Dental Tips Blog

Sep
13

4 Signs It’s Time to Update Your Dental Fillings

Posted in Fillings

A dental filling is the most efficient way to get rid of a cavity. Fillings, however, don’t last forever.

How do you know that it’s time to update a dental filling? There are a few signs that can clue you in.

Loose Fillings

If you notice that a filling in your tooth wiggles or shifts when you bite on it, then that’s a dead giveaway that it needs to be replaced! A loose filling signals that it’s lost the tight seal with the tooth that it’s supposed to have.

Fractured Tooth

Have you found pieces of tooth breaking off from around a dental restoration? That could mean your filling has been putting too much strain on the tooth and cracked it. You’ll need a new restoration that will repair the damage.

Pain or Sensitivity

Sudden unexplained pain or sensitivity often means trouble. This is especially so if the tooth in question has a filling that hasn’t caused you any pain until now.

Floss Catching or Food Getting Stuck

A loose or damaged filling may no longer lie flush with the tooth. You might have rough bits sticking out that trap food debris or snag on dental floss. This is an important sign to look for if you have old fillings on the surfaces between your teeth.

Suspect You Need a New Filling?

Your dentist can provide a comprehensive assessment of your existing dental work. You’ll either have the peace of mind from knowing nothing’s wrong or be glad that you got in for treatment before a real problem showed up. So rather than waiting until your tooth hurts or your fillings fall out, be proactive by scheduling a dental checkup.

Posted on behalf of:
Smiles by Seese
610 Jetton St #250
Davidson, NC 28036
(704) 895-5095

Sep
13

Eat This Instead of That: 5 Alternative Ways to Enjoy Your Favorite Foods with Dentures

Posted in Dentures

New dentures can put a bit of a damper on your diet. But all’s not lost—a little creativity is all you need to enjoy your favorite flavors in denture-friendly bites until you get a bit more proficient with chewing.

 

 

Instead of Tortillas, Try Tortilla Soup

 

Get that south-of-the-border flavor fix in a hearty tortilla soup where the meat and tortillas are shredded up into soft and manageable bits. You won’t have to use your denture too much to enjoy this!

Instead of a Green Salad, Try a Green Smoothie

Fresh veggies are essential to your health but they’re almost impossible to eat without teeth. Thank goodness for blenders! Whip up your favorite greens with some juice or yogurt for a drinkable salad.

Instead of Chicken Wings, Try Chicken Wing Dip

There’s just nothing that can replace those messy wings on game day. But chicken wing dip is a close second! By heating cooked shredded chicken meat with hot sauce, cheeses, and ranch dressing, you can create a flavorful concoction that’s boneless and denture-friendly.

Instead of Steak, Try Beef Stew

You may always have a hard time grinding up meats with your denture. Opt for slow-cooked and stewed meats that “melts in your mouth” instead.

Instead of Carrots, Try Sweet Potatoes

Are fresh carrots too hard and slippery to chew with your denture? Roasted or boiled sweet potatoes pack a similar amount of the nutrients found in carrots and are much softer to eat.

For the most part, wearing dentures means you’ll have to find new ways to cut up and soften your foods for easy chewing. Your dentist can give you some more suggestions for a healthy and flavorful denture diet as you adjust to your new prosthesis.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Sep
13

5 Fast Facts About Dental Crowns

Posted in Crowns

These facts may test your knowledge about dental caps.

Fact #1: Dental Crowns are Made to Look Like Natural Teeth

Capping your teeth doesn’t mean they have to be covered in gold. Most modern dental crowns are actually made from materials such as ceramic and zirconia, which offer a natural finish.

Fact #2: Dental Crowns Don’t Last Forever

Sooner or later, decay may sneak back into the tooth under the crown margin or the crown itself can wear away. Don’t be surprised if your dentist recommends replacing a dental crown that’s ten or more years old.

Fact #3: You Have Control Over How Long Your Crown Lasts

While dental crowns won’t last forever, you can get a lot of mileage out of your caps if you take care of them. Maintaining good oral hygiene and avoiding very hard foods can help you keep your crowns in great shape for years.

Fact #4: Two Opposing Teeth May Both Need Crowns

Capping one tooth may put the opposite tooth at risk of premature wear. The opposing neighbor might need to be capped just to prevent fracture. Of course, this primarily depends on the material used. Gold crowns, for example, tend to be very gentle against natural teeth.

Fact #5: Dental Crowns Enhance Your Smile

You can opt for a dental crown to improve the esthetic appearance of any tooth. A tooth doesn’t have to be decayed or falling apart to qualify for a crown. Dental caps are perfect ways to make teeth look whiter and more even while keeping them strong.

Schedule a consultation with a restorative dentist near you to find out more about the benefits of dental crowns.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Sep
11

Long Teeth: What Causes Them and What You Can Do About Them

Posted in Gum Disease

Come Halloween time, many people are thinking up scary costumes to put on for parties and outings. Yet it seems that the scariest features are the ones that don’t come off when you remove the mask!

Realizing that your teeth are getting longer can be a terrifying experience.

What causes this condition? Is there anything you can do to prevent it?

Gum Recession Causes Long Teeth

It’s probably not that your teeth are getting longer but that your gums are getting shorter. Gum recession is when the tissue that normally covers your teeth shrinks away and exposes the long yellow roots.

Gum recession can be caused by a number of factors:

  • Brushing your teeth too hard or using a rough toothbrush
  • Clenching and grinding your teeth
  • Orthodontic treatment
  • Gum disease
  • Poor tooth alignment
  • Age

How to Prevent Long Teeth

There may be some gum recession factors that you have no control over. But by changing up a few small things in your daily routine, you should be able to slow down the damage.

For example, try switching to a toothbrush with soft or even extra soft bristles. Swap the manual toothbrush for a powered one that cleans your teeth for you with just the right amount of pressure.

What about the damage that’s already been done? Your dentist can recommend a few solutions for protecting your exposed teeth and keeping them bright and healthy. Dental bonding and fluoride treatments are very good for fixing long teeth. In extreme cases, you may even qualify for gum grafting to replace the lost tissue.

Ask your dentist for more advice on how to make your teeth look shorter and less scary!

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Sep
11

Why Cheap Dentures Are a Huge Waste of Money

Posted in Dentures

Dentures can certainly be pricey. In an effort to save money, you might want to pay for the cheapest set you can find.

But as long as it’s within your budget to do so, you should seriously consider doing the opposite: paying for the best ones you can afford.

Here’s why…

You Get What You Pay For

A cheap denture costs less because it’s made from cheaper materials and/or isn’t customized as well to fit your mouth. As a result, it’s apt to give out far sooner than you’d think. You’ll then spend a lot of time and money on repairing your denture time and again.

Cheap materials also mean that your denture may be more prone to hosting infectious pathogens like bacteria and fungus. Microscopic cracks in the cheap acrylic could lead to bad breath, sore gums, and frequent bouts of thrush.

Quality Materials, Quality Life

Paying more for a nicer denture means investing in a better quality of living. The teeth on your denture will look more natural, the acrylic won’t fracture quite so easily, and it’ll be easier to get that perfect fit. A quality denture also means a better diet since you’ll have an easier time of chewing your food.

Affordable Dentures That Last

Don’t settle for buying the cheapest dentures possible. Rather, you want a set that will last you the longest and help you keep your gums and remaining teeth healthy.

Talk with your dentist or prosthodontist about creating the right kind of denture that meets your needs without emptying your bank account. The dental office may also have suggestions on convenient payment plans to help you comfortably afford your denture.

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

Sep
11

Pain After Dental Implant Surgery: What’s Normal and What Isn’t

Posted in Dental Implants

Whether you have a dental implant procedure scheduled or are just curious about the possibility, you’re duly concerned about how much it could hurt.

Some pain after a dental procedure is to be expected. But how much is normal for implants?

Typical Discomfort After Getting a Dental Implant

An implant surgery involves only a very small part of your mouth. You’ll also be numbed up the entire time, so you won’t feel anything. Even so, the procedure involves small incisions on your gum tissue and creating a hole in the bone. Minor discomfort is normal after the numbing wears off, but bone doesn’t have any nerve endings so the pain is minimal.

On the whole, however, most dental implant recipients are surprised to report that it didn’t hurt as bad as they thought it would. The discomfort usually lasts no longer than ten days with each day an improvement over the last. There may be some swelling, too, but that usually disappears within a few days of the procedure.

You can greatly reduce your discomfort after getting a dental implant by holding an ice pack against your face, taking a pain reliever, getting lots of rest, and sticking to a soft foods diet for a couple days.

Signs Something Is Wrong After Getting a Dental Implant

What kind of pain is not normal for a dental implant recovery? You’ll want to watch out for these signs of trouble:

  • Pain that lasts longer than two weeks
  • Pain that shows up long after you’ve recovered from your implant
  • Fever during recovery
  • Implant parts feeling loose
  • Swelling that won’t go down or that spreads to other parts of your face

Talk with a local implant dentist to learn more about the benefits and risks of getting a dental implant.

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

Sep
11

Lose a Dental Filling in Your Candy? 3 Simple Steps to Take

Posted in Fillings

With the holiday season comes an abundance of sweets to suit every taste. One of the many dangers of candy, however, is its potential for destroying dental restorations.

Be prepared for the next time a chewy caramel, crunchy brittle, or gooey taffy pulls out a filling. Dentists recommend taking these steps in advance of the holiday sweets rush.

  1. Get a Dental Checkup

For the most part, dental fillings can hold up to candy. If one falls out while you’re munching on some candy corn, then that’s a sign that a new cavity may have loosened it up beforehand.

Make sure that all of your crowns, bridges, and fillings are in good shape before you embark on your next candy binge. Schedule a dental exam to see whether there are any weak areas in need of updating.

  1. Buy a Temporary Dental Filling Kit

You can find a temporary dental cement in any drugstore. This cement will come in handy for dental emergencies that happen over the weekend or on out-of-town trips when you won’t be near your regular dentist for a couple days.

Keep the kit on-hand so that you’ll be prepared to replace a lost filling. The easy directions for using the cement will come with the package.

  1. Use Extra Fluoride

Fluoride strengthens tooth enamel that gets weakened by acids and sugars found in candy. Shore up your teeth by rinsing with a fluoride mouthwash for weeks before you start indulging. Doing so can help your teeth avoid weakening around your existing dental fillings.

How else can you keep your teeth and fillings strong throughout the year? Find out by visiting your local dentist.

Posted on behalf of:
Park South Dentistry
30 Central Park S #13C
New York, NY 10019
(212) 355-2000

Sep
11

Do You Need a Crown After a Root Canal?

Posted in Root Canals

Why would you need a crown on a tooth that’s had a root canal? Your dentist isn’t trying to earn extra money by charging you for an unnecessary procedure. There are actually six important reasons to cap the tooth.

  1. A Tooth Is Weak After a Root Canal

Root canal therapy is very tough on a tooth and dries it out from the inside. The result is a brittle shell that may need the extra protection that only a crown can provide.

  1. You Had the Root Canal on a Back Tooth

Front teeth don’t support much weight when you chew but your molars take a beating. That’s why back teeth that get root canals almost always need to be capped.

  1. You Grind Your Teeth

A teeth-grinding habit is damaging on all teeth but it’s especially dangerous for fragile ones that just had a root canal. A crown will make your endodontically treated tooth last longer.

  1. Your Tooth Is Stained

Has your tooth turned gray from decay or trauma? That kind of stain won’t bleach out no matter what you try. Placing a crown might be the best way to make your tooth look more natural and healthier.

  1. A Crown Insulates Remaining Nerves

Sometimes, a root canal can’t access all the extra nerves attached to your tooth. Crowning your tooth will protect them and spare you any painful sensitivity.

  1. Crowns Seal Out Decay

A new cavity would further weaken your treated tooth. Your dentist may recommend a crown to protect your tooth if it’s at high-risk for developing more decay.

Ask your dentist about the best options for protecting your tooth after a root canal.

Posted on behalf of:
Muccioli Dental
6300 Hospital Pkwy # 275
Johns Creek, GA 30097
(678) 389-9955

Sep
11

Child’s Upper Lip Stuck Between the Front Teeth? No Need to Worry!

You were thrilled to see those two little baby teeth on the bottom make their appearance! Now, your little one is growing in their upper front teeth to match. Everything seems to be going smoothly except . . . skin on the inside of your child’s upper lip seems stuck between those two new teeth.

What’s going on? Well, it’s most likely a harmless and very common phase of baby smile development.

What’s a Frenulum?

By gently rolling your child’s lip away from the teeth and looking closer, you may see that there’s a taut piece of skin anchoring it in place. Place your own tongue just in front of your upper front teeth and while keeping your lips closed. Your tongue should feel a sharp blade of tissue at the tip.

This tissue that both you and your child have is a normal part of human anatomy. In some people, especially very small children who are just growing in their first teeth, this skin anchor may be positioned very low between upper front teeth.

Should You Do Anything?

A low frenulum is not a medical or dental emergency. Keep an eye on your baby to make sure he or she is still eating normally and there aren’t any speech concerns.

Schedule an appointment with your pediatric dentist to have your child’s baby teeth examined. There’s usually not much to do but wait and see how the gap (and frenulum) change as your child’s mouth develops. If it turns out that the skin anchor is too low or too tight, then trimming it is a fast and harmless procedure. Call your dentist to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
Mitzi Morris, DMD, PC
1295 Hembree Rd B202
Roswell, GA 30076
(770) 475-6767

Sep
11

4 Things You Never Knew About Dental Sedation

Think you’ve heard it all when it comes to sedation dentistry? Test your knowledge with the following four facts about dental sedation that all dentists want you to know.

  1. Dental Sedation Doesn’t Really Put You to Sleep

Forget the whole “sleep” dentistry idea; it’s a bit misleading. Sedation can make you feel drowsy enough to doze off, but the goal isn’t to render you completely unconscious. Rather, it just relaxes you enough to keep you calm and to dull the pain.

  1. Dental Sedation Doesn’t Eliminate All the Pain

The sedation used in a dental office isn’t the general anesthesia used in an operating room. Your dentist offers something much lighter. Again, since sedation only helps you relax, you’ll also need some local anesthetic to prepare your teeth for treatment.

  1. Some Dental Sedation Starts Working the Night Before

If you suffer from severe dental anxiety, your dentist may prescribe a sedative for you to take the night before your appointment. This will ensure that you get a good night’s rest and don’t feel as nervous when you come in.

  1. Sedation Can Even Help Those Who Aren’t Afraid of Dentistry

Don’t need drugs to brave your dental cleanings? That’s perfectly fine. But sedation can still come in handy if you’d like to get multiple lengthy procedures done in one day. This will spare you the need to return for more than one appointment.

How does sedation help? The medication will make it feel like hours of treatment were wrapped up within a few brief minutes.

Do you have any other questions about dental sedation that weren’t addressed? Your sedation dentist will be happy to clear things up. Call to schedule a consultation to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
Mansouri Family Dental Care & Associates
4720 Lower Roswell Rd
Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-8222

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