medical complications such as heart disease and stroke. The swelling in the gums triggers inflammation in blood vessels elsewhere.

Bacteria responsible for gum infections have also been found in some cases of pneumonia. This suggests that periodontitis can also cause serious respiratory infections.

Untreated gum disease can increase your risk for life-threatening conditions.

Gum Disease Linked to Premature Births

There’s a link between pregnant women with gum disease and premature births. That’s why it’s so important for women to pay attention to their oral health before and during pregnancy. Babies’ health depends on their mothers having a healthy body (and gums.)

Prevent the Silent Killer

The good news is that gum disease is avoidable. You can keep your gums healthy by:

  • Brushing and flossing every day
  • Getting lots of vitamin C in your diet
  • Not smoking
  • Visiting your dentist for regular gum and dental checkups

Contact your dentist to learn more about maintaining healthy gums and preventing periodontitis.

Posted on behalf of:
Bayshore Dental Center
810 W Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd #2900
Seffner, FL 33584
(813) 330-2006

Mar
13

Why Your Gum Health Matters

Posted in Gum Disease

Your gums might seem to be the least important part of your smile. You probably never even pay attention to them until you get a popcorn kernel stuck between your teeth and need to floss, and then your gums bleed a little.

Why should you be concerned about your gum health?

Here are four important reasons.

Gum Health Is Connected to Heart Health

Gum disease is an inflammatory condition. The bacteria and inflammatory response associated with gum disease are also linked to problems such as stroke and heart health. Keeping your gums healthy can lower your risk for cardiovascular problems.

Healthy Gums Equal Healthy Lungs

Studies show that people with gum disease tend to be at higher risk for pneumonia. Healthy gums can even improve conditions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Gum Health Affects Self-Image

You don’t always appreciate a good thing until it’s gone, they say, and that’s very true when it comes to your gums.

Receded gumlines can leave you with long yellow teeth that you may be ashamed to show off in a smile. Unhealthy gums can also lead to embarrassing tooth loss.

Healthy Gums Mean Good Nutrition

Having healthy gums is one sign that you’re getting plenty of vitamins in your diet. But healthy gums also do you a big favor by holding your teeth in place. As long as you have strong teeth to chew with, you can enjoy a varied and nutritious diet.

If you lose teeth to gum disease on the other hand, you may find it difficult to eat the fresh fruits and vegetables and chewy whole grains your body needs.

How are your gums doing? Find out by scheduling a checkup at your local dental office.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverwood Dental
3350 Riverwood Pkwy #2120
Atlanta GA 30339
(770) 955-2505

Mar
13

Why Do You Need a Crown After Getting a Root Canal?

Posted in Root Canals

Why is getting a dental crown after a root canal so important? Can the tooth just go without?

Root Canals Restore…but Also Weaken Teeth

A root canal involves removing an infected or damaged tooth, to eliminate all traces of the compromised nerves.

Unfortunately, the process can knock out a lot of material from inside the tooth. You’ll be left with a hollow structure that’s more fragile.

Live teeth strengthen themselves with the nutrients brought in by the blood vessels flowing from the roots to the pulp. When a tooth has a root canal, it dies and can no longer be reinforced from the inside.

If you need a root canal, it’s because your tooth is already dead or in the process of dying. The treatment is just a way to save what’s left, so that you don’t have to extract the tooth entirely.

Capping your tooth with a dental crown keeps it strong and protected even after being weakened by a necessary treatment.

Is It Possible to Get a Root Canal without a Crown?

Some teeth do fine without a crown after having a root canal. These can include:

  • Front teeth like incisors and canines which don’t experience much chewing force
  • Strong teeth that have no history of previous damage
  • Teeth with very little damage from the root canal

In such cases, a dental filling may be sufficient to seal off the tooth and keep it in good shape for years to come.

Only your  dentist can tell after a root canal whether your tooth is strong enough to go without a crown so, check in with him or her to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
ConfiDenT
11550 Webb Bridge Way, Suite 1
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 772-0994

Mar
13

Why Some People Need “Bone Grafting”

Posted in Oral Surgery

Bone grafting in dentistry is when an oral surgeon builds up weak areas in a person’s jaw with bone tissue or a similar substitute. The bone may be taken from your own body (autograft) or from a donor (allograft).

Grafting isn’t just for the jaw; it can also repair defects on the upper half of the mouth, too.

Why do some people end up needing a bone graft at all?

After an Injury

Cancer or an accident can lead to someone losing a large portion of bone in their jaw. A bone graft is thus necessary to restore normal function or anatomy.

To Protect Teeth

Severe gum recession or disease can lead to teeth losing vital support and protection. The exposed tooth roots are at risk for decay and extreme sensitivity, or they can fall out altogether.

Someone with compromised teeth may need to have some bone tissue replaced if they want to save their natural smile.

Prepare for a Dental Implant

Perhaps one of the most common reasons for bone grafting is to prepare a site in the mouth to receive dental implants.

Some spots in the dental arch can become too low or thin to support an implant. Natural existing bone can wear down with time if teeth are missing or if it’s actively attacked by gum disease.

Whatever the reason for getting a jaw bone graft, it takes time to heal after the procedure. It can be several months before a site is ready to support a denture or withstand an implant procedure.

Wondering whether a bone graft is right for you? Talk to a local dentist or oral surgeon.

Posted on behalf of:
Manhattan Dental Design
315 W 57th St Suite 206
New York, NY 10019
(646) 504-4377

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