Dental Tips Blog

Mar
13

What’s Causing That Bad Taste in Your Mouth? 8 Possible Reasons

Posted in Gum Disease

There’s nothing like a bad taste in your mouth to ruin your appetite. But worse than that, an odd taste can indicate a serious oral health issue.

Is that bad taste due to one of the following causes?

Tooth Decay

A simple cavity can cause a strange taste in your mouth. Cavities are spots in your teeth where the enamel is actively dying, so the decaying tissue does have a foul taste.

Abscesses

When a cavity grows too large, it can infect the nerve of a tooth and create a sack of foul-tasting fluid on the gums. If it ruptures, your mouth will suddenly be filled with a salty taste.

Gum Disease

Chronically inflamed gums also give off a rancid taste as they break down. Strong breath odor coupled with a bad taste could signal periodontitis.

Plaque Buildup (Poor Oral Hygiene)

Don’t brush your tongue regularly? Bacterial plaque buildup can alter your taste sensation.

Tonsil Stones

Bacteria and food debris that collects in the pits on and near your tonsils can create a rotten-tasting, pebble-like formation.

Medications

Medications you take on a regular basis can cause a metallic taste in your mouth.

Acid Reflux

If you have stomach acid regularly washing back up into your throat, this can leave you with a particularly nasty taste in your mouth, especially first thing in the morning.

Thrush

You may have a treatable yeast condition called oral candidiasis if you notice white patches or sore red spots in your mouth along with an icky metallic taste.

Schedule a dental exam and talk with your local dentist to discover what’s causing bad breath issues for a fast solution to your halitosis woes.

Posted on behalf of:
Wayne G. Suway, DDS, MAGD
1820 The Exchange SE #600
Atlanta, GA 30339
(770) 953-1752

Mar
13

Is There an Age Limit for Getting Braces?

Posted in Braces

Teens are popular orthodontic patients. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t benefit from braces if your teen years are well behind you.

Why Teens Get Braces

The jaw bone in teens’ mouths is dynamic and heals quickly. This is important to the orthodontic process. Traditional braces put pressure on teeth to move them through bone tissue into new positions. The bone breaks down and reforms fast enough in young people’s mouths to allow teeth to successfully relocate within months.

Complicated orthodontic cases are also easier to correct in the developmental stages. Braces in the early years can prevent the need for surgery and lengthy treatment in adulthood.

Braces Work for Adults, Too!

While braces tend to have faster success in young mouths, that doesn’t mean they can’t benefit older patients just as much.

Braces work the same way in adults as they do for kids and teens. If you’ve got several decades of life behind you, then you might expect your treatment to take a bit longer than it does for your own kid.

The good news is that it’s almost never too late to get braces and experience the benefits!

Orthodontic Options for Adults

Older orthodontic patients usually want problem-focused treatment to cosmetically enhance their smiles.

Like other adult orthodontic patients, you may want a method that’s low-visibility, low-maintenance, and as fast as possible. Some suitable options include clear aligner trays, tooth-colored braces, and accelerated ortho.

If you have only slightly crooked teeth, then you might be able to make them look straighter without getting braces, at all. Dental veneers, for example, are a good orthodontic hack for adults.

Talk with a cosmetic dentist or orthodontist in your area to find out more.

Posted on behalf of:
Springfield Lorton Dental Group
5419-C Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 256-8554

Mar
13

How to Get Dentures That Don’t Look “Fake”

Posted in Dentures

The time has come for you to part with most of your remaining natural teeth. Fortunately, you can achieve a natural-looking smile by choosing a denture that looks realistic.

Find a Good Denture Dentist

Search for a dentist or prosthodontist who specializes in dentures. Almost any dentist can make you a denture, but the ones who focus on dentures have the time and experience to craft a realistic-looking set of teeth.

Denture providers take into consideration your facial features, skin tone, and bite physics to design a prosthesis that suits your unique needs.

Invest in a Quality Appliance

When it comes to dentures, you get what you pay for. Cheap dentures will have a rather generic appearance. It costs more to get one that’s tailored to your looks and preferences. If you choose the cheapest option, you may end up with unnaturally large, white, or square teeth on your denture.

It’s worth it to get a set of teeth that look like your natural ones.

Consider an Implant Bridge or Implant-Supported Denture

Have you given any thought to dental implants? Now is a good time to do so before you start planning the extraction of your remaining teeth.

It isn’t practical to replace every single tooth with its own dental implant. But you can get two or four implants in an arch to support a denture appliance.

These implants will help preserve the shape and height of your smile since they add structure to your jaw bone. This is the best way to keep your smile looking natural, while wearing a denture.

Ask a dentist near you about which option is best for replacing your natural teeth.

Posted on behalf of:
Soft Touch Dentistry
1214 Paragon Dr
O’Fallon, IL 62269
(618) 622-5050

Mar
13

Hate Your Smile? How Dental Veneers Can Help

Posted in Veneers

Dental veneers can fix almost any problem to get you a smile you’ll love.

What Are Dental Veneers?

A veneer is a single, thin, cosmetic dental restoration which is usually made from porcelain. It covers the entire front of a tooth, changing how it looks from the outside.

How Dental Veneers Can Improve Your Smile

Dental veneers can cover up stubborn stains. You may also get a veneer to widen the size of one or two teeth to close up a gap between them. If one of your front teeth has a chip in the edge or enamel with a rough texture, then a veneer can smooth out its appearance.

If you choose to get a veneer or two, you’ll need to schedule a few dental appointments. The first visit assesses your smile’s cosmetic needs. The next one involves trimming down the enamel so that the restorations aren’t too bulky. Your dentist will also take a mold of the prepared teeth, which is used to design the veneers.

By the last appointment, you dentist will check the fit of the veneers and bond them into place.

Are Veneers Right for You?

Dental veneers usually only go on upper front teeth, where they won’t experience too much bite pressure. They also need to be kept very clean to avoid developing cavities around the edges. Veneers can make radical changes in your smile, but they can’t treat active decay or major damage.

Do you have a tooth or two with some cosmetic flaws? If your teeth are healthy, then you may qualify to upgrade your smile with dental veneers. Ask your dentist for more information.

Posted on behalf of:
Smiles by Seese
610 Jetton St #250
Davidson, NC 28036
(704) 895-5095

Mar
13

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay – What It Is and How to Prevent It

Baby bottle tooth decay involves severe cavities in baby teeth (especially the front ones) of a toddler’s mouth. It’s a serious condition that requires urgent care. At the same time, it’s also easily preventable.

What Causes Tooth Decay in Babies?

A specific kind of bacteria that lives on teeth feeds off of the sugar that a person eats. These germs give off an acidic waste product that wears holes (cavities) in teeth.

A diet low in sweets and a daily oral hygiene routine are usually enough to keep cavities at bay. But small children tend to be at high risk for a couple of reasons:

  • They can’t properly clean their teeth themselves
  • They love sweet drinks like juice and milk, often go to sleep while sipping on cup or bottle

If you as a parent aren’t careful about your child’s oral hygiene and natural sugar exposure, then they could be at high risk for developing baby bottle tooth decay.

Consequences of Cavities in Toddlers

Decay in baby teeth can cause painful abscesses that affect the adult teeth before they come through. Abscesses can lead to life-threatening infections. If your child is suffering from cavities, they can have difficulty eating healthy foods or learning to speak properly. Hospitalization may even be necessary.

Prevent Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Never put your child to bed with a bottle of anything besides plain water. Limit sweet snacks and drinks to mealtimes to avoid constant sugar exposure throughout the day. As soon as your child’s first tooth arrives, start a routine of daily brushing with fluoride toothpaste.

Lastly, take your child to a pediatric dentist for a checkup by his or her first birthday!

Posted on behalf of:
West Hill Family Dental
132 New Britain Avenue
Rocky Hill, CT 06067
(860) 563-3303

Mar
13

Are You a Candidate for Dental Implants?

Posted in Dental Implants

You may be ready for dental implants if you can relate to any of the following situations…

You’ve Lost Teeth in an Accident

If you’ve lost your teeth to disease, then you’ll have to make sure the infection is treated and gone before you can get implants. Otherwise, the condition can eventually compromise your new dental implants.

Losing teeth to an accident, however, is usually a one-time thing, so implants are the perfect way to restore your smile after an automobile- or sports-related incident.

You Don’t Want to Wear a Partial Denture

Does the idea of having a removable prosthesis bother you? Do you already find it challenging to keep a partial denture clean?

Implants are the perfect option for those who want a tooth replacement solution that keeps their daily routine as normal as possible.

You Don’t Want to Damage Your Natural Teeth

A dental bridge is a good tooth replacement option. But it requires capping two other teeth for support. Crowning those otherwise healthy teeth can shorten their life expectancy. Getting an implant, however, won’t affect the remaining natural teeth at all.

You Love Keeping Your Smile in Tip-Top Shape

If you’re good about brushing and flossing every day, then implants may be an ideal choice for you.

Dental implants don’t require any more special cleaning or maintenance than natural teeth do, but they do require regular brushing and flossing to stay healthy. If you find it easy to keep up with your oral hygiene now, then dental implants may do very well in your mouth.

Talk with an implant dentist in your area to learn whether you qualify for this state-of-the-art procedure.

Posted on behalf of :
Prime Dental Care
417 Wall St
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 651-8618

Mar
13

4 Things You (Probably) Didn’t Know About Dental Fillings

Posted in Fillings

Are any of these facts news to you?

  1. Mercury Fillings Aren’t Poisonous

Amalgam (silver) fillings that contain mercury are not considered dangerous, so there’s no need to panic if you still have metal restorations.

The mercury in metal fillings can’t harm you, since inhaling a mercury vapor is what’s really toxic to humans. Your restorations don’t give off enough vapor to cause any toxicity. But if you’re still worried about them, your dentist can offer a safe removal method.

  1. The Oldest Known Dental Fillings Are Roughly 13,000 Years Old

In 2017, archaeologists at the University of Bologna discovered a human body that had teeth with evidence of dental work dating around 13,000 years old. Two front incisors appeared to have holes in them that were drilled with stone tools and then filled with a tar-like mixture.

  1. White Fillings “Move” with Your Teeth

Tooth-colored composite dental fillings are made from a material that contains a combination of plastic resin and glass. The result is a strong restoration that bonds with teeth and also moves with them.

Your teeth feel hard, but they actually expand and contract on a microscopic level with temperature changes. Metal fillings expand and contract too rapidly and this extreme activity can damage teeth from the inside. But white fillings move at the same rate natural tooth structure does, making them much a much more gentle and conservative restorative option.

  1. Dental Fillings Are Preventable!

Dental treatment doesn’t have to be inevitable. By cutting down on your sugar consumption, using fluoride toothpaste, and practicing good oral hygiene, you can lower your risk for needing a dental filling.

Talk with your dentist about other preventative dental treatments like sealants and fluoride varnish.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Smiles Dentistry
2655 Dallas Highway Suite 510
Marietta, GA 30064
770.422.8776

Mar
9

Your Local Dental Office – The Best Place to Conquer Dental Anxiety!

If you suffer from dental phobia or anxiety, then you may think that staying far away from the dentist is the best way to avoid a panic attack.

Heading to the dental office to cure your condition might sound counterintuitive, but it could end up being the solution you’ve been searching for!

Your Dentist Understands

Today’s modern dentists have extensive experience in helping people deal with dental anxiety. They know some great tips for reducing stress. Most likely, your dentist will be more than willing to talk with you outside of the clinical setting just to get to know you as an individual and understand your viewpoint.

You’ll Feel Better After Voicing Your Concerns

You will find a measure of relief and reassurance when you can unburden your worries to a dental professional. Feel free to ask questions about any procedure or problem. You might be surprised to learn how much dentistry has improved since your last experience. The less uncertainty you have in your mind, the more confidence you’ll have in treatment.

Have you had a bad experience in the past? Go ahead and describe it. Your dentist will have a clearer idea of how he or she can help you feel more comfortable.

Sedation Is Your Friend

Sedation dentistry is widely available in most of today’s dental offices. You can receive controlled levels of sedation to help you relax and doze your way through stressful procedures.

It’s time to do yourself a favor by conquering your dental anxiety for good. Your local dentist is the best resource to start with! Call a sedation dentist in your area and make plans for a relaxed consultation. Bring along a trusted friend for support.

Posted on behalf of:
Pure Dental Health
2285 Peachtree Rd #203
Atlanta, GA 30309
(678) 666-3642

Mar
9

Why Even Denture Wearers Need Preventative Dental Care

Posted in Dentures

If you have dentures, then why bother with dental appointments?

The reality is that you still need regular preventative and diagnostic care, even if you have no natural teeth left.

Your Denture Needs Maintenance

Your denture can develop small cracks over time that weaken it and provide a hideout for germs. Eventually, your denture can crack or cause sores on your mouth.

Also, your mouth changes shape as the jawbone shrinks under the pressure of a denture. Your denture won’t fit the way it used to unless you get it adjusted or re-lined by your dentist on a routine basis.

Regular preventative check-ups at the dental office will ensure that your denture stays in good working order for as long as possible.

Your Mouth Needs Checkups

If you don’t keep your mouth clean, you can develop sores and fungal infections. At regular checkups, your dentist will make sure your denture fits comfortably and that your current oral hygiene routine is working well for you. Those exams may also include x-rays and essential oral cancer screenings.

Your Oral Health Affects Your Overall Health

Whether you have teeth or not, your mouth is still an important part of your body. If you have an infection or disease going on in your mouth, then it can weaken your immune system. Bacteria left to grow under a denture can infect other parts of your body if they enter the bloodstream or airway.

If your denture is causing you discomfort, then you may even have trouble eating. A poor diet will result in nutritional deficiencies for your body.

Preventative dental visits will ensure that your mouth is healthy and that your denture fits well. Call a dentist near you today to plan a checkup.

Posted on behalf of:
Precision Digital Dentistry
674 US-202/206
Suite 7
Bridgewater, NJ 08807
(908) 955-6999

Mar
9

Why Does My Tongue Look Like This?

Posted in Oral Cancer

Not all tongues are pink and pretty at all times! Here are some of the main causes behind some unusual tongue appearances.

Your Tongue Looks: Patchy

What that could mean: This could be a condition called “geographic tongue” when patches of the surface become red and resemble the outline of countries on a map. Geographic tongue is not a dangerous condition.

Your Tongue Looks: White or Yellow

What that could mean: A white or yellow coating on your tongue may signify microbial growth. You could have a lot of bacterial plaque on your tongue’s rough surface.

Do you see any white patches on your throat or mouth, as well? Do you use an inhaler? Is your immune system compromised? If so, then the white coating could be a sign of a fungal infection called candidiasis (yeast infection).

White patches on your tongue (leukoplakia) could indicate patches of tissue your dentist should monitor for signs of oral cancer.

Your Tongue Looks: Black and/or Hairy

What that could mean: Medications such as digestive aids or chemotherapy can cause your tongue to darken. Your tongue may start to look “hairy” if the natural little bumps on the surface (papillae) start to lengthen instead of shedding cells, as they normally do. These long papillae can stain from foods, drinks, cigarette smoke, etc. and look like long black hair. Black hairy tongue is harmless and temporary.

Your Tongue Looks: Bright Red and Swollen

What that could mean: This condition most often indicates a vitamin B deficiency, but if it’s accompanied by a fever, you should see your doctor right away.

Do you have other questions about your oral health? Contact your local dentist to learn more.

Posted on behalf of:
Park South Dentistry
30 Central Park S #13C
New York, NY 10019
(212) 355-2000

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