Dental Tips Blog

Oct
20

Make Your Dental Fillings Last as Long as Possible!

Posted in Fillings

Making your dental restorations last isn’t difficult; they need the same care and attention that your natural teeth do.

Practice Excellent Oral Hygiene

Dental restorations tend to fall out prematurely due to decay. So brushing and flossing will prevent new cavities from forming around or under your fillings. The key is to be thorough. Floss every day and brush for at least two minutes twice a day.

Watch Your Diet

Acidic foods wear away tooth enamel. If your diet is high in acids, the enamel around your fillings can erode and make them pop out.

Sugar is another threat to fillings. Sugar fuels cavity-causing bacteria. Foods high in sugar, especially liquid or sticky carbohydrates, will feed the germs that can trigger cavity development under your existing restorations.

Wear a Mouthguard

An athletic mouthguard worn during sport activities will protect your crowns, implants, bridges, and fillings from damage should your mouth suffer an impact. A custom guard worn at night can spare your fillings the premature wear of a teeth-grinding habit.

Use Fluoride

Fluoride is a mineral that remineralizes tooth enamel by replacing inferior minerals in the structure. The result is tooth enamel that’s immune to decay. Your teeth need extra fluoride in areas that are weak or prone to cavity development such as the edges of fillings.

You can get fluoride in toothpaste and over-the-counter rinses. Your dentist can also provide you with prescription-grade fluoride formulations to give your fillings a solid grip on the teeth.

Remember, too, to visit your dentist at least twice a year for dental checkups. Exams and the occasional x-ray will ensure that your dental fillings have many years left in them.

Posted on behalf of:
Sapphire Creek Dental
2180 State Hwy 46 W, Suite 106
New Braunfels, TX 78132
(830) 549-2014

Oct
20

Temporary Dental Crown Aftercare: What You Need to Know

Posted in Crowns

You’re still numb from the anesthetic. Your dentist has prepped your tooth down to fit under a new restoration. It’s been capped with a plastic or metal temporary crown.

What’s the next step? Here’s what you need to know.

Take Medications as Directed

Your dentist will give you instructions on taking medications for reducing pain or preventing infection. Follow those carefully to avoid complications.

Chew Carefully

Avoid chewing on your temporary crown for at least an hour after getting it put on. It’s safest to just chew on the opposite side of your mouth for now.

Floss with Caution

Flossing should be an important part of your daily routine, but you’ll want to give that tooth with the temporary crown a break. If the floss catches under the edge, it can pop the cap right off.

Use Desensitizing Toothpaste

Gently brush around your capped tooth with a desensitizing toothpaste. This formulation has minerals that will insulate your vulnerable tooth that’s just been covered by a temporary crown.

Call the Dentist if the Temporary Crown Comes Off

The temporary crown is there for a reason! If it comes off any sooner than the day you’re scheduled to get a permanent cap, then you’ll need to have it recemented.

Keep Your Dental Appointments!

Your tooth may have a pretty new cap, but the temporary crown is just that: temporary. It’s just a placeholder while you wait for the permanent crown to be finished up. You can’t leave it there and expect it to last indefinitely. It’s highly prone to leaking and popping off.

Rather than take your chances, see your dentist for the next appointment in the week or two after you get the temporary crown.

Posted on behalf of:
ConfiDenT
11550 Webb Bridge Way, Suite 1
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 772-0994

Oct
20

How Long Do You Have to Wait to Get Dentures After Getting Your Teeth Pulled?

Posted in Dentures

Transitioning from natural teeth to dentures isn’t easy. Adding to your anxiety, you’re wondering how long you’ll be without teeth until you can start wearing your finished denture.

Is it possible to get dentures immediately after your teeth are extracted? Well, the answer can be yes and no depending on your situation.

Healing Period for Dentures

Your mouth will be sore and your gums will be swollen after getting teeth extracted. Healing usually takes around six to eight weeks.

It’s best to get a permanent denture fitted once your mouth is completely healed from the extractions. But most people can’t afford to be without teeth for the weeks or months it takes to heal from multiple tooth extractions. That’s why dentists also offer immediate dentures.

What Are Immediate Dentures?

Your dentist designs an immediate denture based upon measurements of your mouth taken before the extractions. Then, after your teeth are taken out, you’ll be given the immediate denture to wear.

An immediate denture should be worn 24/7 to keep the swelling under control. If you take it off during the initial healing period, you may not be able to fit it back over your gums.

Immediate dentures loosen as the gums heal and shrink to their normal positions. These dentures need to be adjusted multiple times over the healing period to accommodate your mouth. Once healing is complete, you may need to be fitted for an entirely new denture.

You may not qualify for an immediate denture, however, if you have complications or a lingering gum infection after the extractions.

Contact your dentist to find out whether an immediate or traditional denture is best for you.

Posted on behalf of:
Riverwood Dental
3350 Riverwood Pkwy #2120
Atlanta GA 30339
(770) 955-2505

Oct
20

Do Dental Veneers Ruin Your Teeth?

Posted in Veneers

There is a misconception that dental veneers are bad for your teeth. The truth is simply that veneers are safe and healthy as long as you do your part to take good care of them.

What Are Dental Veneers?

Veneers are thin shells that are usually made from porcelain. They go over the front of upper anterior teeth to create a facade of an uniformly-shaped and evenly-spaced white smile.

But simply placing traditional veneers over existing tooth enamel can make teeth look and feel bulky. Getting veneers necessitates the removal of a thin layer of enamel on the front of the teeth.

You don’t lose much enamel; just enough to match the thickness of the veneer. Losing any amount of tooth enamel, however, could make your tooth vulnerable to damage. You can never again be without veneers once your teeth are prepared for them. If your veneers come off, they must be replaced.

In this sense, veneers are permanent. But as long as they’re properly cared for, they aren’t harmful to teeth.

Limitations of Veneers

Veneers don’t enhance tooth structure. They are purely cosmetic. If you have teeth that are weakened by fracture or decay, then a veneer is not the answer. Your dentist will recommend a crown or filling for teeth where a veneer is insufficient.

Do You Qualify for a Veneer?

Dentists typically place porcelain veneers on healthy adult teeth in people who are responsible enough to take good care of them. With regular brushing and flossing, a veneer can last for many years without causing any harm to a tooth.

Schedule a dental veneer consultation with your dentist to find out whether veneers are right for your smile.

Posted on behalf of:
Laguna West Dental Care
9098 Laguna Main St Ste 8
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 683-7300

Oct
20

Catch Oral Cancer Early!

Posted in Oral Cancer

Oral cancer is one of those deadly diseases that catches most of its victims entirely off-guard.

Individuals affected by oral cancer don’t realize they have it until it’s too late. Oral cancer can cause difficulty speaking, breathing, eating, or swallowing. But by the time these symptoms show up, the cancer is usually beyond the point of responding to treatment.

Ironically, oral cancer is usually very easy to treat . . . as long as it’s caught early enough.

How can you find out your oral cancer risk before it’s too late?

The first thing to do is visit your dentist.

Oral Cancer Screenings at the Dentist

Routine dental checkups typically include a thorough oral cancer screening. Your dentist will examine your tongue, gums, lips, cheeks, and throat for unusual patches, wounds, discoloration, or scars. Even normal-looking lesions will be noted and tracked for changes down the road.

Biopsies by the Oral Surgeon

Oral surgeons are dental specialists trained to perform surgery on the gums and bone in your mouth and other tissues in and around it.

When it comes to removing tumors and suspicious growths or simply taking a biopsy, an oral surgeon is the one to visit. Your dentist can refer you out to an experienced surgeon in the area if you have a questionable spot in your mouth.

Lower Your Risk for Oral Cancer

Visit your dentist to learn what you can do to reduce your individual risk for oral cancer. This may involve cutting back on alcohol consumption and/or quitting tobacco use. Good oral hygiene and regular visits to your dentist will also help you keep your mouth healthy and comfortable for years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
Smile Design Studios
6130 Highway 6
Missouri City, TX 77459
(281) 969-7388

Oct
20

What to Expect When You Get a Dental Filling

Posted in Fillings

Does dental treatment make you a little nervous? Here’s what you can expect the next time you’re scheduled to get a tooth filled.

Anesthesia to Keep You Comfortable

To prepare your tooth for treatment, the dentist will make sure it’s fully numb. He or she will probably start by putting a little numbing jelly on your gums. This will help you not feel the tiny prick of the needle as the anesthetic goes in.

After waiting a couple of minutes to make sure your mouth is anesthetized, the dentist will start work on your tooth.

Remove Decay

The first step in placing a filling is to clean away the compromised structure. Your dentist will use an extremely small drill to ensure all of the cavity is gone without harming the remaining healthy tooth structure.

While this process is happening, water spray from the tool can fill your mouth. The assistant will vacuum excess water with a small suction hose.

Filling the Tooth

After removing the cavity, the dentist will place a liner that helps insulate the tooth. Next, the filling material is carefully piped into the opening. The dentist shapes the filling to make it flush with your tooth and then cures it with a special light to harden it.

Once the filling is done, your dentist will have you bite down on a piece of colored paper to see how it interacts with other teeth. If your filling looks and feels good, you’re done! You’ll probably still be numb from the anesthetic for a few minutes afterwards.

Ask your dentist for some post-filling procedure tips.

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050

Oct
20

Is it a Good Idea to Travel During Orthodontic Treatment?

Posted in Orthodontics

Traveling while you have braces can be tricky, but it is still possible. It mainly depends on where you’re going, how long you’ll be away, and how well you already take care of your braces.

Here are few pointers that can help you have a successful journey, braces and all.

Visit Your Current Orthodontist for Advice

The very first thing you should do before heading out of town is visit your orthodontist. He or she knows your case best and can share some tips for safe travel with braces. Your orthodontist may even recommend places you can go if you have problems with your braces while on your trip.

Contact an Orthodontist at Your Destination

If you’ll be away for a long time, then you might want to contact a new orthodontist who can continue your orthodontic treatment while you’re in the new place. Your current treatment provider can pass along your treatment records.

In general, however, it’s better to complete your treatment from start to finish in one location.

Pack Smart to Care for Your Braces

You should always travel prepared to keep your braces clean no matter where you go by packing a toothbrush, toothpaste, orthodontic floss, and even interdental brushes. Also carry braces wax and a pain killer with you to stay comfortable in case your braces start to bother you.

If you’re just going on a short trip that you can fit in between your orthodontic appointments, then traveling with braces is usually very simple. Consult your family’s orthodontist or dentist if planning a lengthy trip, especially if the one with braces is your child.

With professional advice and careful preparation, traveling with braces is easy!

Posted on behalf of:
West Hill Family Dental
132 New Britain Avenue
Rocky Hill, CT 06067
(860) 563-3303

Oct
20

Sleeping in Dentures—What’s the Harm?

Posted in Dentures

Wearing your denture overnight on occasion might not seem that harmful, especially if it’s just once in a while. But there are a few reasons why you shouldn’t let it become a habit.

Your Jaw Needs a Break from Your Denture

Dentures have a major downside: they put pressure on your jawbone and make it wear away over time. The less you wear your denture, the slower this process will happen.

Your Gums Need a Break from Your Denture

Dentures trap food debris and bacteria against your gums. If you don’t remove your denture for a day or more at a time, all the gunk trapped against your gums can make them irritated and swollen. Let your gums “breathe” by removing your denture at night.

Wearing a Denture Overnight Causes Bad Breath and Infections

Your mouth produces very little saliva when you sleep. The drier environment provides the perfect place for bacteria and fungus to flourish. If you often wear your denture at night, then you’ll be at higher risk for smelly and uncomfortable infections.

Your Denture Could Dry Out at Night

Less saliva in your mouth means less moisture to keep your denture acrylic supple. Your denture may dry out and become uncomfortably tight if you tend to breathe through your mouth when you sleep.

So if you do need to wear your denture all night long on one or two special occasions, you should be fine. Just make time in the morning after you wake up to give your denture a thorough cleaning. Don’t let this become a habit, however!

Ask your denture dentist for more tips on keeping your denture clean, functional, and comfortable.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Oct
20

How to Safely Clean Baby Teeth for a Healthy Smile

A healthy mouth is important to a healthy body at every stage of life. Your child’s oral hygiene routine should start from day one. Here’s how you can safely clean your child’s mouth to lower their risk of childhood tooth decay.

Start with a Soft Cloth

Wipe your baby’s mouth with a moistened soft cloth after each feeding. This will prevent infections, sores, and bad breath and get your child used to a routine of good oral hygiene. It also feels good on sore gums during the teething phase.

After the First Teeth Arrive

Once your child’s teeth break through the gum tissue, it’s time to switch to a soft-bristled toothbrush. Baby toothbrushes have small heads for comfort and large handles to make it easy for you to maneuver.

Use a smear of fluoride toothpaste that’s the size of a grain of rice. Baby teeth need fluoride to help them resist decay.

When to Start Flossing

Flossing should begin as soon as there are enough teeth in the mouth that they touch each other on the sides. Sometimes, baby teeth have enough space between them that brushing is enough to clean all surfaces.

Whether your child has crowded baby teeth or a mix of baby and adult teeth, the teeth will need flossing once they’re closely packed together.

Visit a Pediatric Dentist

Schedule your child’s very first dental checkup as soon as their first baby teeth arrive. Plan an appointment if their teeth haven’t arrived by their first birthday. This early appointment is important to ensuring that your child is healthy and developing well.

Ask a pediatric dentist near you for more tips on caring for your infant’s teeth.

Posted on behalf of:
Dental Care Acworth
5552 Robin Road Suite A
Acworth, GA 30102
(678) 888-1554

Oct
20

6 of Your Biggest Questions About Dental Implants—Answered!

Posted in Dental Implants

Are you thinking about replacing one or more teeth with dental implants? Get the answers to your biggest questions first.

  1. “Do dental implants hurt?”

No, getting dental implants is a pain-free procedure. A significant dose of local anesthesia will ensure you don’t feel a thing. Very basic pain medication is usually sufficient to manage any post-surgery discomfort. Implant surgery is so minimal that it’s actually less painful than other dental procedures.

  1. “Are dental implants as strong as natural teeth?”

Dental implants are as strong as natural teeth and can be even stronger because of their direct bond with the bone. You can chew all of your favorite foods with dental implants.

  1. “Can dental implants fall out like dentures?”

No, dental implants aren’t going anywhere once they heal into your jawbone. They aren’t removable so there’s no worry that they’ll fall out like dentures can.

  1. “How successful are dental implants?”

Dental implants have an average success rate of over 95%. They are ranked among the most predictably successful dental treatments out there.

  1. “How much do dental implants cost?”

The cost of dental implants depends on a variety of factors. Price will vary from location to location and also depends on each individual dentist or the materials they use for the procedure. You will pay more for multiple implants than for just one.

  1. “Why should I get dental implants?”

Why should you choose an implant as a tooth replacement? Dental implants:

  • Look and feel natural
  • Preserve the shape of your smile
  • Prevent other teeth from shifting
  • Are easy to maintain

Contact an implant dentist with any other questions you have about dental implants.

Posted on behalf of:
Smiles by Seese
610 Jetton St #250
Davidson, NC 28036
(704) 895-5095

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