Dental Tips Blog

Feb
21

3 Ways to Prevent a Dental Emergency

Your teeth are strong. In fact, they are made from the most durable substance in your entire body! However, this doesn’t mean that your teeth can’t suffer damage. An unexpected tooth fracture is one of the most common types of dental emergencies. Fortunately, there are ways to restore your tooth from damage, whether it was cracked, chipped or broken. But if you’d like to try and avoid the dental emergency visit altogether, follow these preventive tips for your family:

#1 Wear A Mouthguard
One of the most prevalent places for mouth-related injuries to occur is on the playing field. If your child is involved in sports, consider a custom fit mouthguard for valued protection. A mouthguard can protect the teeth, gums, lips and cheek from injury or laceration. Recent studies have even concluded that a mouthguard lowers concussion risk in youth sports.

#2 Be Smart With Your Teeth
Your teeth are designed to help you chew and digest food. They are not tools for opening bottles or clipping nails. Bad dental habits on a daily basis can cause your tooth structure to weaken and eventually fracture. If you like to chomp ice, bite your nails or rip open packages with your teeth, you’re more likely to find yourself calling for an emergency dental appointment.

#3 Practice Good Oral Hygiene
One of the best ways to ensure your teeth are strong and healthy is to keep them clean. Brushing and flossing on a daily basis keeps cavities at bay. When decay develops on your teeth, the tooth is weakened and more vulnerable to cracking or chipping. Severe decay can also lead to excruciating tooth pain that keeps you from your daily tasks.

While the above guidelines can lower your chances for encountering a dental emergency, there is no way to prevent it completely. If you are suffering from a dental emergency, don’t ignore it. Neglecting to treat a damaged, injured or infected tooth can lead to worsening pain and more costly treatment.

Farhan Qureshi, DDS is proud to offer a full menu of emergency dentistry services in a state-of-the-art dental practice in Arlington. Dr. Qureshi can restore your smile with attention to health, function and aesthetics.

Posted on behalf of:
Farhan Qureshi, DDS
2300 N Pershing Dr, #373
Arlington, VA 22201
(571) 970-5082

Feb
14

Are Veneers Bad For Your Enamel?

Veneers have been in vogue on the cosmetic dentistry scene since about 1982.

Using a thin sheet of hand crafted porcelain, your dentist can reshape the front of your tooth to complete your smile. Veneers are used to close up gaps, smooth out edges, brighten tooth color, and fill out chipped areas.

For as great as dental veneers look, some people rightly wonder just how safe they are.

Placing a Veneer

To make a porcelain shell stay on your smile and feel natural, your dentist has to remove a small layer of the enamel from the front of the tooth. This helps your new veneer to feel comfortable. Otherwise, you’d notice the bulk of simply pasting an extra layer over your tooth.

A ‘glue’ or cement seals the veneer permanently in place.

Is all this enamel-removal and cementing healthy for a natural tooth?

How Veneers Affect Your Teeth

The only enamel removed is an amount equal in thickness to the veneer material. Even though your teeth lose this enamel, it’s entirely replaced with a durable porcelain material and reinforced with a chemical bond. Your new ‘false fronts’ are permanent.

Your teeth can be compromised if you have the habit of grinding them. In that case, you could easily pop the veneers off unintentionally. Wear a guard at night to protect your teeth. If you slack off in brushing and flossing, it’s still possible for your beautiful new teeth to suffer from decay, just as they would normally.

Ask your dentist to evaluate your smile and make sure that you qualify. He or she will ensure that your teeth are healthy and strong. This way, you can enjoy your veneers for 10, 15, or even 20 years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
Group Health Dental
230 W 41st St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 398-9690

Feb
14

Should You Replace Your Fillings?

Posted in Fillings

It would definitely be nice if your dental fillings could last forever.

The reality is, however, that no dental restoration can withstand a lifetime of use. From crowns to fillings to veneers, all will need to be updated at some point. This is because once your natural tooth structure is compromised, it has to be protected. Artificial protection wears away with time.

So yes, your dental fillings will eventually need to be replaced.

But how do you know when the time is right?

Reasons to Replace Restorations

People may opt to update their fillings at will just because they want prettier ones that blend in with their teeth. Classic metal restorations stand out and even the white composite ones can stain and break down. You may also choose to replace your fillings for cosmetic purposes.

Do you grind or clench your teeth? That habit contributes to premature wear on the fillings and teeth in many patients. Like them, you should reinforce weak spots with fresh strong restorations and then look into getting a guard to protect your new dental work.

Traditional amalgam metal fillings contain mercury. While this element isn’t enough to cause you any issues, some people like to clean out all traces of it, just to be safe.

When Not to Replace

After examining your tooth, your dentist may feel that it’s not worth replacing the fillings. Some of the reasons may include:

  • Your tooth is not structurally strong enough to support a larger filling
  • The filling is still holding up well
  • You have better option for restoring and supporting a tooth

If you’re in doubt about the integrity of your current fillings, plan a visit to your dentist to get a professional perspective.

Posted on behalf of:
Kennesaw Mountain Dental Associates
1815 Old 41 Hwy NW #310
Kennesaw, GA 30152
(770) 927-7751

Feb
14

4 Questions to Ask Your Dentist About Your New Dental Crown

Posted in Crowns

Evidence of the earliest dental crowns dates back to around 700 B.C. in Europe. In the past century, the art of crafting caps that fit comfortably has improved considerably.

If you need a crown today, you can be sure that you’re getting a sanitary and safe restoration. Before having treatment done, however, make sure that you and your dentist are on the same page by getting answers to these questions.

  1. How Much Will My Crown Cost?

A crown can cost anywhere from several hundred to a couple thousand dollars. What you pay is determined by things like:

  • Materials used
  • Location of the office
  • How much your insurance covers
  1. Is Anything Covered By Insurance?

Your insurance benefits are determined by you or your employer. It’s good to familiarize yourself with the benefits you have available. Many insurances today will cover a single crown procedure for a tooth once every five years. Most dental crowns last far longer than that. Your dental office will help you understand your dental insurance policy.

  1. Are There Any Alternatives to a Crown?

If your tooth can support a more conservative restoration, then an onlay may be a good option. In some cases, it may be too risky to attempt a crown and the better route is to extract the tooth. Ask your dentist why he or she recommends a crown above other treatment alternatives.

  1. Which Type of Crown is Best for Me?

Crowns come in different materials such as:

  • Gold
  • Porcelain
  • Porcelain/metal combinations

Which one you should have depends on how much bite force the crowned tooth will experience and how well you want it to blend in with your smile.

Also ask your dentist about how to make your crown last.

Posted on behalf of:
Grateful Dental
2000 Powers Ferry Rd SE #1
Marietta, GA 30067
(678) 593-2979

Feb
14

Understanding Periodontal Pockets

Posted in Periodontics

Ever heard of “pocketing” in the gums?

Whenever your dentist or hygienist measures your gums with a little dental probe and calls out numbers, they’re looking for periodontal pockets.

What Makes it a Pocket?

Your gums are not empty sockets around your teeth. They actually have tiny fibers that connect into the tooth. These fibers not only protect tooth roots, but they provide cushioning and support when you bite. All those ligaments and fibers make up the “periodontium” of your smile.

The empty space or shallow valley between a tooth and the gum tissue should not be very deep. A periodontal pocket happens when that trough of unattached gum tissue extends into the area where it should be attached.

The presence of a pocket also indicates that the bone supporting your tooth in that area is now gone. That’s even more bad news for your tooth.

Periodontal Pockets – Why They’re Dangerous

Why is a healthy periodontium so important?

As suggested earlier, the bone and ligaments around the roots of your teeth are critical for support. Once that support is lost, you risk losing the tooth. Not only that, but your gums are a gateway to the rest of your body. Periodontal disease in your gums can gradually affect your health in other ways.

How To Avoid Pockets

Your dentist will keep track of your gum health by taking measurements at least once a year. This will alert you to any areas of concern that need some more attention.

Keeping your teeth and gums clean is essential to avoiding an infection that triggers periodontal breakdown. Ask your dentist for suggestions on keeping your gums in top shape.

Posted on behalf of:
Crabapple Dental
12670 Crabapple Rd #110
Alpharetta, GA 30004
(678) 319-0123

Feb
14

4 Ways to Close the Gap in Your Smile

Posted in Braces

For some adults, a gap between the front teeth is part of their trademark look. It’s what makes them unique.

You, on the other hand, are tired of seeing that empty space in the mirror. It might have you hiding behind your lips when you smile and covering up with your hand when you laugh.

It’s time to say good-bye to that childish grin for good with one of these dental techniques.

  1. Invisalign

Invisalign is a well-known procedure involving a series of clear trays is the orthodontic procedure preferred by most adults. It’s ideal for cosmetic tweaks like bringing your two front teeth a bit closer together.

  1. Six Month Smiles

Braces are the traditional method for bringing teeth together. Lots of offices now offer a program called “Six Month Smiles” or fast braces, which uses problem-focused treatment for fast results.

Basically, you get braces put on only the one spot that needs them. This technique usually takes around six months, but you could see results in as soon as four months.

  1. Veneers

If you want to avoid moving your teeth altogether, then dental veneers may be an option.

Veneers are false fronts that replace a thin layer of enamel on the front of your top teeth. These porcelain shells can be designed to extend farther than your natural teeth, closing up any gaps between them.

  1. Bonding

Would you like a fast-fix?

Your dentist can minimize the space between your front teeth by reshaping them with a bit of tooth-colored filling material. It’s a quick and painless process with minimal damage to your tooth enamel.

Which option is right for your smile? Contact your local dentist to find out.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Feb
14

Is It Safe for Kids to Have Dental Sedation?

Like all loving parents, you want the best for your child. You’ve heard a lot about sedation dentistry and you wonder if it’s a good idea for your kids to have it.

Kinds of Sedation Available

Nitrous Oxide – Also known as laughing gas, this option is great because it has no side-effects or known allergies. It can be instantly reversed and gives kids a giggly feeling.

Oral – Pills or a syrup can help kids relax without making them unconscious. They probably won’t remember what happened or even care about what’s happening during treatment.

Intravenous (General) – Specialists trained in this will monitor your child the entire time they “sleep” during the procedure.

Why Your Dentist May Recommend Sedation

Children might need sedation if:

  • They have special needs that make it difficult for them to sit still
  • They need treatment at a very young age
  • They are especially nervous in the dental chair
  • Your dentist needs to perform a lengthy or complex procedure

Make Sedation a Safe Experience

Happily, you can play a part. Make sure that you follow the doctor’s orders exactly when it comes to preparing your child for treatment. This includes any directions about whether or not they can have breakfast on the day of the procedure.

Keep your tone and demeanor upbeat when you discuss the procedure with your child. It won’t help them if they pick up on your fear and anxiety! Do all you can to help them feel secure and comfortable after the sedation wears off. Lastly, trust that the medical staff at the office know exactly what to do and have your child’s best interests at heart.

Posted on behalf of:
Dr. David Kurtzman D.D.S.
611 Campbell Hill St. NW #101
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 980-6336

Feb
14

Why Dental Implants Are Becoming More Popular

Posted in Dental Implants

Traditionally, people had to replace missing teeth with false ones that had to be taken in and out. Complete dentures and partials are still very important replacements for a lot of people.

But dental implant technology has recently set a new standard in terms of medical care. Why are dental implants now the smile restoration of choice?

Implants Save Time

The best time-saver is the fact that you can brush and floss your implant along with the rest of your teeth. No need for removal, odd brushes, or soaking in special solutions. It’s as easy and time-efficient to care for implants as it is for any other teeth.

Everyone Wants a Natural Look and Feel

You have to admit that it can be embarrassing to have a removable dental prosthesis. Your “secret” could impact your nightly routine, social life, and what foods you enjoy while out of the house.

Dental implants are just as strong as natural teeth and aren’t likely to slip out the way a denture could. This means that you can laugh and smile without fear and eat whatever you want. No one ever has to know.

For a Permanent Solution, Choose Dental Implants

Because dental implants stay put for good, you don’t have to worry about adjustment appointments at your dentist’s office. Temporary tooth replacements such as partials and dentures wear down with time and need a dentist to update them. Not so with an implant. Once you get it, you have it for life.

In fact, you can expect to save money over time as you continue to care for your implant.

Is a dental implant the right option for you? Ask your dentist for a professional opinion.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Feb
14

Don’t Ignore Cavities in Baby Teeth!

It’s easy to think that your child doesn’t really need to have a baby tooth filled. After all, it will fall out soon, right? There’s actually a lot more to it.

Here are 5 reasons you shouldn’t ever ignore that cavity in your child’s baby tooth.

  1. Baby teeth are essential to adult tooth eruption.

A primary (baby) tooth is a placeholder and guide for the adult one to follow. If it falls out too soon from decay, the adult tooth may grow in crooked. Even worse, decay from a baby tooth can damage the permanent one before it even makes it to the surface.

  1. Where there’s one cavity, more will follow.

Cavities are extremely contagious between teeth. The longer a decayed tooth is there, the more likely other teeth will suffer.

  1. A toothache hurts your baby just as badly as it bothers you.

It’s simply not fair to assume that your child will be fine because the decayed tooth isn’t a permanent one.

  1. Poor self-image affect kids of all ages.

Don’t underestimate how your child may feel about having one or more rotted teeth. Tooth decay smells bad and other kids may make negative comments about your child’s hygiene. Some children are embarrassed to smile with their “dirty” or “ugly” teeth.

  1. An abscess can damage the brain.

A severely decayed tooth can develop an abscess. This is an acute infection of the nerves in a tooth that escapes into the surrounding jawbone. Sometimes, this infection can travel to the brain and cause life-threatening problems.

If your child complains of a toothache, visit your pediatric or family dentist as soon as possible.

Posted on behalf of:
Muccioli Dental
6300 Hospital Pkwy # 275
Johns Creek, GA 30097
(678) 389-9955

Feb
14

Caring for Your Partial Denture

Posted in Dentures

Your partial denture is an indispensable part of your daily routine. You can’t leave the house without it! A dental prosthetic doesn’t just help you chew. . . it completes your smile. Without it, you probably look like a whole different person.

How can you get the most mileage out of your partial?

Safe and Effective Partial Cleaning

To keep your dental appliance clean and strong:

  • Use a mild soap or approved denture cleaner on a daily basis
  • Brush with a soft denture brush
  • Clean thoroughly around each attachment
  • Rinse your partial well before putting it back in your mouth

Let Your Mouth Breathe

Your dentist will probably recommend that you take your partial denture out at night. This gives your oral tissues a chance to relax and protects your partial if you have a habit of grinding your teeth. Keep your appliance moist by soaking in a solution your dentist suggests. If it dries out, it can lose its shape.

When It Stops Fitting Comfortably

You should NEVER force your partial in. Doing so can damage the clasps or attachments that hold it in place. If you ever notice that it’s not fitting the way it used to, let your dentist know fairly quickly.

If your partial is not seated evenly, it could chafe, press against your gums or the roof of your mouth. Annoying though this may be, don’t undertake to adjust it yourself. Schedule a dental visit to have it adjusted.

Getting used to a new partial denture can be a frustrating journey – at first. Contact your dental team for help along the way and you’ll be smiling with confidence for many years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
Gilreath Dental Associates
200 White St NW
Marietta, GA 30060
(770) 514-1224

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